Mechanics' Magazine, Volume 64

Front Cover
Knight & Lacey, 1856 - Technology
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 35 - ... privy council, that this our grant is contrary to law, or prejudicial or inconvenient to our subjects in general, or that the said invention is not a new invention as to the public use and exercise thereof...
Page 6 - held an opinion, almost amounting to conviction, in common, I believe,. with many other lovers of natural knowledge, that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, into one another, and possess equivalents of power in their action.
Page 7 - They give the diamagnetic the power of rotating the ray ; and the law of this action on light is, that if a magnetic line of force be going from a north pole or coming from a south pole, along the path of a polarized ray coming to the observer, it will rotate that ray to the right hand ; or, that if such a line of force be coming from a north pole or going from a south pole, it will rotate such a ray to the left hand.
Page 220 - The experiment is now repeated, the wire between the balls having been removed, and therefore the "tip" or the raising of the weight, is performed by the electrical repulsion and attraction of the two pairs of balls ; at 22 discharges of the unit jar the balance is subverted, and one knob drops upon the other, but no discharge takes place, showing that some electricity has been lost, or converted into the mechanical power which raises the balance. By another mode of expression the electricity may...
Page 6 - Nicol's eye-piece revolving on a horizontal axis, so as to be easily examined by the latter. Between the polarizing mirror and the eye-piece two powerful electromagnetic poles were arranged, being either the poles of a horse-shoe magnet or the contrary poles of two cylinder magnets ; they were separated from each other about two inches in the direction of the line of the ray, and so placed that, if on the same side of the polarized ray, it might pass near them ; or, if on contrary sides, it might...
Page 6 - ... that the various forms under which the forces of matter are made manifest have one common origin; or, in other words, are so directly related and mutually dependent, that they are convertible, as it were, one into another, and possess equivalents of power in their action.
Page 197 - Wulf and deployed these aircraft to units whose mission it was to approach the bombers as close as possible and, if weapons did not succeed, to ram the enemy aircraft.
Page 155 - The magnecrystallic force appears to be very clearly distinguished from either the magnetic or diamagnetic forces, in that it causes neither approach nor recession ; consisting not in attraction or repulsion, but in its giving a certain determinate position to the mass under its influence...
Page 391 - The metal is a conductor; but how can this be, except space be a conductor? for it is the only continuous part of the metal, and the atoms not only do not touch (by the theory), but as we shall see presently, must be assumed to be a considerable way apart. Space therefore must be a conductor, or else the metals could not conduct, but would be in the situation of the black sealing-wax referred to a little while ago.
Page 199 - A few years ago magnetism was to us an occult power, affecting only a few bodies. Now it is found to influence all bodies, and to possess the most intimate relations with electricity, heat, chemical action, light, crystallisation, and through it with the forces concerned in cohesion.

Bibliographic information