Page images
PDF
EPUB

Amendment No. 16—General provisions- Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, the Department of State: Deletes the House lan

Amendment No. 37–Departmental salaries original budget estimate for the State, guage as proposed by the Senate. The deand expenses: Appropriates $2,650,000 in- Justice, and

Justice, and Commerce bill totaled leted language has been inserted in the genstead of $2,750,000 as proposed by the House

$1,469,494,515. eral provisions for the entire bill.

and $2,500,000 as proposed by the Senate. Amendment No. 17–General provisions

The revised budget estimates totaled

Maritime activities Department of State: Reported in disagree

$1,272,234,262. ment.

Amendment No. 38—Ship construction The amount as passed the House was TITLE II—DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

(liquidation of contract authorization): $1,143,146,712.
Appropriates $59,000,000 as proposed by the

The total amount of the conference Legal activities and general administration Senate instead of $64,000,000 as proposed by bill is $1,086,645,601, which is a reduction

Amendment No. 18—Salaries and expenses, the House. general administration: Appropriates $2,495,- Amendment No. 39—Operating-differential

of $56,501,111 below the bill as passed the 000 as proposed by the House instead of $2,- subsidies: Appropriates $20,000,000 as pro

House. 375,000 as proposed by the Senate. posed by the Senate instead of $25,000,000 as

The bill in its present form is $382,Amendment No. 19-Salaries and expenses, proposed by the House.

848,914 below the original budget estigeneral legal activities: Appropriates $10,- Amendment No. 40—Salaries and expenses: mates. 160,000 as proposed by the House instead of Appropriates $15,500,000 as proposed by the Mr. Speaker, I yield to the gentleman $9,960,000 as proposed by the Senate.

Senate instead of $16,300,000 as proposed by from New York [Mr. ROONEY). Amendment No. 20—Fees and expenses of the House. witnesses: Appropriates $1,200,000 as pro

Mr. ROONEY. Mr. Speaker, I feel Amendment No. 41—Administrative ex

obliged to point out that the conference posed by the House instead of $1,000,000 as penses: Places a limitation of $7,200,000 on proposed by the Senate. administrative expenses as proposed by the

figure just cited by my friend and chairFederal prison system

Senate instead of $3,000,000 as proposed by man, the distinguished gentleman from Amendment No. 21—Salaries and expenses, the House.

Ohio includes at least $65 million in Bureau of Prisons: Appropriates $25,385,000 Amendments Nos. 42 and 43—State marine phony cuts. I know I can justify the instead of $25,770,000 as proposed by the schools: Appropriate $890,000 as proposed by words “phony cuts” because I refer to House and $25,000,000 as proposed by the

the Senate instead of $860,000 as proposed the $65 million taken out of the funds Senate.

by the House, of which $379,800 is for main- needed to pay for the Federal public Office of Alien Property

tenance and repair of vessels loaned by the roads program. That money has to be Amendment No. 22-Salaries and expenses:

United States instead of $349,800 as proposed paid, there is no question or doubt about

by the House. Authorizes $2,500,000 as proposed by the Sen

it. You are merely postponing the time ate instead of $3,500,000 as proposed by the

Bureau of Public Roads

of payment. There is not an ounce of House.

Amendment No. 44—Federal-aid highways: economy in such action. It has to catch General provisions-Department of Justice

Appropriates $475,000,000 as proposed by the up with you.

Senate instead of $510,000,000 as proposed Amendment No. 23-Section 202: Reported

by the House. in disagreement.

I am pleased that the conference comAmendment No. 24—Section 208: Reported

Amendment No. 45—Forest highways: Ap

mittee brings back in technical disagree

ment amendment No. 17, and that the. in disagreement.

propriates $15,000,000 as proposed by the

House instead of $14,000,000 as proposed by gentleman from Ohio will move that the TITLE III—DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE the Senate.

House recede and concur in that amendOffice of the Secretary

Amendment No. 46—Access roads (act of ment, which reads as follows: Amendment No. 25—Salaries and expenses: September 7, 1950): Appropriate $5,500,000

It is the sense of the Congress that the Appropriates $1,750,000 instead of $1,875,000 as proposed by the Senate instead of $7,500,

Communist Chinese Government should not as proposed by the House and $1,533,281 as 000 as proposed by the House.

be admitted to membership in the United proposed by the Senate.

National Bureau of Standards

Nations as a representative of China. Amendment No. 26–Salaries and expenses:

Amendment No. 47–Research and testing:
Reported in disagreement.

I trust that every Member of the House
Appropriates $3,000,000 as proposed by the
Bureau of the Census
House instead of $3,500,000 as proposed by this amendment on a roll call, and that

will be given an opportunity to vote on Amendment No. 27—Salaries and expenses: the Senate. Appropriates $6,770,000 as proposed by the Amendment No. 48-Radio propagation

48—Radio propagation there will not be a dissenting vote. House instead of $6,000,000 as proposed by and standards: Appropriates $2,000,000 as There was no dissenting vote in the other the Senate.

proposed by the House instead of $2,306,500 body at the time of the adoption of this Amendment No. 28—Censuses of Business as proposed by the Senate.

language. and Manufactures: Reported in disagree- Amendment No. 49—Working capital fund: Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, will ment.

