A Short History of England: For School Use

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 216 - Be of good comfort, master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 85 - This England never did, (nor never shall,) Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror, But when it first did help to wound itself. Now these her princes are come home again, Come the three corners of the world in arms, And we shall shock them : Nought shall make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true.
Page 218 - With all the virtues that attend the good, Shall still be doubled on her : truth shall nurse her, Holy and heavenly thoughts still counsel her : She shall be loved and fear'd : her own shall bless her ; Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn, And hang their heads with sorrow : good grows with her.
Page 289 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 194 - ... had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, he would not have given me over in my gray hairs.
Page 361 - When France in wrath her giant-limbs upreared, And with that oath, which smote air, earth, and sea, Stamped her strong foot and said she would be free, Bear witness for me, how I hoped and feared!
Page 409 - Stay ; we have on our hands a sick man — a very sick man : it will be, I tell you frankly, a great misfortune if, one of these days, he should slip away from us, especially before all necessary arrangements were made.
Page 235 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a King of England too...
Page 287 - Give them consistency of judgment, one heart, and mutual love ; and go on to deliver them, and with the work of reformation ; and make the Name of Christ glorious in the world. Teach those who look too much on Thy instruments, to depend more upon Thyself.
Page 36 - No, by the splendour of God — have I fought men Like Harold and his brethren, and his guard Of English. Every man about his king Fell where he stood. They loved him : and, pray God My Normans may but move as true with me To the door of death. Of one self-stock at first, Make them again one people — Norman, English ; And English, Norman ; — we should have a hand To grasp the world with, and a foot to stamp it ... Flat.

Bibliographic information