Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

CONTAINING RULES AND EXERCISES ON THE MODE OF ENUNCH-

ATION REQUIRED FOR PUBLIC READING AND SPEAKING,

BY WILLIAM RUSSELL,

ED. JOURNAL OF EDUCATION, (FIRST SERIES.)

BOSTON:
JENKS, PALMER & CO.

1848.

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT:

District Clerk's Office. BE it remembered, that on the second day of Nov. A. D. 1830, in the fifty-fifth year o ine Independence of the United States of America, William Russell, of the said District, has deposited in this Oifice the Title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as Author, in the words following, to wit:

Lessons in Enunciation ; comprising a Course of Elementary Exercises, and a Statement of Common Errors in Articulation, with the Rules of correct Usage in Pronouncing. To which is added an Appendix, containing Rules and Exercises on the Mode of Enun. ciation required for public Reading and Speaking. By William Russeil. Ed. Journal of Education, (First Series.)

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the airthors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ;' and also to an act, entitled, “ An Act supplementary to an act, entitled, An Act for the encourage, ment of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ; and extending the benefits ibereot' to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.”

JNO. W. DAVIS,
Clerk of the District of Massachusetts.

PREFACE.

No branch of elementary education is so generally neglected as that of reading. It is not necessary, in proof of this assertion, to appeal to the prevailing want of appropriate elocution at the bar or in the pulpit. The worst defects in reading and speaking are by no means confined to professional life, and occasions which call for eloquent address: they extend through all classes of society, and are strikingly apparent in the public exercises of colleges, the daily lessons of schools, in private reading, and in common conversation. The faults now alluded to, are all owing to the want of a distinct and correct enunciation, which, whatever may become of higher accomplishments, would seem to be alike indispensable to a proper cultivation of the human faculties, and to the useful purposes of life.

It is unnecessary here to enlarge on the intellectual injuries arising to the young, from the want of early discipline in this department of education ; or to speak of the habits of inattention and inaccuracy, which are thus cherished ; or of the degradation of the English language from its native force and dignity of utterance to a low and slovenly negligence of style, by which it is rendered unfit for the best offices of speech.

The following pages are respectfully submitted to parents and teachers, as a means of remedying such evils, and of devoting a seasonable attention to the formation of correct habits of enunciation, in the elementary instruction of children. It is hoped, also, that the work may be found serviceable to pupils in whose early lessons in reading the subjects of articulation and pronunciation may have been passed over too slightly.

The appendix is designed for the use of students still more advanced, who may be disposed to devote their attention to the elements of elocution, with a view to professional purposes,

« PreviousContinue »