Strikes out the Senate provision pertaining the gentleman yield? Amendment No. 29–Census of Agricul- to this item. ture: Strikes out the Senate provision for

Mr. ROONEY. I yield to the gentle

Weather Bureau this item.

man from Ohio. Amendment No. 50—Salaries and expenses:

Mr. CLEVENGER. I might agree Civil Aeronautics Administration Appropriates $27,000,000 as proposed by the about the phony cut of $65 million. I Amendment No. 30—Salaries and expenses: Senate instead of $24,700,000 as proposed by am only following the leadership of the Appropriates $105,000,000 instead of $105,- the House. 500,000 as proposed by the House and $104,

distinguished gentleman from New York

TITLE IV-CORPORATIONS 500,000 as proposed by the Senate.

in the years that he was chairman of this Amendment No. 31—Establishment of Air

Amendments Nos. 51 and 52—Inland Wa

committee. I would call it an educated terways Corporation: Authorize $480,000 for Navigation Facilities: Appropriates $7,000,000 administrative expenses as proposed by the

guess. as proposed by the House instead of $5,000,Senate instead of $240,000 as proposed by

Mr. ROONEY. Of course there is 000 as proposed by the Senate. Amendment No. 32-Technical develop

the House and places a limitation of $12,000 nothing inherently wrong in what you

for travel expenses as proposed by the Sen- are doing. It might be considered ment and evaluation: Appropriates $750,000

ate instead of $6,000 as proposed by the as proposed by the Senate instead of $1,000,

cricket. I just wanted to point out that House. 000 as proposed by the House.

it was a $65 million phony cut so every

TITLE V-GENERAL PROVISIONS Amendment No. 33—Construction, Wash

one would understand. After all, the ington National Airport: Appropriates $400,

Amendment No. 53: Inserts the Senate gentleman and his colleagues on that 000 as proposed by the House instead of provision, prohibiting the use of any appro- side of the aisle are now surrounded with $200,000 as proposed by the Senate. priation contained in this Act to pay ex

a halo of glory and righteousness. They Amendment No. 34—Federal aid airport penses incident to or in connection with par

are the champions of economy and all program, Federal Airport Act: Reported in ticipation in the International Materials

Conference. disagreement.

that is good. No one ever accused us of CLIFF CLEVENGER,

that. Amendment No. 35—Air navigation devel

F. R. COUDERT, Jr.,

Mr. CLEVENGER. We accept the acopment: Appropriates $1,085,000 as proposed

FRANK T. Bow,

colade. by the Senate instead of $1,500,000 as pro

SAM COON, posed by the House.

Mr. JAVITS. Mr. Speaker, will the

JOHN TABER,
Coast and Geodetic Survey

JOHN J. ROONEY,

gentleman yield? Amendment No. 36—Salaries and expenses:

PRINCE H. PRESTON,

Mr. ROONEY. I yield to the gentleAppropriates $12,000,000 as proposed by the

ROBERT L. F. SIKES,

man from New York. Senate instead of $12,200,000 as proposed by

CLARENCE CANNON,

Mr. JAVITS. What has happened to the House.

Managers on the Part of the House. the salaries and the expenses of the State Department? It is a little hard to The Clerk read as follows:

which brazenly went to war with the tell from this report. They were very Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House re- U. N. itself.

U. N. itself. Such action by the U. N. materially cut here. cede from its disagreement to the amend- would only

would only further weaken it and Mr. ROONEY. Of course.

ment of the Senate numbered 10, and concur strengthen those who are its enemiesMr. CLEVENGER. They are $65,600,- therein.

and ours. 000.

The motion was agreed to.

The Committee on Foreign Affairs isMr. Speaker, I move the previous ques

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report sued a carefully prepared report to tion.

the next amendment in disagreement. accompany House Concurrent Resolution The previous question was ordered.

The Clerk read as follows:

129. It sets forth the legal, moral, pracThe conference report was agreed to.

tical, and psychological reasons why the

Senate amendment No. 11: Page 6, line The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report 23, insert:

Congress should take this action rejectthe first amendment in disagreement.

“Section 602 of the Departments of State,

ing the Communist bid for U. N. memThe Clerk read as follows:

Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Ap- bership, which is one of its real goals in Senate amendment No. 1: Page 1, line 10, propriation Act, 1952, as amended (65 Stat. the Korean aggression. I ask unaniinsert the following: “the cost of transport- 599), is hereby amended as follows: At the mous consent to include the committee ing to and from a place of storage and the end of the second proviso in the first para- report herewith. I believe the argucost of storing the furniture and household graph and before the period, insert ', Carib- ments it presents are unanswerable. and personal effects of an employee of the bean Commission and the Joint Support pro

EXPRESSING THE SENSE OF THE CONGRESS THAT Foreign Service who is assigned to a post gram of the International Civil Aviation Orat which he is unable to use his furniture

THE CHINESE COMMUNISTS ARE NOT ENganization'."

TITLED TO AND SHOULD NOT BE RECOGNIZED and effects, under such regulations as the

Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr, Speaker, I TO REPRESENT CHINA IN THE UNITED Secretary may prescribe.” offer a motion.

