Journal of the American Society of Naval Engineers, Inc, Volume 37

Front Cover
American Society of Naval Engineers., 1925 - Marine engineering
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 267 - NAVAL POLICY To create, maintain, and operate a navy second to none and in conformity with treaty provisions.
Page 347 - Guard, which shall constitute a part of the military forces of the United States and which shall operate under the Treasury Department in time of peace and operate as a part of the Navy, subject to the orders of the Secretary of the Navy, in time of war or when the President shall so direct.
Page 207 - ... and five mixture. All tanks shall be buried under ground with the tops of the tanks at least two (2) feet below the immediate surrounding surface and below the level of any piping to which the tank may be connected. In lieu of the two (2) feet covering, the tanks may be buried beneath twelve (12) inches of tamped earth or sand over which shall be placed a slab of reinforced concrete not less than four (4) inches thick extending at least twelve (12) inches beyond the outline of the tank in all...
Page 430 - Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, and the Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education.
Page 254 - The other elements have their important, and at times indispensable, functions. 268. From time to time apparent threats to the supremacy of the battleship have appeared. Each has resulted in some modification of its design and in the methods of its employment in war, but its supremacy remains.
Page 355 - Belgian engineer, who presented a paper describing his apparatus before a joint meeting of the Institution of Chemical Engineers and the Chemical Engineering Group of the Society of Chemical Industry, at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, in London, on February 11.
Page 254 - The Navy of the United States should be maintained in sufficient strength to support its policies and its commerce, and to guard its continental and overseas possessions.
Page 255 - From time to time apparent threats to the supremacy of the battleship have appeared. Each has resulted in some modification of its design and in the methods of its employment in war, but its supremacy remains. 269. With the invention and development of offensive weapons have always come the...
Page 268 - To create, maintain, and operate a navy second to none, and in conformity with the ratios for capital ships established by the treaty for limitation of naval armament. To make war efficiency the object of all training and to maintain that efficiency during the entire period of peace. To develop and to organize the Navy for operations in any part of either ocean. To make strength of the Navy for battle of primary importance. To make .strength of the Navy for exercising ocean-wide economic pressure...
Page 428 - Md., in 1870, and received his early education in the public schools of that city.

Bibliographic information