Readings in American Indian Law: Recalling the Rhythm of Survival

Front Cover
Jo Carrillo
Temple University Press, 1998 - History - 353 pages
This collection of works many by Native American scholars introduces selected topics in federal Indian law. Readings in American Indian Law covers contemporary issues of identity and tribal recognition; reparations for historic harms; the valuation of land in land claims; the return to tribal owners of human remains, sacred items, and cultural property; tribal governance and issues of gender, democracy informed by cultural awareness, and religious freedom.
Courses in federal Indian law are often aimed at understanding rules, not cultural conflicts. This book expands doctrinal discussions into understandings of culture, strategy, history, identity, and hopes for the future. Contributions from law, history, anthropology, ethnohistory, biography, sociology, socio-legal studies, and fiction offer an array of alternative paradigms as strong antidotes to our usual conceptions of federal Indian law.
Each selection reveals an aspect of how federal Indian law is made, interpreted, implemented, or experienced. Throughout, the book centers on the ever present and contentious issue of identity. At the point where identity and law intersect lies an important new way to contextualize the legal concerns of Native Americans. Author note: Jo Carrillo is Visiting Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, where she is on leave from the University of California, Hastings College of Law.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (1998)

Jo Carrillo is visiting Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, where she is on leave from the University of California, Hastings College of Law.

Bibliographic information