NATIONS Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I The Clerk read as follows:

Mr. JUDD, from the Committee on Foreign move that the House recede and concur

Affairs, submitted the following report:

Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House rein the Senate amendment. cede from its disagreement to the amend

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to Mr. ROONEY. Mr. Speaker, will the ment of the Senate numbered 11, and con

whom was referred the concurrent resolution gentleman yield? cur therein.

(H. Con. Res. 129) expressing the sense of Mr. CLEVENGER. I yield to the gen

the Congress that the Chinese Communists The motion was agreed to.

are not entitled to and should not be recogtleman from New York.

nized to represent China in the United NaMr. ROONEY. This action on the part

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report the next amendment in disagreement.

tions, having considered the same, report of the committee would save the tax

favorably thereon without amendment and payers' dollars?

The Clerk read as follows:

recommend that the concurrent resolution Mr. CLEVENGER. Yes. That was Senate amendment No. 17: Page 15, line

do pass. the promise made and that is the rea23, insert:

The Congress, particularly the House of son for the motion.

"SEC. 111. It is the sense of the Congress Representatives, has shown a continuing The SPEAKER. The question is on

that the Communist Chinese Government concern that the United Nations might seat

should not be admitted to membership in a representative of the Chinese Communists the motion.

the United Nations as the representative of in place of the representative of the National The motion was agreed to. China."

Government of the Republic of China. This The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report

attitude by the Congress arises from an the next amendment in disagreement.

Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I understanding of the nature of the ComThe Clerk read as follows: offer a motion.

munist regime in China and its active par

The Clerk read as follows: Senate amendment No. 4: Page 4, line 5,

ticipation in the aggression against the Reinsert the following: "and in addition $15,

Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House re- public of Korea. In 1948 the committee's 600,000 of the unobligated balances of all cede from its disagreement to the amend

report on the strategy and tactics of world

communism included a special study on appropriations available to the Department ment of the Senate numbered 17, and concur therein.

communism in China. of State during fiscal year 1953 of which

The report stated latter amount not to exceed $5,600,000 may

that “Chinese communism is regular com

Mr. JUDD. Mr. Speaker, the Com- munism” and its adherents "have followed be used to cover the costs of reduction in force, including salaries, terminal leave, mittee on Foreign Affairs on July 10, faithfully every zigzag of the Kremlin's line

for a generation.” Less than 7 months after travel and transportation expenses of offi- 1953, unanimously reported out favor

the invasion of Korea the House approved a cers and employees whose services are ter- ably House Concurrent Resolution 129,

resolution urging the United Nations to “deminated, and travel and transportation costs which has the same purpose as the

clare the Chinese Communist authorities an in connection with transfers necessary as a Senate amendment which I am sure will result of reduction in force."

aggressor in Korea.” In May 1951, the House be concurred in unanimously by the passed a resolution expressing its view “that Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I Members of this House. Our committee the Chinese Communist authorities should move that the House recede and concur resolution, introduced by Chairman not be permitted to represent China in the in the Senate amendment with an CHIPERFIELD, was a modification of simi

United Nations." amendment. lar resolutions introduced on June 27,

This concern is presently heightened by The Clerk read as follows: 1953, by Hon. LAURIE C. BATTLE and Hon.

the truce negotiations that may be followed

by an armistice and a political settlement. Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House recede MARGUERITE STITT CHURCH. The resolu

It is reasonable to expect that the Chinese from its disagreement to the amendment of tion follows:

Communists may hold out for a seat in the the Senate numbered 4, and concur therein House Concurrent Resolution 129 United Nations as a quid pro quo for an with an amendment, as follows: In lieu of

Resolved by the House of Representatives

armistice or a political settlement. The purthe matter proposed by said amendment insert "and in addition $15,600,000 of the un(the Senate concurring), That it is the sense

pose of House Concurrent Resolution 129 is obligated balances of all appropriations availof the Congress that the Chinese Communists

to reaffirm earlier congressional expressions able to the Department of State during fisare not entitled to and should not be

on the subject. The genesis of House Conrecognized to represent China in the United

current Resolution 129 is House Resolution cal year 1953." Nations.

307 introduced by the Honorable LAURIE C.

BATTLE on June 27, 1953, and House ResoluThe motion was agreed to.

tion 308 introduced on the same day by the The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report the above resolution is more complete and

Mr. Speaker, I believe the language of

Honorable MARGUERITE STITT CHURCH. These the next amendment in disagreement. precise because it states the indisputable

resolutions were identical. They stated that The Clerk read as follows:

it is the sense of the House "that the Chireason why the Chinese Communists

nese Communist authorities should not be Senate amendment No. 10: Page 6, line 17, must be prevented from taking China's

admitted to membership in the United Nainsert:

seat in the United Nations, namely, they 'tions to represent China.” The subcom"PAYMENT TO THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA are not entitled to it. The U. N. was set mittee on the Far East and the Pacific, under “The Secretary of the Treasury shall cause up as an association of peace-loving na- the chairmanship of the Honorable WALTER to be paid annually out of any money in the tions. It is bad enough to have some

H. JUDD, considered both resolutions and Treasury not otherwise appropriated, $430,- in it from the start who later proved

recommended to the full committee a con000 as a payment to the Republic of Panama themselves unworthy. It would be plain

çurrent resolution with slightly altered lanin accordance with the treaty of 1936 (53 hypocrisy to admit, under the guise of a

guage. After a complete exploration by the Stat. 1818)."

