Page images
PDF
EPUB

And whereas a Treaty was concluded on the 26th day of September, 1898, between Her Majesty and the Queen of the Netherlands, for the mutual extradition of fugitive criminals, which Treaty is in the terms following:

[See Page 715.]

And whereas the ratifications of the said Treaty were exchanged at London on the 14th day of December, 1898.

Now, therefore, Her Majesty, by and with the advice of Her Privy Council, and in virtue of the authority committed to Her by the said recited Acts, doth order, and it is hereby ordered, that from and after the 14th day of March, 1899, the said Acts shall apply in the case of the Netherlands, and of the said Treaty with the Queen of the Netherlands.

Provided always, that the operation of the said Acts, shall be and remain suspended within the Dominion of Canada, so long as an Act of the Parliament of Canada passed in 1886, and entitled "An Act respecting the Extradition of Fugitive Criminals," shall continue in force there, and no longer.

A. W. FITZROY.

AGREEMENT concerning the Telegraphic Correspondence between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland_and_the Netherlands, over the direct Submarine Cables. Signed at London, February 13, 1899, and at The Hague, March 13, 1899.

By virtue of Article XVII of the International Telegraph Convention of St. Petersburgh of 10/22nd July, 1875,* the Undersigned, subject to the approval of the respective Governments, if required, have agreed as follows:

I. Until otherwise mutually agreed, the charge for ordinary telegrams exchanged between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Netherlands, shall be fixed uniformly by word, viz., in the United Kingdom at 2d., in the Netherlands at 10 cents, with a minimum of 10d. per telegram in the United Kingdom, and 50 cents in the Netherlands.

From the amount per word collected by the State Telegraph Administration of each country of origin, there shall be deducted, from the 1st of January, 1897, 10 centimes as cablerate to be equally divided between the two State Telegraph Administrations; 6 centimes, as terminal rate for the United Kingdom, and 4 centimes as terminal rate for the Netherlands. Each State Telegraph Administration shall retain the

* See Vol. 14. Page 95.

entire sum which it shall have collected, including the charges for reply-paid telegrams and other accessory charges.

Nevertheless the United Kingdom shall credit the Netherlands with 9 centimes per word, in respect of British-Netherland telegrams, transmitted to the Netherlands, and the Netherlands shall credit the United Kingdom with 11 centimes per word, in respect of British-Netherland telegrams transmitted to the United Kingdom.

The minimum charge of 10d. or 50 cents per telegram shall be divided in the proportion of 11 cents for the United Kingdom and 9 cents for the Netherlands.

II. British-Netherland telegrams which at the request of the sender are diverted from the direct route, shall be subject to the rates and provisions of the International Telegraph Convention of St. Petersburgh and of the Service Regulations thereto annexed.

British-Netherland telegrams which in consequence of interruption of the direct route between the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, are sent over the system of any other Administration, shall not be subjected to any additional charge, the cost of transit over the system of such other Administration being borne by the State Telegraph Administration whose land lines are interrupted, and by the British and Netherland Administrations jointly in case the submarine cables shall be interrupted.

Nothing in this Article is to be interpreted as affecting the liberty of the United Kingdom to enter into arrangements with France, Belgium, or Germany, or all of them, for the due apportionment of the moneys derived from the cable-rates on messages passing over the British-French, British-Belgian, and British-German cables, or as nullifying any right, which, by reason of her ownership in these cables, she may herself possess, to receive a portion, or the whole, of the moneys in question.

III. The provisions of the International Telegraph Convention of St. Petersburgh and of the Service Regulations thereto annexed, as already revised or as they may be revised by future International Conferences, are declared applicable to the intercourse between the United Kingdom and the Netherlands in all that is not regulated by the present Agreement.

IV. The United Kingdom charges itself at the joint expense of the two countries with the care of the proper maintenance of the cables, and shall for this purpose keep at its disposal a suitable cable-ship and the necessary cable.

As bire of the cable-ship, including the cost of the crew, and of all costs of damage or other marine casualties to the ship, the Netherlands shall pay to the United Kingdom, during the time that the ship is in commission for the repair of the

submarine cables, 377. 10s. sterling per day, or such higher sum as may be mutually agreed upon.

Moreover the two countries shall pay in equal shares the further cost of cable, cable-stores, coals, mooring, unmooring, pilotage, and dues, &c.

If at any time it should be necessary to hire a cable-ship in consequence of the cable-ship belonging to the British State Telegraph Administration not being available, the cost of hiring shall be borne equally by the two countries.

