Practical remarks on infant education, by dr. and miss [E.] Mayo

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - But foolish and unlearned questions avoid, knowing that they do gender strifes ; and the servant of the Lord must not strive, but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient, in meekness instructing those that oppose themselves ; if God peradventure will give them repentance to the acknowledging of the truth...
Page 78 - As, it is usually managed, it is a dreadful task indeed to learn, and if possible a more dreadful task to teach to read: with the help of counters, and coaxing, and gingerbread, or by dint of reiterated pain and terror, the names of the...
Page 3 - English language with a view to their temporal welfare; but they thereby become better acquainted with good principles. No deceitful methods are used to bring them over to the saving doctrines of Christ, though the most earnest wishes are entertained that they may all come to the knowledge of God, and of Jesus Christ whom he hath sent.
Page 16 - God's blessing, the spiritual father of a numerous race. He must be a man of prayer ; no human power can accomplish the work before him ; he must look, and steadfastly look, to those everlasting hills from whence cometh his help. With prayer must he gird himself for his work, in the spirit of prayer must he carry it on, in the incense of prayer must the offering of his day's exertion ascend before the throne.
Page 17 - He shall not contend, nor cry out, neither shall any man hear his voice in the streets. The bruised reed he shall not break, and smoking flax he shall not extinguish, till he send forth judgment unto victory.
Page 17 - ... cometh his help. With prayer must he gird himself for his work, in the spirit of prayer must he carry it on, in the incense of prayer must the offering of his day's exertion ascend before the throne. He must be a man mighty in the Scriptures, line must be upon line...
Page 39 - ... we owe to them, bring before them the claims of their companions — of their master — of their parents — of God. Teach them to consider their actions in reference to these claims, and see that they not only acknowledge the principle, but that they carry it out into practice ; for it is essential, whilst awakening feelings and instilling principles, to cultivate moral habits; and habits are formed by the frequent repetition of an action.
Page 49 - The child buys fruit and cakes at the stall or shop, of which the keeper takes pains to form a familiar acquaintance with him, by conversation, artful it must be called in this case, but such as is used by all good teachers in order to gain a pupil's confidence. He passes the shop one day without money, and is invited to help himself upon trust. If he yield to the first temptation, it is all over with him. Considering his previous acquaintance with the tempter, it is almost a matter of course that...
Page 49 - ... At length she guides him to the first step in crime, by complaining of want of money, perhaps threatening to apply to his parents, and suggesting that he may easily repay her by taking some trifling article from his master's shop. The first robbery committed, the chances are a thousand to one that the thief will sooner or later be transported or hanged. He goes on robbing his master or perhaps his parents : the woman disposes of the stolen property, giving him only a moderate share of the money...
Page 48 - Another class of seducers consists of both men and women, but principally of old women, -the keepers of fruit-stalls and small cakeshops, which stalls and shops they keep but as a cloak to their real trade, — that of persuading children to become thieves, and receiving goods stolen by children. The methods of seduction pursued by these people are for the most part similar to those adopted by the class mentioned above; but they are distinguished from the thieves by some peculiarities. Residing always...

Bibliographic information