full committee of the different issues inpeace-loving nation, dedicated to the

volved, House Concurrent Resolution 129 Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I high principles and objectives of the was unanimously approved and introduced offer a motion,

U. N., the Communist regime in China as a committee resolution by the Honorable ROBERT B. CHIPERFIELD, chairman of the com- mental freedoms for all without distinction mittee. Thus the resolution is a carefully as to race, sex, language, or religion; and thought out expression of congressional in- - "To be a center for harmonizing the actention.

tions of nations in the attainment of these In response to the chairman's request for common ends." an expression of its views, the Department Article 2 imposes rules of conduct upon of State advised him that “the aim of this the members: resolution accords with the views expressed “The organization is based on the princiby the President."

ple of the sovereign equality of all its memChina has been a member of the United

bers. Nations since the beginning of that organi- "All members, in order to insure to all of zation. Its seat has always been, and is,

them the rights and benefits resulting from occupied by a representative of the National

membership, shall fulfill in good faith the Government of the Republic of China, now

obligations assumed by them in accordance on Formosa. The issue is whether the single

with the present charter. seat assigned to China-one of the five per

"All members shall settle their internamanent members of the Security Council

tional disputes by peaceful means in such should continue to be held by the representa

à manner that international peace and secutive of the National Government of the Re

rity and justice are not endangered. public of China or whether that representative should be unseated and a representative

"All members shall refrain in their inter

national relations from the threat or use of of the Chinese Communists who have seized

force against the territorial integrity or politthe mainland given that seat. The attitude

ical independence of any state, or in any of Congress is an unequivocal expression of opposition to the latter alternative.

other manner inconsistent with the purposes

of the United Nations. The legal issues involved in determining whether the Chinese Communists should be

"All members shall give the United Naseated in place of the representative from

tions every assistance in any action it takes Nationalist China have been exhaustively

in accordance with the present Charter, and debated in the organs of the United Nations. shall refrain from giving assistance to any In its resolution of December 14, 1950, the state against which the United Nations is General Assembly recommended that in taking preventive or enforcement action.” cases where "more than one authority claims Measured against the criteria laid down in to be the government entitled to represent

the charter, the Chinese Communists do not a member state * * * the question should meet the standards prescribed for memberbe considered in the light of the purposes ship in the United Nations. They have and principles of the charter and the circum- shown a consistent disregard for fundastances of each case.”

mental human rights, they have degraded An examination of those portions of the the dignity of persons, and they have charter strengthens the committee's convic- obliterated the rights of individuals. Freetion that the Chinese Communists have no dom has been stifled; intolerance has been basis upon which to lay claim to representa- substituted for tolerance. tion in the United Nations. The preamble In the international field the Chinese of the charter states the spirit that moti- Communists have not only refused to assist vated the establishment of that organization, the United Nations in its action taken in namely:

accordance with the charter against aggres“To reaffirm faith in fundamental human sion in Korea; they have participated in the rights, in the dignity and worth of the hu- aggression. This is not alone the judgment man person, in the equal rights of men and of the United States. It is the considered women and of nations large and small; and conclusion reached by an overwhelming

"To establish conditions under which jus- majority of the General Assembly. A retice and respect for the obligations arising gime that has been held to have violated from treaties and other sources of interna- the charter cannot plead that it meets the tional law can be maintained; and

standards necessary to hold a seat in an "To promote social progress and better organization pledged to support that very standards of life in larger freedom; and for charter. Indeed, to seat the Chinese Comthese ends to practice tolerance and live munists would only qualify them for expultogether in peace with one another as good' sion. Article 6 states that "a member of neighbors; and

the United Nations which has persistently “To unite our strength to maintain inter- violated the principles contained in the presnational peace and security; and

ent charter may be expelled from the or"To insure, by the acceptance of principles ganization ***.”

To accord representaand the institution of methods, that armed tion to a regime that is unable or unwilling force shall not be used, save in the common to discharge its international responsibilities interests; and

would make a mockery of the very principles “To employ international machinery for that led to the creation of the United Nathe promotion of the economic and social tions. It would violate both the letter and advancement of all peoples; have resolved to the spirit of the charter. combine our efforts to accomplish these The moral and legal issues involved in this aims."

question are not in conflict with the pracArticle 1 spells out the purposes for which tical issues. The United States and the the United Nations has been organized- United Nations are engaged in hostilities

“To maintain international peace and against the Chinese Communists. To give security, and to that end, to take effective them a permanent seat on the Security Councollective measures for the prevention and cil, equal in weight of that of the United removal of threats to the peace, and for the States and the other permanent members, suppression of acts of aggression or other would enhance their prestige, give courage breaches of the peace, and to bring about to their sympathizers, and weaken those by peaceful means, and in conformity with

who are resisting Communist aggression the principles of justice and international

from without and Communist subjugation law, adjustment or settlement of interna- from within. It would imply an acceptance tional disputes or situations which might of their permanent conquest of China and lead to a breach of the peace;

give them an air of respectability. All of “To develop friendly relations among na- this is in contradiction of the judgment tions based on respect for the principle of already expressed by the members. equal rights and self-determination of peo- The psychological consequences of seating ples, and to take other apppropriate meas- the Chinese Communists would be disasures to strengthen universal peace;

trous. It would be a reward to the enemies "To achieve international cooperation in of the United Nations and of the United solving international problems of an eco- States. The prestige of the organization nomic, social, cultural, or humanitarian would suffer irreparably no less than that of character, and in promoting and encouraging the members who are fighting to uphold its respect for human rights and for funda- principles,

In the course of the present truce negotiations, our Government has taken an adamant position that it will not turn over to the Chinese Communists some 15,000 Chinese prisoners who are opposed to the Communist regime. The committee believes that the American people will not accept for 450 million people what it rejects for 15,000.

