Great Lakes Car Ferries: Hearings ... on S. 619, Feb. 20, 26, 1935

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 1 - That no merchandise shall be transported by water, or by land and water, on penalty of forfeiture thereof, between points in the United States, including Districts, Territories, and possessions thereof embraced within the coastwise laws, either directly or via a foreign port, or for any part of the transportation, in any other vessel than a vessel built in and documented under the laws of the United States...
Page 2 - That the provisions of this act shall apply to any common carrier or carriers engaged in the transportation of passengers or property wholly by railroad, or partly by railroad and partly by water when both are used, under a common control, management, or arrangement, for a continuous carriage or shipment...
Page 2 - To establish through routes and maximum joint rates between and over such rail and water lines, and to determine all the terms and conditions under which such lines shall be operated in the handling of the traffic embraced.
Page 2 - No merchandise shall be transported by water under penalty of forfeiture thereof from one port of the United States to another port of the United States, either directly or via a foreign port, or for any part of the voyage, in any other vessel than a vessel of the United States.
Page 1 - States; or (b) if the majority of the voting power in such corporation is not vested in citizens of the United States; or (c) if through any contract or understanding it is so arranged that the majority of the voting power may be exercised, directly or indirectly, in behalf of any person who is not a citizen of the United States...
Page 3 - Act, as amended, is amended by striking out the period at the end thereof and inserting in lieu thereof a colon and the following : "Provided further, That...
Page 2 - There has been no taking of petitioner's property. It established its business under foreign domination, subject to the power of Congress to regulate it, and in the face of a long established national policy to restrict such foreign control of coastwise shipping. The amendment of the statute, so as to include within its prohibition the particular form of foreign control to which petitioner was subject, was no more arbitrary, burdensome or unreasonable than that involved in the statutes prohibiting...

Bibliographic information