The British Colonies: Their History, Extent, Condition and Resources, Volume 4

Front Cover
London Printing and Publishing Company, 1850 - Dummies (Bookselling)
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 697 - For every gallon of such spirits or strong Waters, of any strength not exceeding the strength of proof by Sykes's hydrometer, and so in proportion for any greater or less strength than the strength of proof, and for any greater or less quantity than a gallon, viz.
Page 574 - Victoria is bounded on the north and north-east by a straight line drawn from Cape Howe to the nearest source of the river Murray, thence by the course of that river to the eastern boundary of South Australia, or 141 E.
Page 622 - ... raised in every part of this realm ; which things thus used be principally to the high displeasure of Almighty God, to the decay of the hospitality of this realm, to the diminishing of the king's people, and to the let of the cloth making, whereby many poor people have been accustomed to be set on work ; and in conclusion, if remedy be not found, it may turn to the utter destruction and desolation of this realm, which God defend.
Page 622 - Sussex, lately deceased, was not put in, wrapt up, or wound up, or buried in any shirt, shift, sheet, or shroud, made or mingled with flax, hemp, silk, hair, gold, or silver, or other than what is made of sheep's wool only...
Page 713 - ... strewed with wrecks — the hills and borders of the rivers studded with deserted and half-finished buildings — bear witness to these consequences, and speak of brave men, delicate females, and helpless children perishing by hundreds on a desert coast from want of food, of shelter, and even of water, and surrounded by armed hordes of angry savages.
Page 710 - ... all the land not so cultivated or improved, into the public chest of the settlement; and, at the expiration of seven years more, so much of the whole grant as should remain in an uncultivated or unimproved state was to revert absolutely to the Crown.
Page 579 - ... or less distant, form the nucleus of a new and flourishing settlement, interchanging with the districts at present occupied in the vicinity of Sydney many articles of internal commerce, and contributing to expedite the general occupation, by the people of this kingdom or their descendants, of those vast territories in which our national wealth and industry have already, in the last half century, converted an unproductive waste into two great and flourishing provinces. In producing and multiplying...
Page 578 - Providence, and the latter would certainly require more labour than can at present be obtained in the colony, or immigration profitably supply. Independently of these powerful reasons for allowing dispersion, it is not to be disguised that the government is unable to prevent it. No adequate measures could be resorted to for the general, and permanent removal of intruders from waste lands, without incurring probably a greater expense than would be sufficient to extend a large share of the control...
Page 667 - Then answered I them, and said unto them, "The God of heaven, he will prosper us; therefore we his servants will arise and build : but ye have no portion, nor right, nor memorial, in Jerusalem.
Page 579 - The motives which are urging mankind, especially in these days of general peace and increasing population, to break through the restraints which would forbid their settling themselves and their families in such situations, are too strong to be encountered with effect by ordinary means. To engage in such a struggle would be wholly irrational. All that remains for the government in such circumstances, is to assume the guidance and direction of enterprizes, which, though it cannot prevent or retard,...

Bibliographic information