For these reasons our Government should actively oppose granting representation to the Chinese Communists in the United Nations or in any of the specialized agencies. Should the Chinese Communist delegate, nevertheless, be seated over our opposition, the Congress, representing the overwhelming sentiment of the American people on this matter, would properly insist upon a reexamination of our participation in the United Nations or any of the specialized agencies.

The SPEAKER. The question is on the motion of the gentleman from Ohio [Mr. CLEVENGER).

Mr. TABER. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered.

The question was taken; and there were-yeas 379, nays 0, not voting 52, as follows:

[Roll No. 95]

YEAS-379
Abbitt
Carrigg

Gary
Abernethy Cederberg Gathings
Adair
Celler

Gavin
Addonizio Chelf

Gentry
Albert

Chenoweth George Alexander Chudoff

Golden Allen, Calif. Church

Goodwin Allen, Ill. Clardy

Gordon Andersen, Clevenger Graham H. Carl

Cole, Mo. Granahan
Andresen, Cole, N. Y. Grant
August H. Colmer

Gregory
Andrews
Condon

Gross
Angell
Cooley

Gubser
Arends
Coon

Gwinn
Ashmore Cooper

Hagen, Calif.
Aspinall Corbett Hagen, Minn.
Auchincloss Cotton

Hale
Ayres
Coudert

Haley
Bailey
Cretella

Halleck
Barden
Crosser

Hand
Bates

Crumpacker Harden
Beamer

Cunningham Hardy
Becker

Curtis, Mass. Harris
Belcher

Curtis, Mo. Harrison, Nebr.
Bender

Curtis, Nébr. Harrison, Va.
Bennett, Fla. Dague

Harrison, Wyo.
Bennett, Mich. Davis, Ga.. Hart
Bentley

Davis, Tenn. Harvey
Bentsen
Davis, Wis.

Hays, Ark.
Betts

Dawson, Utah Hays, Ohio
Bishop
Deane

Herlong
Boggs

Dempsey Heselton
Boland

Derounian Hess
Bolling

Devereux Hiestand
Bolton,
D’Ewart

Hill
Frances P. Dodd

Hillelson
Bolton,

Dollinger Hillings Oliver P. Dondero Hoeven Bonin

Donovan Hoffman, Ill.
Bonner

Dorn, N. Y. Holmes
Bosch
Dorn, S. C.

Holt
Bow
Dowdy

Holtzman
Bowler
Doyle

Horan
Boykin

Durham Hosmer
Bramblett Eberharter Howell
Bray

Edmondson Hruska
Brooks, La. Ellsworth Hunter
Brooks, Tex. Engle

Hyde
Brown, Ga. Evins

Ikard
Brownson Fallon

Jackson
Broyhill Feighan James
Buchanan Fenton

Jarman
Budge

Fernandez Javits
Burdick
Fine

Jenkins
Burleson Fino

Jensen
Busbey
Fisher

Jonas, Ill.
Bush
Forand

Jonas, N. C.
Byrd
Ford

Jones, Ala.
Byrne, Pa.

Forrester Jones, Mo.
Byrnes, Wis. Fountain Jones, N.C.
Camp
Frazier

Judd
Campbell Frelinghuysen Karsten, Mo.
Canfield Friedel

Kean
Cannon
Fulton

Kearney
Carlyle
Gamble

Kearns
Carnahan Garmatz Keating

Kee
Nicholson Short

Mr. Rhodes of Arizona with Mr. Donohue. to the Congress on the 1st of July and JanuKelley, Pa. Norblad Shuford

Mr. Case with Mr. Chatham.

ary showing the names of the persons emKelly, N. Y Norrell

Sieminski
Keogh
O'Brien, Ill. Sikes

Mr. Hoffman of Michigan with Mr. Morri- ployed under the foregoing limitation, the

son. Kersten, Wis. O'Brien, Mich. Simpson, Ill.

annual rate of compensation or amount of Kilburn O'Brien, N.Y. Simpson, Pa. Mr. Hinshaw with Mr. Battle.

any fee paid to each, together with a deKing, Calif. O'Hara, Ill. Small

Mr. Springer with Mr. Blatnik.

scription of their duties." King, Pa. O'Konski Smith, Kans. Mr. Johnson with Mr. Holifield.

The motion was agreed to.
Kirwan
Osmers
Smith, Miss.

Mr. Riehlman with Mr. Kilday.
Klein
Ostertag Smith, Va.

