Washington and the Higher Education: An Address Delivered Before Cornell University, February 22, 1888

Front Cover
Andrus & Church, 1888 - Education - 37 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 30 - I give and bequeath in perpetuity, the fifty shares which I hold in the Potomac company, (under the aforesaid acts of the Legislature of Virginia,) towards the endowment of a University, to be established within the limits of the district of Columbia, under the auspices of the general government...
Page 28 - The assembly to which I address myself, is too enlightened not to be fully sensible how much a flourishing state of the arts and sciences contributes to national prosperity and reputation. True it is, that our country, much to its honor, contains many seminaries of learning highly respectable and useful ; but the funds upon which they rest are too narrow to command the ablest' professors, an the different departments of liberal knowledge, for the institution contemplated, though they would be excellent...
Page 31 - God ! that one might read the book of fate, And see the revolution of the times...
Page 29 - States, to which the youths of fortune and talents from all parts thereof may be sent for the completion of their education, in all the branches of polite literature, in arts and sciences, in acquiring knowledge in the principles of politics and good government, and, as a matter of infinite importance in my judgment, by associating with each other, and forming friendships in juvenile years, be enabled to free themselves in a proper degree from those local prejudices and habitual jealousies which...
Page 29 - Looking anxiously forward to the accomplishment of so desirable an object as this is (in my estimation), my mind has not been able to contemplate any plan more likely to effect the measure, than the establishment of a UNIVERSITY in a central part of the WASHINGTON'S WILL.
Page 29 - I proceed after this recital, for the more correct understanding of the case, to declare; that, as it has always been a source of serious regret with me, to see the youth of these United States sent to foreign countries for the purpose of education, often before their minds were formed, or they had imbibed any adequate ideas of the happiness of their own ; contracting too frequently, not only habits of dissipation and extravagance, but principles unfriendly to republican government, and to the true...
Page 30 - ... to be vested in more stock, and so on, until a sum adequate to the accomplishment of the object is obtained ; of which I have not the smallest doubt before many years pass away, even if no aid or encouragement is given by the legislative authority, or from any other source.
Page 28 - I have greatly wished to see a plan adopted, by which the arts, sciences, and belles-lettres could be taught in their fullest extent, thereby embracing all the advantages of European tuition...
Page 29 - ... local attachments and State prejudices, as far as the nature of things would, or indeed ought to admit, from our national councils. Looking anxiously forward to the accomplishment of so desirable an object as this is (in my estimation), my mind has not been able to contemplate any plan more likely to effect the measure than the establishment of a UNIVERSITY in a central part of...
Page 30 - ... be required for its support, my further will and desire is, that the profit accruing therefrom shall, whenever the dividends are made, be laid out in purchasing stock in the bank of Columbia, or some other bank, at the discretion of my executors, or by the Treasurer of the United States for the time being under the direction of Congress, provided that honorable body should patronize the measure ; and the dividends proceeding from the purchase of such stock...

Bibliographic information