The Masonic magazine, suppl. to 'The Freemason'. [Continued as] The Masonic monthly

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 38 - THERE is no flock, however watched and tended, But one dead lamb is there ! There is no fireside, howsoe'er defended, But has one vacant chair ! The air is full of farewells to the dying, And mournings for the dead; The heart of Rachel, for her children crying, Will not be comforted...
Page 38 - Lo ! in that house of misery A lady with a lamp I see Pass through the glimmering gloom, And flit from room to room. And slow, as in a dream of bliss, The speechless sufferer turns to kiss Her shadow, as it falls Upon the darkening walls.
Page 38 - Let us be patient ! These severe afflictions Not from the ground arise, But oftentimes celestial benedictions Assume this dark disguise.
Page 358 - Brescia, who lived at the end of the fifteenth and beginning of the sixteenth century, and died 1510, at Bergamo, at a very advanced age.
Page 139 - Kill not — for Pity's sake — and lest ye slay The meanest thing upon its upward way. Give freely and receive, but take from none By greed, or force or fraud, what is his own. Bear not false witness, slander not, nor lie ; Truth is the speech of inward purity. Shun drugs and drinks which work the wit abuse ; Clear minds, clean bodies, need no Soma juice.
Page 72 - Upon the report of this adventure, the country people soon came with lights to the sepulchre, and discovered that the statue, which was made of brass, was nothing more than a piece of clock-work ; that the floor of the vault was all loose, and underlaid with several springs, which upon any man's entering, naturally produced that which had happened.
Page 38 - O TRAVELLER, stay thy weary feet ; Drink of this fountain, pure and sweet ; It flows for rich and poor the same. Then go thy way, remembering still The wayside well beneath the hill, The cup of water in his name.
Page 72 - He was immediately surprised by a sudden blaze of light, and discovered a very fair vault : at the upper end of it was a statue of a man in armour sitting by a table, and leaning on his left arm. He held a truncheon in his right hand, and had a lamp burning before him. The man had no sooner set one foot within the vault than the statue, erecting itself from its leaning posture, stood bolt upright ; and upon the fellow's advancing another step, lifted up the truncheon in its right hand.
Page 72 - His curiosity, and the hopes of finding some hidden treasure, soon prompted him to force open the door. He was immediately surprised by a sudden blaze of light, and discovered a very fair vault: at the 'upper end of it was a statue of a man in armour sitting by a table, and leaning on his left arm: he held a truncheon in his right hand, and had a lamp burning before him. The man had no sooner set...
Page 108 - For a wall is made of stones, but a rampart, with which camps are fortified to repel the assaults of enemies, is made of sods, cut out of the earth, and raised above the ground all round like a wall, having in front of it the ditch whence the sods were taken, and strong stakes of wood fixed upon its top.

Bibliographic information