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will re- Mr. Robsion of Kentucky with Mr. Elliott. Kluczynski Passman Smith, Wis.

port the next amendment in disagree-
Knox
Patman
Spence

The result of the vote was announced ment.
Krueger
Patten
Staggers

as above recorded.
Laird
Patterson Stauffer

The Clerk read as follows:
Landrum Pelly

Steed
Mr. JUDD. Mr. Speaker, the Com-

Senate amendment No. 24: Page 25, line 23,
Lane
Perkins

Stringfellow mittee on Foreign Affairs unanimously
Lanham
Pfost
Sullivan

insert:
reported on July 10 a resolution sub-
Lantaff
Phillips
Sutton

“Sec. 208. Not to exceed 10 percent of the Latham Pilcher Taber stantially the same as that which we

appropriations for legal activities and genLeCompte Poage

Talle

have just adopted in agreeing to the eral administration in this title shall be Lesinski Poff

Taylor

motion to recede and concur in the Sen- available interchangeably, with the approval Long Polk Teague

of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, Lovre Preston

ate amendment. I ask unanimous con

Thomas
Lyle
Price

Thompson, La. sent that the committee report on House but no appropriation shall be increased by
McConnell Priest
Thompson, Concurrent Resolution No. 129 be printed of appropriations hereunder shall be reported

more than 10 percent and any interchange McCormack Prouty

Mich.

in the RECORD just prior to the rollcall McCulloch Rabaut Thompson, Tex.

to the Congress in the annual budget." McDonough Radwan Thornberry

vote. McGregor Rains

Tollefson

The SPEAKER. Is there objection Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I McIntire Ray Trimble

to the request of the gentleman from offer a motion. McMillan Rayburn Tuck

Reams
Machrowicz

Utt
Minnesota?

The Clerk read as follows:
Mack, Ill. Reece, Tenn. Van Pelt

There was no objection.

Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House reMack, Wash. Reed, N. Y. Van Zandt

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report cede from its disagreement to the amendMadden Rees, Kans. Velde

the next amendment in disagreement. ment of the Senate numbered 24, and conMagnuson Regan

Vinson
Mahon
Rhodes, Pa. Vorys
The Clerk read as follows:

cur therein with an amendment, as follows: Mailliard Richards Walter

Senate amendment No. 23: Page 23, line

Wherever the figure “10” appears in said Marshall Riley Wampler

amendment insert in lieu thereof the figure Rivers Martin, Iowa

18, strike out all of section 202 and insert

Warburton
Matthews

"5."
Roberts
Watts

the following:
Meader
Robeson, Va. Weichel
"SEC. 202. Not to exceed $1 million in the

The motion was agreed to.
Merrill
Rodino
Westland
aggregate from the appropriations made in

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will re-
Merrow
Rogers, Colo. Wharton

this title for general administration, general Metcalf Rogers, Fla. Wheeler

legal activities and United States attorneys port the next amendment in disagreeMiller, Calif. Rogers, Mass. Whitten

and marshals shall be available for com- ment. Miller, Kans. Rogers, Tex. Wickhersham

Rooney Miller, Md.

Widnali

pensation of United States attorneys, assist- The Clerk read as follows: Miller, Nebr. Sadlak

Williams, Miss.

ant United States attorneys, special attorMiller, N. Y.

Senate amendment No. 26: Page 26, line St. George Williams, N. Y. neys and special assistants to the Attorney Mills Saylor

Wilson, Calif. General and to United States attorneys 13, insert“; and in addition, in order to Mollohan Scherer Wilson, Ind. without regard to the Classification Act of

provide for additional organization and Morano Scott Wilson, Tex. 1949 as amended: Provided, That in no event

management surveys of the Department of Morgan Scrivner Winstead shall the annual salary of any United States

Commerce, the Secretary may transfer not Moss Scudder Withrow

to exceed $100,000 to this appropriation Moulder Secrest Wolcott

attorney be less than $10,000 or more than Multer

from any other appropriations available to Seely-Brown Wolverton

$15,000 and in no event shall the annual
Mumma
Selden
Yates

salary of any assistant United States attor- the Department of Commerce for salaries Murray Shafer Young ney or any special attorney or special assist

and expenses for the current fiscal year and Neal Sheehan Younger ant be less than $6,000 or more than $12,000:

in addition not to exceed $450,000 of the Nelson Shelley Zablocki Provided further, That the maximum of

unobligated balances of all annual approNAYS—0 $12,000 shall only apply to the Chief Assistant

priations available to the Department of NOT VOTING—52 United States Attorney in each office.”

Commerce during fiscal year 1953 to be used

to cover the costs of reduction-in-force of Baker Green Pillion

Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I officers and employees whose services are Barrett Hébert Powell

move that the House recede and concur terminated, which amount may be allotted Battle Heller

Reed, Ill. Berry

by the Secretary, to be used exclusively Hinshaw Rhodes, Ariz. in the Senate amendment with an Blatnik Hoffman, Mich. Riehlman amendment.

for terminal leave expenses of the offices and Brown, Ohio Holifield Robsion, Ky.

