Familiar Letters to Henry Clay of Kentucky: Describing a Winter in the West Indies

Front Cover
Press of M. Day & Company, 1840 - Jamaica - 203 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 146 - And there he maketh the hungry to dwell, that they may prepare a city for habitation; 37 And sow the fields, and plant vineyards, which may yield fruits of increase.
Page 142 - Instead of the thorn shall come up the fir tree, And instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle tree: And it shall be to the Lord for a name, For an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.
Page 176 - And all the host of heaven shall be dissolved, and the heavens shall be rolled together as a scroll: and all their host shall fall down, as the leaf 1 alleili off from the vine, and as a falling fig from the fig tree.
Page 93 - City, and holding a pure faith in the unity of the Spirit and in the bond of peace...
Page 75 - Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low : and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain. And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together ; for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it.
Page 196 - Congress shall have the power "to exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding 10 miles square) as may, by cession of particular States and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the Government of the United States.
Page 89 - ... consequence is, that there have been no differences, and the people are working well. The quantity of work obtained from a freeman there is far beyond the old task of the slave. In the laborious occupation of holing, the emancipated negroes perform double the work of the slave in a day. In road-making, the day's task under slavery was to break four barrels of stone. Now, by task-work, a weak hand will fill eight barrels, a strong one from ten to twelve.
Page 176 - But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night ; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, and the earth also, and the works that are therein, shall be burned up.
Page 48 - But if ye bite and devour one another, take heed that ye be not consumed one of another.
Page 18 - Sunday market," as it is called. The slaves are allowed no one of the working days of the week for their own business. The consequence is, that multitudes of them throng from the country (often from a great distance) into the towns of Bassin and West End, on the First day of the week, with their provisions and fruits for sale. The rum shops are hard by the market places. The buyers, of course, misuse the day as well as the sellers ; and the scene is one, not...

Bibliographic information