United States Congressional Serial Set

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1914 - United States
Reports, Documents, and Journals of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pennylane78 - LibraryThing

With this being an election year, I'm drawn more than usual to history and events that shaped our nation. Having read this, I'm interested to read other farewell addresses. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - PhilSyphe - LibraryThing

I'm reviewing the short story of 'The Valley of the Worm' and not a collection by that name. Howard presents another of his reincarnation tales, this time his main character recalls a previous life ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 73 - But we think the sound construction of the constitution must allow to the national legislature that discretion, with respect to the means by which the powers it confers are to be carried into execution, which will enable that body to perform the high duties assigned to it, in the manner most beneficial to the people. Let the end be legitimate, let it be within the scope of the constitution, and all means which are appropriate, which are plainly adapted to that end, which are not prohibited, but consist...
Page 71 - No political dreamer was ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the States, and of compounding the American people into one common mass.
Page 78 - The power to regulate commerce comprehends the control for that purpose, and to the extent necessary, of all the navigable waters of the United States which are accessible from a state other than those in which they lie. For this purpose, they are the public property of the nation, and subject to all the requisite legislation by Congress.
Page 22 - Surely we are sufficiently familiar with the actual processes and methods of monopoly and of the many hurtful restraints of trade to make definition possible, at any rate up to the limits of what experience has disclosed. These practices, being now abundantly disclosed, can be explicitly and item by item forbidden by statute in such terms as will practically eliminate uncertainty, the law itself and the penalty being made equally plain.
Page 76 - Union, shall have the right to construct, maintain. and operate lines of telegraph through and over any portion of the public domain of the United States, over and along any of the military or post roads of the United States...
Page 2 - That before any money shall be expended In the construction or test of any gun, gun carriage, ammunition, or Implements under the supervision of the said board, the board shall be satisfied after due Inquiry that the Government of the United States has a lawful right to use the Inventions involved In the...
Page 73 - The government which has a right to do an act, and has imposed on it the duty of performing that act, must, according to the dictates of reason, be allowed to select the means ; and those who contend that it may not select any appropriate means, that one particular mode of effecting the object is excepted, take upon themselves the burden of establishing that exception.
Page 142 - ... physical structure and a proper discharge of her maternal functions — having in view not merely her own health, but the well-being of the race — justify legislation to protect her from the greed as well as the passion of man.
Page 73 - If reference be had to its use in the common affairs of the world, or in approved authors, we find that it frequently imports no more than that one thing is convenient or useful or essential to another. To employ the means necessary to an end is generally understood as employing any means calculated to produce the end, and not as being confined to those single means, without which the end would be entirely unattainable.
Page 75 - Its exertion was but little called for, as commerce was then mostly conducted by water, and many of our statesmen entertained doubts as to the existence of the power to establish ways of communication by land. But since, in consequence of the expansion of the country, the multiplication of its products, and the invention of railroads and locomotion by steam, land transportation has so vastly increased, a sounder consideration of the subject has prevailed and led to the conclusion that Congress has...

Bibliographic information