The Clerk read as follows:

bureaus concerned.”
Buckley
Hope

Roosevelt
Case
Johnson Schenck

Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House re- Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I ofChatham Kilday

Sheppard

cedé from its disagreement to the amend- fer a motion. Chiperfield Lucas

Springer

ment of the Senate numbered 23, and con- The Clerk read as follows:
Dawson, Ill. McCarthy Vursell
Delaney

cur therein with an amendment, as follows:
McVey
Wainwright
In lieu of the matter stricken out and in-

Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House re.
Dies
Mason
Wier

cede from its disagreement to the amendDingell Morrison Wigglesworth

serted by said amendment insert the folDolliver

ment of the Senate numbered 26, and conOakman Willis

lowing: Donohue O'Hara, Minn. Yorty

"SEC. 202. Not to exceed $1 million in the cur therein with an amendment, as follows: Elliott O'Neill aggregate from the appropriations made in

In lieu of the figure “$450,000" named in said Fogarty Philbin

this title for general administration, gen- amendment insert "$400,000." So the motion was agreed to. eral legal activities and United States at

The motion was agreed to. The Clerk announced the following torneys and marshals shall be available for increases in the compensation of United

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report pairs:

States attorneys, assistant United States at- the next amendment in disagreement. Mr. Wigglesworth with Mr. Hébert.

torneys, special attorneys, and special assist- The Clerk read as follows:
Mr. Brown of Ohio with Mr. Roosevelt. ants to the Attorney General and to United
Mr. McVey with Mr. O'Neill.
States attorneys without regard to the Classi-

Senate amendment No. 28: Page 27, line Mr. Mason with Mr. Yorty. fication Act of 1949 as amended: Provided,

16, insert: Mr: Hope with Mr. McCarthy.

That in no event shall the annual salary of "Censuses of business and manufactures: Mr. Chiperfield with Mr. Barrett.

any United States attorney be less than For expenses necessary for taking, compiling, Mr. Dolliver with Mr. Green.

$10,000 or more than $15,000 and in no event and publishing the censuses of business and Mr. O'Hara of Minnesota with Mr. Fogarty. shall the annual salary of any assistant manufactures as authorized by law, includMr. Reed of Illinois with Mr. Dies.

United States attorney or any special at- ing personal services by contract or otherMr. Schenck with Mr. Dingell.

torney or special assistant be less than $6,000, wise at rates to be fixed by the Secretary of Mr. Wainwright with Mr. Delaney.

if the official has been admitted to the prac- Commerce without regard to the ClassificaMr. Vursell with Mr. Buckley.

tice of law for 3 years, or more than $12,000: tion Act of 1949 as amended; and additional Mr. Baker with Mr. Heller.

Provided further, that the maximum of compensation of Federal employees tempoMr. Berry with Mr. Powell.

$12,000 shall only apply to the chief assist- rarily detailed for fieldwork under this apMr. Oakman with Mr. Sheppard.

ant United States attorney in each office: propriation; $9,400,000, to remain available Mr. Pillion with Mr. Philbin.

Provided further, That reports be submitted untu December 31, 1956." XCIX-591

Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I of which $1,500,000 not to exceed $250,000 Mr. POLK. I rise at this time to supoffer a motion.

may be transferred to the appropriation port the gentleman's motion, and to state The Clerk read as follows: "Salaries and expenses, Civil Aeronautics Ad

that in the Sixth Congressional District ministration,” to provide for necessary adMr. CLEVENGER moves that the House reministrative expenses, including the mainte

of Ohio, in Scioto County, and in the cede from its disagreement to the amend- nance and operation of aircraft: Provided, city of Portsmouth, there is now lying ment of the Senate numbered 28, and conThat the appropriation under this head for

in the bank $400,000 which is the result cur therein with an amendment, as follows: the next preceding fiscal year is hereby of a bond issue voted in that county a In lieu of the matter proposed by said merged with this appropriation and the con- few months ago. This money is for an amendment insert:

tract authorization heretofore granted for airport that should be built near the new “Censuses of business and manufacturers the foregoing purposes may hereafter be ac

atomic-energy plant in Scioto and Pike and agriculture: For expenses for 'spot counted for under this head." checking' business, manufactures, and agri

Counties. It is necessary that there be culture in such manner as the Secretary of

Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I a suitable airport in the vicinity of this Commerce shall decide to be most helpful offer a motion.

great national-defense project. I cerand informative to said undertakings in- The Clerk read as follows:

tainly hope that the House will agree cluding personal services by contract or

Mr. CLEVENGER moves that the House insist to the approval of this $12,500,000 which otherwise at rates to be fixed by said Secre

on its disagreement to the amendment of was included in the Senate. I want to tary without regard to the Classification Act the Senate numbered 34.

strongly urge support of the motion of of 1949, as amended; and additional compen

the gentleman from Georgia. sation of Federal employees temporarily de- Mr. PRESTON. Mr. Speaker, I rise to tailed for fieldwork under this appropria- offer a preferential motion. I move that

Mr. PRESTON. I thank the gentletion; $1,500,000." the House recede from its disagreement

man. I would like to point out further

that the only way we can view this airMr. ROONEY. Mr. Speaker, will the to Senate amendment No. 34 and con

port program is in the same light in gentleman yield?

cur therein.
The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report We spend $500 million

annually in makMr. CLEVENGER. I yield.

which we view the public-roads program. Mr. ROONEY. Mr. Speaker, this is the motion.

ing contributions to the States for the one of the many amendments in dis

The Clerk read as follows:

purpose of building roads. Here we ask agreement between this body and the Mr. PRESTON moves that the House recede

for the puny sum of $12.5 million comother body on which the present speakfrom its disagreement to Senate amendment

pared to $500 million for roads, and the er, the gentleman from New York, has No. 34 and concur therein.

