Page images
PDF
EPUB

230361

[ocr errors]

CONTENTS

No.

298. Report on necessity for bridge across Moencopi Wash, Ariz.

339. Message of President of United States to Congress, Dec. 2, 1913.

341. 23d report of Board of Ordnance and Fortification, 1913.

359. Report of board of trustees of Postal Savings System, 1913.

360. Cost of manufacture of ordnance at arsenals, 1913.

361. Report of disbursements for agricultural colleges.

384. Expenditures for preventing spread of epidemic diseases.

390. Construction of levees for flood prevention.

391. Reports of military prisons, Fort Leavenworth and Alcatraz Island.

453. Withdrawal of lands on Flathead or Jocko Reservation.

462. 10th International Veterinary Congress, London, 1914.

463. Study and investigation of boll weevil and hog cholera plagues.

467. Letter relative to estimates for enforcement of navigation laws.

480. Final report on removal of wreck of battleship Maine.

481. Protection of monuments on battlefield of Bull Run, Va.

482. Land withdrawals.

499. Wearing of uniforms of Army, Navy, and Marine Corps.

504. International Commission on Phytopathology, Rome, 1914,

505. Indian tuberculosis sanitarium and Yakima Reservation project.

516. Roads and bridges on Wind River Reservation.

559. Letter relating to need of appropriation for studies of pellagra.

577. Safeguarding coast of Alaska.

578. Protection of national military parks. 2 pts.

625. Message of President of United States relating to trusts. -

651. List of leases granted by Secretary of War during 1913.

652. Comment on H. 102 relating to immigration of aliens.

679. Interpretation of bill to establish national farm-land banks.

689. Regulation of immigration of aliens.

703. Additional observations concerning immigration bill.

710. British municipal trading undertakings.

754. Hearing on resolution to establish woman suffrage committee, House.

755. Prevention and eradication of hog cholera.

758. Rules of procedure in probate matters for Five Civilized Tribes.

CONGRESS

(

No.

BRIDGE ACROSS MOENCOPI WASH.

L E T T ER

FROM

THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR,

TRANSMITTING

A REPORT ON THE INVESTIGATION OF THE CONDITIONS ON THE WESTERN NAVAJO INDIAN RESERVATION, IN ARIZONA, WITH RESPECT TO THE NECESSITY OF CONSTRUCTING A BRIDGE ACROSS THE MOENCOPI WASH, ON SAID RESERVATION, ETC,

DECEMBER 1, 1913.-Referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs and ordered

to be printed, with illustrations.

[ocr errors]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, November 29, 1913. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

Sir: The Indian appropriation act for the current fiscal year, approved June 30, 1913 (Public, No. 4, p. 9), contains the following item:

The Secretary of the Interior is hereby authorized and directed to make an investigation of the conditions on the Western Navajo Indian Reservation, in Arizona, with respect to the necessity of constructing a bridge across the Moencopi Wash, on said reservation, and also to cause surveys, plans, and reports to be made, together with an estimated limit cost for the construction of a suitable bridge at that place, and submit his report thereon to Congress on the first Monday in December, nineteen hundred and thirteen, and the sum of $1,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated for the purpose herein authorized.

The agency for the Western Navajo Indian Reservation is located at Tuba, 76.6 miles from Flagstaff, Ariz., a station on the Santa Fe Railroad. All freight for the north country is hauled from Flagstaff over a road established by the Mormons more than 40 years ago. This road from Flagstaff to Tuba has been used by all travelers since that time, including Indians. The road crosses the Little Colorado River at Tanners Crossing, 54 miles north of Flagstaff, and it crosses the Moencopi Wash at a point approximately 17 miles north of the Little Colorado River.

A large waterstied, north and east drains into the Moencopi Wash. The flood. season includes July, August, and September, and there are occasional stórms during the remainder of the year. At the site for the proposed bridge the width of the wash is approximately 68 feet at the surface line, with a depth of 13 feet at the center of the stream. It is necessary to cross the Moencopi Wash in order to reach Tuba from the railroad. When a representative of the Indian service reached Tuba on September 14 of this year to investigate conditions the Moencopi Wash could not be forded at that time, and it was reported to him that it had been impossible to ford the stream at any time during the preceding 20 days.

În April last the Government constructed a temporary wooden bridge across the Moencopi Wash, which has been in use since that time. This temporary bridge is built in two sections, with a stone and concrete pier supporting the ends of the two sections. This center pier obstructs the flow of the stream in flood times, and trunks and limbs of large trees float down the stream from many miles above, which would doubtless have washed out the center pier had they not been discovered and taken out before the highest stage was reached.

During the fiscal year 1912 a steel suspension bridge 660 feet in length was constructed across the Colorado River at Tanners Crossing at a cost of $84,000. It was considered necessary to construct this bridge at Tanners Crossing so as to make it possible to cross the river at all seasons of the year, and the bridge has proved of great benefit. From 75 to 90 per cent of the travel across the bridge at Tanners Crossing must cross the Moencopi Wash, and it is necessary that a permanent structure be provided across the latter stream.

While the temporary bridge has been very helpful, there is great danger of it being washed out during the flood season. A permanent structure can be provided at comparatively small cost.

There are inclosed copies of reports of September 27 and October 29, 1913, by Supervisor of Construction John Charles, of the Indian service, who made an investigation of the conditions, together with copies of the specifications and blue-print copies of the plans, etc. The general plans submitted contemplate a structure with a 'steel span 72 feet in length and a roadway of 16 feet, with concrete abutments, at a total cost of $5,880. Respectfully,

FRANKLIN K. LANE.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

Washington, October 29, 1913. The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

Sir: Replying to office letter dated October 13, 1913, relative to the exact location of bedrock at the point where the north abutment of the proposed Moencopi Wash bridge is found, you are informed that the bedrock dips as it runs north and is reported to be 21 feet 8 inches below the surface at the point measured. The estimate anticipated the possibility of this condition, and no further provision is necessary. Respectfully,

JOHN CHARLES, Supervisor of Construction.

« PreviousContinue »