V. The present Agreement shall be considered to have come into force at the same time as the Convention between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Netherlands concerning the purchase by the Netherlands of one half of the property in the two cables from Lowestoft and from Benacre to Zandvoort.*

It shall remain in force for an indefinite time, and for a term of six months from the day on which it shall have been denounced by one of the Contracting Parties.

Done in duplicate and signed at London, on the 13th February, 1899, and at The Hague on the 13th March, 1899.

(L.S.) NORFOLK, Postmaster-General of the United

Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. (L.S.) HAVELAAR, Directeur-Generaal der Posterijen en Telegraphie.

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES to the Convention between Great Britain and the Netherlands, dated the 7th-14th of October, 1871.† (Telegraph Money Orders.) Signed at London, July 19, and at The Hague, September 13, 1899.‡

THE Postmaster-General of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Director-General of Posts and Telegraphs in the Kingdom of the Netherlands have agreed as follows:

ART. I. Telegraph Money Orders for sums not exceeding the maximum amount allowed in the case of ordinary Money Orders shall be exchanged between the Netherlands and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

II. The sender of a Telegraph Money Order shall be required to pay, in addition to the commission to be fixed, and retained by the country of origin, the cost of a telegram of advice from one country to the other.

*See Page 713. + Sce Vol. 13. Page 659.

Signed also in Dutch.

III. The telegram of advice shall be in the French language, and shall be forwarded from the Office at which the Order is issued to the Office at which it is payable, the following form being adopted:

Mandat

Postes...........

+paie

(Number of the order).

(Office of payment).
‡pour

* Name of the remitter or remitters, in accordance with the regulations for ordinary money orders.

+ Amount in figures and words in the money of the country of payment. Name and address in full of the payee or payees, in accordance with the regulations applying to ordinary money orders.

IV. The Telegraph Money Orders, or the corresponding advices of the same, shall be delivered to the payees in accordance with the provisions of the Service Regulations for the execution of the International Telegraph Convention of St. Petersburgh.

V. The apportionment of the amounts received for telegrams of advice (Article III) shall accord with the regulations respecting the apportionment of amounts received for ordinary telegrams.

VI. As in the case of ordinary Money Orders, the Administration of the country of issue shall account to the Administration of the country of payment for 1 per cent. on the amount of Telegraph Money Orders paid. To this end, the Telegraph Money Orders shall be entered separately by the respective Offices of Exchange at the end of the Advice Lists for ordinary Money Orders, with the heading "Advised by Telegraph."

VII. In cases of fictitious orders in which it may be impossible to determine in which country a fraud may have been committed, the responsibility for any losses involved shall be shared equally by the Dutch and British Postal Administrations.

VIII. In other respects Telegraph Money Orders shall be subject to the same general conditions as ordinary Money Orders.

IX. The provisions of the above Additional Articles shall come into operation on the 1st of October, 1899.

Done in duplicate and signed at London on the 19th of July, 1899, and at The Hague on the 13th of September, 1899.

(L.S.) NORFOLK.
(L.S.) DE BLOEME.

NORWAY.

AGREEMENT between the British and Norwegian Post Offices concerning the Exchange of Parcels by Parcel Post. Signed at Christiania, September 8, and at London, September 18, 1900.

THE Post Office of Great Britain and Ireland and the Postal Administration of Norway agree to effect a regular exchange of parcels between the United Kingdom and Norway on the basis of the Parcel Post Convention of Washington of the 15th of June, 1897.*

The following Regulations shall be generally applicable, not only to parcels exchanged direct between the United Kingdom and Norway, but also to parcels sent in transit to or from one of the two countries through the other :

ART. I.-1. Parcels may be forwarded by Parcel Post from the United Kingdom to Norway up to the weight of 11 lbs. English, and from Norway to the United Kingdom up to the weight of 5 kilogrammes.

2. The parcels thus exchanged may be insured up to the sum of 3,000 francs.

II-1. The two Post Offices guarantee the right of transit for parcels over their territory to or from any country with which they respectively have Parcel Post communication; and they undertake responsibility for transit parcels within the limits determined by Article XI below.

2. In the absence of any arrangement to the contrary between the Administrations concerned the conveyance of parcels thus exchanged between countries not contiguous will be effected à découvert.

III. The prepayment of the postage on parcels shall be compulsory, except in the case of re-directed parcels.

IV.-1. The Post Office of the country of origin shall pay to the Post Office of the country of destination the territorial postage of the latter and also the sea postage if the latter office provides for the sea service, calculated in accordance with the following table :

[blocks in formation]
« PreviousContinue »