House conferees have said, "No, we will not and does not now agree with the Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I not go along with the Senate on that majority. The other body inserted pro- yield 5 minutes to the gentleman from proposition.” visions in this bill for the censuses of Georgia [Mr. PRESTON).

Now, there is a matter of good faith business and manufacturers and mineral Mr. PRESTON. Mr. Speaker, this pro- involved in this question. I do not think industries in the amount of $9,400,000, gram was authorized by the Congress in we can afford to cut off this Federal aid and to the amount of $2,200,000 for a 1946, and it has worked so effectively, to airports until we have served notice census of agriculture. The conference especially in the areas of the large cities on the cities that the funds will not be committee has seen fit to compromise of America. It must be noted in con- available any longer. They had every this by allowing for all merely the sum sidering this item that an airport is an right to issue bonds in good faith, believof $1,500,000. I have previously pointed interstate operation. Without the as- ing that the program would continue. out to the House the importance of these sistance of the Federal Government to No notice had been served upon the cities censuses, and I feel the action of the improve and establish airports in the that it would not continue. So we have conferees in agreeing to the amount of metropolitan areas of our country, the gotten the cities into a very awkward $1,500,000 for—what? For something cities themselves would be financially position by virtue of the House action in new in the manner of taking censuses unable to provide the type of facilities not allowing any funds for this Federal and authorizing censuses—we have the and safety devices necessary to make aid to airports program. interesting language, “Censuses of busi- air travel safe.

It is understandable that it is necesness and manufactures and agricul- This program has worked very well, sary in the time of financial stress to ture-for expenses for spot checking indeed, and many of our cities have voted eliminate some of our programs which business, manufacturers, and agricul- bonds for the purpose of carrying on are most desirable, but not perhaps absoture.”

That is an entirely new depar- expansions and adding various safety de- lutely necessary, but in so doing we ture and one with which the gentleman vices to the airports. Such cities as Co- should not do it without giving the cities from New York has not agreed.

lumbus, Ohio, for instance, have issued adequate warning in order to prevent Mr. CLEVENGER. Mr. Speaker, I bonds in the sum of $300,000 for the spe- their getting into this awkward position move the previous question on the mo- cific purpose of improving airports and in which approximately 27 of our major tion.

for the specific purpose of having Fed- cities find themselves today. The previous question was ordered. eral funds matched dollar for dollar.

Mr. VORYS. Mr. Speaker, will the The SPEAKER. The question is on [r. VORYS. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield? the motion of the gentleman from Ohio gentleman yield?

Mr. PRESTON. I yield. [Mr. CLEVENGER).

Mr. PRESTON. I yield to the gentle- Mr. VORYS. Is it not a fact that at The motion was agreed to. man from Ohio.

Port Columbus the defense activities surThe SPEAKER. The Clerk will re- Mr. VORYS. That was $31/2 million rounding it account for about one-third port the next amendment in disagreein Columbus.

of all the landings on that airport? It ment.

Mr. PRESTON. Yes. I would like to has a high defense priority. If the FedThe Clerk read as follows:

correct my statement. Lansing, Mich.; eral Government can get a defense air

issued $300,000 of bonds, and Columbus, port for 50 cents on the dollar by simply Senate amendment No. 34: Page 31, line 6, strike out all of line 6 down to and including Ohio, has voted $342 million of bonds, matching funds which have already been line 16 and insert:

upon which they are paying interest. provided by a city's bond issue, they "Federal-aid airport program, Federal Air

They are not allowed to spend those should do so. It is economy. port Act: For carrying out the provisions of

funds for any other purpose except for Mr. PRESTON. I am sure the gentlethe Federal Airport Act of May 13, 1946, as airport development. San Francisco, man is correct in his statement. amended (except sec. 5 (a)), to be avail. Calif., has voted $3 million in bonds. Mr. EVINS. Mr. Speaker, will the able until June 30, 1958, $12,500,000, of which Likewise, they are paying interest on gentleman yield? (1) $10 million shall be for projects in the those bonds and the money is lying idle Mr. PRESTON. I yield. States in accordance with section 6 of said

in the bank waiting for the Federal Govact, (2) $400,000 for projects in Puerto Rico,

Mr. EVINS. In a number of cities ernment to continue this program which funds have been raised and bond issues (3) $25,000 for projects in the Virgin Islands, (4) $400,000 for projects in the Territory of

was inaugurated in 1946 and which has floated. It seems to me it certainly is Hawaii, (5) $175,000 for projects in the Ter

been carried forward each year until this a violation of an implied contract on the ritory of Alaska, and (6) $1,500,000 shall be year.

part of the Federal Government not to available as one fund for necessary planning, Mr. POLK. Mr. Speaker, will the gen- provide funds in these situations for the research, and administrative expenses; intleman yield?

development of the airport program. cluding purchase (not to exceed 10 for re- Mr. PRESTON. I yield to the gentle- Mr. PRESTON. I thank the gentleplacement only) of passenger motor vehicles; man from Ohio.

man for his statement.

« PreviousContinue »