Canadian Naturalist and Quarterly Journal of Science, Volume 5

Front Cover
Dawson., 1870 - Geology
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 327 - The accuracy of these experiments has been alternately denied and affirmed. Supposing them to be accepted, however, all that they really. proved was that the treatment to which the air was subjected destroyed something that was essential to the development of life in the infusion. This " something " might be gaseous, fluid, or solid; that it consisted of germs remained only an hypothesis of greater or less probability. Contemporaneously with these investigations a remarkable discovery was made by...
Page 333 - But expectation is permissible where belief is not; and if it were given to me to look beyond the abyss of geologically recorded time to the still more remote period when the earth was passing through physical and chemical conditions, which it can no more see again than a man can recall his infancy, I should expect to be a witness of the evolution of living protoplasm from not living matter.
Page 436 - Physiology has sufficiently decisive grounds for the opinion, that every motion, every manifestation of force, is the result of a transformation of the structure or of its substance...
Page 326 - But the great tragedy of Science — the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact...
Page 339 - Panhistophyton is generated. If it may be generated by Abiogenesis, or by Xenogenesis, within the silkworm or its moth, the extirpation of the disease must depend upon the prevention of the occurrence of the conditions under which this generation takes place. But if, on the other hand, the...
Page 335 - ... of an inch in diameter, which are made visible in the lymph by the microscope. Similar experiments have proved that two of the most destructive of epizootic diseases, sheep-pox and glanders, are also dependent for their existence and their propagation upon extremely small living solid particles, to which the title of microzym.es is applied.
Page 234 - ... the sand. The peduncle, which was about six times the length of the shell, being encased in a sand tube differing in no respect from the sand tubes of neighboring annelids. In many instances the peduncle was broken in sifting them from the sand, yet the wound was quickly healed and a new sand-tube promptly formed. When placed on the surface of the sand they were noticed to move quite freely, by the sliding motion, in all directions, of the dorsal and ventral plates, aided at the same time by...
Page 340 - It seems to me impossible to rise from the perusal of those publications without a strong conviction that the lamentable mortality which so frequently dogs the footsteps of the most skilful operator, and those deadly consequences of wounds and injuries which seem to haunt the very walls of great hospitals, and...
Page 325 - ... activities by which they are distinguished from not living matter. Each individual living organism is formed by their temporary combination. They stand to it in the relation of the particles of water to a cascade, or a whirlpool ; or to a mould, into which the water is poured. The form of the organism is thus determined by the reaction between external conditions and the inherent activities of the organic molecules of which it is composed ; and, as the stoppage of a whirlpool destroys nothing...
Page 340 - And as to the equivalent of Redi's thought in life, how can we over-estimate the value of that knowledge of the nature of epidemic and epizootic diseases, and consequently of the means of checking, or eradicating, them, the dawn of which has assuredly commenced...

Bibliographic information