Minutes of Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Volume 133, Part 3

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 397 - The tests of electrical cooking apparatus detailed in this paper were made with the hope of obtaining a method of cooking that would be satisfactory, with a minimum risk of fire, in a college which is supplied with electricity for lighting and power at a pressure of 110 volts. Experiments were carried out with the following apparatus : — 1 oven, 13...
Page 441 - That in the case of a steam engine, the heat supplied be calculated as the total heat of the steam entering the engine less the water heat of the same weight of water at the temperature of the engine exhaust, both quantities being reckoned from 32 degrees Fahrenheit.
Page 415 - ... of manganese. Some of the results obtained with an annealed ring, having an internal diameter of 3-2 cm., an external diameter of 4-5 cm., and a depth of 2'6 cm., are given in the following table : — The author points out that an induction-density of 15,270 for H=9-24 is higher than he remembers having seen. Very noteworthy is the apparent magnetic instability of the iron under certain conditions. It is well shown by the following experiment. The magnetic force was changed from its maximum...
Page 398 - ... per ton gives a cost of 3'15 cents per meal, showing the cost of cooking by coal to be about 19 per cent, of the cost of cooking by electricity. The author also gives data relating to the cost of ironing by electricity. The results of the cooking tests seem to indicate that, for the usual cooking of a family for the whole year, the expense would be larger than would be ordinarily acceptable notwithstanding the great advantages in other respects. The author considers that in a number of cases...
Page 448 - ... should also be given. (3) That for scientific purposes the thermal units that would be required by a perfect steam-engine working under the same conditions as the actual engine should also be stated. The proposed method of statement is applicable to engines using superheated steam, as well as to those using saturated steam, and the objection to the use of pounds of feedwater, which contain more or less thermal units according to conditions, is obviated ; while there is no more practical difficulty...
Page 405 - Another tube, of the same electrolytic copper, became similarly " pitted " when used for conveying sea-water. When these were replaced by tubes of ordinary copper, there was no further trouble. During the past six years some very remarkable instances of the failure of alloys have come to my notice, particularly with regard to wires of german-silver and platinoid used in the construction of resistance-coils. Specimens of these wires, insulated with white silk, were submitted...
Page 398 - ... electrical cooking utensils should be great ; for instance : — (1) For light housekeeping, where coal, oil, gas, or gasoline are frequently used ; (2) An electrical stove of 300 to 400 watts, to replace the frequently-used alcohol name ; (3) In the shop the glue-pot, solder-pot, brazing-iron, etc. can be heated advantageously by electricity. Other cases are also mentioned. The general results of the tests were of such a nature that the writer is warranted in the belief that if Central Station...
Page 447 - ... cases when the stopvalve is purposely used for reducing the pressure. In such cases the temperature of the steam at the reduced pressure shall be substituted. In the case of saturated steam the temperature corresponding to the pressure can be taken. Lower limit : the temperature in the exhaust-pipe close to, but outside, the engine. The temperature corresponding to the pressure of the exhaust steam can be taken. 5. That a standard...
Page 448 - That the statement of the economy of a steam-engine in terms of pounds of feed-water per horse-power per hour is undesirable. (2) That for all purposes, except those of a scientific nature, it is desirable to state the economy of a steam-engine in terms of the thermal units required per...
Page 447 - ... working on the Rankine cycle between the same temperature and pressure limits as the actual engine to be compared. 6. That the ratio between the thermal efficiency of an actual engine and the thermal efficiency of the corresponding standard steam engine of comparison be called the efficiency ratio.

Bibliographic information