The Treasury of Knowledge and Library Reference

Front Cover
Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, & Longmans, 1853 - Classical dictionaries
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Clerkenwell
23
Bank of England
24
Kings Bench
26
May
40
Commerce use of Money Coins Banking System Internal Navigation c
45
100
48
Senator
49
King of the Romans
50
He may pay too Dear for his Interments and Churchyards 216
52
October
53
Discoveries and Inventions
55
Ablutions of the Romans on the Anchors
59
Domestic Telegraph
60
Send him to Coventry
61
Banshee
65
Downs
68
Fountains
69
Clocks Electrical
70
Seven Oaks
76
Bantams
77
Coal origin
81
Rise and Progress of the Stage Origin of various Popular Plays Songs c
84
Swan theatre
88
Dramatic Censorship
89
Actors making a trade of their Andrew Saint Wardrobe 294
90
Universities Colleges Schools Public Libraries Religious Sects Nicene
97
Drinking healths
98
Pembroke College Cambridge
99
Adelphi
100
Baptism
103
Oriel College
106
Charity Schools
107
Parliaments Magna Charta Trial by Jury Feudal Laws Public Courts
110
Tailor
112
Coin
117
Meal Tub Plot
119
Telegraph printing
129
Titles Dignities Orders and Insignia Heralds and Origin of various Royal
132
Baron
137
Coins of Edward VI
144
Protestants
146
Sheriff
147
Kings Cockcrower
148
Coldstream Guards
151
Ottoman Empire
154
Mediatised Princes
155
Algernon
157
Commons House
158
Drydens celebrated Ode 95 Families noble origin of
160
Literal Signification of the Principal Male and Female Christian Names
161
Merryandrew
163
Christmas
165
Duchy of Lancaster Court 128 Fandango
169
Duck and Drake
176
Remarkable Customs Popular Observances
177
Kissing the Popes Foot
182
Duke
187
Outlawry
195
Alkali
197
Compass Mariners
202
Bartholomew Fair
206
All Hallows Barking
209
All Hallows Staining
216
Time and its Divisions Era Months Weeks Days c
217
All Saints
225
Palm Sunday
232
Agriculture Horticulture Vegetables Fruits Plants Flowers Beverages c
234

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 213 - The insurance offices one and all shut up shop. People built slighter and slighter every day, until it was feared that the very science of architecture would in no long time be lost to the world. Thus this custom of firing houses continued...
Page 212 - The ears of Ho-ti tingled with horror. He cursed his son, and he cursed himself that ever he should beget a son that should eat burnt pig. Bo-bo, whose scent was wonderfully sharpened since morning, soon raked out another pig, and fairly rending it asunder, thrust the lesser half by main force into the fists of Ho-ti, still shouting out, 'Eat, eat, eat the burnt pig, father, only taste — O Lord!
Page 25 - When thou buildest a new house, then thou shalt make a battlement for thy roof, that thou bring not blood upon thine house, if any man fall from thence.
Page 213 - ... pronounced, when the foreman of the jury begged that some of the burnt pig, of which the culprits stood accused, might be handed into the box. He handled it, and they all handled it, and burning their fingers, as Bo-bo and his father had done before them, and nature prompting to each of them the same remedy, against the face of all the facts, and the clearest charge which judge had ever given — to the surprise of the whole court, townsfolk, strangers, reporters, and all present — without...
Page 130 - Caesar had his Brutus — Charles the First, his Cromwell — and George the Third'* — (' Treason,' cried the speaker — ' Treason, treason !' echoed from every part of the house.
Page 213 - Ho-ti himself, which was the more remarkable, instead of chastising his son, seemed to grow more indulgent to him than ever. At length they were watched, the terrible mystery discovered, and father and son summoned to take their trial at Pekin, then an inconsiderable assize town.
Page 211 - I take to be the elder brother) was accidentally discovered in the manner following. The swine-herd, Ho-ti, having gone out into the woods one morning, as his manner was, to collect mast for his hogs, left his cottage in the care of his eldest son Bo-bo, a great lubberly boy, who being fond of playing with fire, as...
Page 425 - Smith (?'), they be made good cheap in this kingdom ; for whosoever studieth the laws of the realm, who studieth in the universities, who professeth the liberal sciences, and, (to be short,) who can live idly, and without manual labour, and will bear the port, charge, and countenance of a gentleman, he shall be called master, and shall be taken for a gentleman.
Page 112 - No Freeman shall be taken, or imprisoned, or be disseised of his Freehold, or Liberties, or free Customs, or be outlawed, or exiled, or any otherwise destroyed; nor will we pass upon him, nor condemn him, but by lawful Judgment of his Peers, or by the Law of the Land.
Page 96 - I waked one morning in the beginning of last June from a dream, of which all I could recover was, that I had thought myself in an ancient castle (a very natural dream for a head filled like mine with Gothic story) and that on the uppermost bannister of a great staircase I saw a gigantic hand in armour. In the evening I sat down and began to write, without knowing in the least what I intended to say or relate.

Bibliographic information