Cultural Semiotics, Spenser, and the Captive Woman

Front Cover
Lehigh University Press, 1995 - Fiction - 278 pages
"In Cultural Semiotics, Spenser, and the Captive Woman, author Louise Schleiner uses concepts from A. J. Greimas to analyze The Shepheardes Calender (1579) as a discourse and as a definitive text for the Elizabethan "political unconscious," in the sense of Fredric Jameson, who also drew on Greimas. The book demonstrates sociolinguistic patterns at work in Elizabethan ideological conflicts, at a level that shows how those patterns were related to the energies of people's sexuality and their political and religious commitments. Through explaining this libidinal and political functioning of the Calender, in its time and for Spenser as a new poet, the book identifies an "ideologeme," widely observable in England of the 1580s and 1590s: that of the captive/capturing woman, a unit of interfactional and interclass discourse." "As well as discussing Spenser, two chapters include examples from music and balladry and use the "captive woman" construct to analyze material from such figures as Lyly, Shakespeare, the composer John Dowland, the Countess of Pembroke, and Queen Elizabeth I. A concluding chapter on the Calender's proferred text-readership game shows Spenser evolving his ordering of the twelve eclogues through inventing a strategic frame for them, an implied story that both celebrates and leaves behind his passionate friendship with Gabriel Harvey."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
13
A Brief Placement
17
The Unity of the Calender
27
Prophetic Pastor or Sickly Dying Lover?
30
The Morality of Power
35
Semiotics And The Recognition Of An Ideologeme
40
The Greimas Model and the Calenders Perspectival Framing
42
The Generative Trajectory
43
Economic Interests and the Captive Woman Ideologeme
116
How the Ideologeme Began To Tick and Work
123
The Classeme MalenessFemaleness within Ideologemes
125
The Captive Woman at Work
129
Britomart vs Radigund Gloriana of the Shield vs Philotime
130
The Ideologeme in the Arcadia Old and New
138
Lyly Dowland and the Squirearchist Pattern
143
Shrewtaming Pandosto and Shakespeares Rewriting of the Woman Recaptured
151

The Trajectorys Syntactic Side Including Actants of Communication and of Narration
46
Communication Actants and the Calenders Perspectival Framing
49
The Semantic Side of the Generative Trajectory
54
The Narrative Program
59
Is the Narrative Program GenderSpecific?
62
The Shepheardes Calender Analyzed through the Greimas Model
65
Segmentation and ExtractionInventory
66
Structuration
70
Recognizing the Base Narrative Program
75
The Instrumental Narrative Programs
80
Isaiah Excrescence as Expression and the Figurative Isotopy
89
The Calender as Prophecy and the Captive Woman Ideologeme
102
The Calenders Politics and Theology
105
The New Ideologeme and the Calenders Solution for the Insoluble Conflict
109
How Things Turn Out in December
113
Entrepreneurial Satire in Willobie His Avisa
158
Britomart vs Penelope
163
Tinkering with the Ideologeme? A Countess Tries to Speak
166
What the Queen Said
176
Compositional Order and Colins Framing of Male and Female Loves in The Shepheardes Calender
179
The Clear Identities
183
The Beclouded Identities
187
Groupings among the Eclogues and their Order of Composition
193
Colins Two Loves
198
Algorithm or Description Procedures Used
202
Data of the Algorithms Application
208
Notes
240
Bibliography
265
Index
275
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information