Page images
PDF
EPUB

men to enter college in the sophomore year, and embraces an amount of Latin and Greek equal to that usually read in the freshman year. The scientific course is intended to equal that usually parsued in scientific institutions, and occupies four years. Teachers of French and German and phonography are provided. The institution has, by its charter, all the privileges and powers of a college, but does not design to confer any degrees except B. S. The graduates of its classical course receive a certificate of their standing and attainments.

I regret that the materials are not at hand for a more extended account of this time-honored and eminently useful and worthy institution.

STATISTICAL SUMMARY.

Years occupied in regular course of study.

4 Number of pupils pursuing a full course...

40 Number of pupils pursuing a partial course

60 Number of pupils giaduating during the year

3 Whole number of graduates since organization of institution, about..

400 Number of professors and instructors .. Value of buildings, furniture and grounds ..

.830,000 Number of volumos in libraries.

1,200 Value of libraries....

$1,000 Value of apparatus...

800 Charge per annum for tuition in regular course.

88 Room and necessary incidental experses, per annum...

16 Average of total annual expenses, per student. ...,

200 Date of annual commencement.

Fourth Thursday in June.

WAUKEGAN ACADEMY.

(Waukegan, Lake County. Founded 1848.)

Migs A. A. STEWART, Principal.

Messrs. Henry L. Hatch and Isaac L. Clark, opened this school as associate principals, and managed it for two years; since then it has been in various hands, with varying fortunes. It prescribes no conrse with a view to graduation, and is not endowed, depending apon its popularity and good management for pecuniary success. Its principal says:

“Up to the year 1854, the school was anusually prosperous, numbering at times three hundred pupils, engaging from six to seven instructors. Since that time it has maintained a good repu

tation, but owing to the many similar institutions near us, and the great improvement in our common schools throughout this and neighboring counties, it has not been so prosperous as regards numbers since 1854; the average attendance has been about seventy. There are at present three teachers engaged."

[blocks in formation]

“Clark Seminary offers both sexes good advantages in the various English branches, languages, music and ornamentals. It has superior stone buildings, and fifteen experienced teachers.” The main building is 125 feet long by 40 feet wide, and five stories high; the rear building is 70 feet long by 45 feet wide, and four stories high. They are built of stone, and are fire-proof. There are three "graduating courses---a classicaal, scientific, and a commercial, together with preparatory, normal and musical departments. The classical occupies four years; and in Latin includes Virgil, and in Greek the Anabasis and the Greek testament. The commercial course includes telegraphing and phonography. The norinal class sends forth annually from forty to sixty teachers of the public schools. The average attendance of pupils per year, for eight years, has been 309, from ten to twelve states being represented.

“Clark Seminary owes its existence to the ideas and persistent efforts of Rev. John Clark, a Methodist clergyman, of Rock River Conference, but it was not till after his death that his great design was accomplished. After a long and severe conflict (such as is not unusual in the early history of academic and literary institutions), between insufficient subscriptions and a burden of debt, the seminary passed into the hands of the Rock River Conference by its purchasing it of the creditors, on their proposal, for the sum of $25,000, about one-third of its cost. Although the seminary was so long perpetually embarrassed in its general finances, these embarrassments did not very materially interfere with the progress and prosperity of the school.”

STATISTICAL SUMMARY.

Years occupied in regular course of study.
Number of pupils pursuing a full course.

54 Number of pupils pursuing a partial course...

177 Number of pupils in preparatory department...

93 Number of pupils graduating during the year...

12 Whole number of graduates since organization of institution..

103 Number of professors and instructors...

13 Value of buildings, furniture and grounds..

$80,000 Value of libraries .....

357 Value of apparatus and eabinet...

$1,500 Charge per annum for tuition in regular course. Average of total annual expenses, per student.

200 Date of annual commencement.

Third Tuesday in June.

36

HEDDING SEMINARY AND CENTRAL ILLINOIS FEMALE COLLEGE.

[Abingdon, Knox County.

Founded 1855.]

D. T. Wilson, Secretary of Faculty.

This institution is under the patronage and general direction of the “Central Illinois Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Charch." Males and females are admitted. There are two courses of study for each: for young ladies the scientific and commercial, for young gentlemen the scientific and classical. Normal, musical and ornamental departments are added.

The secretary writes : “When young gentlemen complete either of these courses, they are prepared to complete the course usually prescribed in American colleges in three years. During the past year there have been added to the facilities of the institution a full set of chemical apparatus, and several astronomical and philosophical instruments; also a complete set of Illinois rocks from the State Cabinet."

STATISTICAL SUMMARY.,

48 .200

Years occupied in regular course of study.
Number of pupils pursuing a full course....
Number of pupils in preparatory department .
Number of pupils graduating during the year
Whole number of graduates since organization of institution.
Number of professors and instructors...
Value of buildings, furniture and grounds....
Amount of endowment, exclusive of buildings, etc.
Number of volumes in libraries.....

7. $21,000 15,000

600

Value of libraries.....
Value of apparatus .
Charge per annom for tuition in regular course...
Room and necessary incidental expenses, per annum.
Average of total annual expenses, per student..
Date of annual commencement.

$1,200

400 18 to 24

160

175 . Third Tuesday in June.

MT, ZION MALE AND FEMALE SEMINARY.

(Mount Zion, Macon County.

Founded 1855.)

A. J. WALLACE, B.S., M.D., Principal. The huilding for this school was erected by an association of the citizens of Mount Zion, Macon county, in 1853. The original building was destroyed by fire about a yer after. A second building of brick was immediately erected by the stockholders. In 1864 the stockholders transferred the institution to the Decatur Presbytery of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, under whose auspices it was regularly chartered by the State Legislature. An endowment of $10,000 on the scholarship plan was raised, but afterward abandoned, and the scholarships withdrawn. A donation endowment of $3,000 has since been received. The yearly average of students entered has been 150. The seminary has a library of 200 volumes.

MENDOTA WESLEYAN SEMINARY.

(Mendota, LaSalle Courty. Fonnded 1856.)

Rev. S. N. GRIFFITU, A. M., Principal till August 11, 1868. The sketch furnished sets forth the “history and organization, the workings and termination," of this seminary; but as there is probability that it will be continued under some other patronage, the principal facts are here given. This institution was projected by the Rev. J. S. Henderson, who took charge of the Presbyterian Church of Mendota in the antumn of 1855. A building was erected on land donated by T. B. Blackburn, Esq., being completed in 1858. Mr. Henderson died in 1861, and Rev. Robert C. Colmery succeeded to the pastorate of the Presbyterian church and the charge of the school. With the exception of a short period while the building was refitting, the seminary continued under the charge of Mr. Colmery until the fall of 1867, he having

purchased the property meanwhile. Up to this time the attendance had averaged 100 students per term. In the fall of 1867 i he the property was sold to Rev. F. A. Harding, of the Methodist Episcopal church of Mendota, who designed to have the institution incorporated and brought under the patronage of that church. Trustees were elected under the general law; and the building was rented to Mr. Griffith, who aimed to make the seminary a connecting link between the district school and the higher institutions of learning in the State. The enterprise had been undertaken with the expectation that there would be a Jivision of the Rock River Conference, and that the institution could be put under the patronage of the new conference. As the division was not made, the originators of the enterprise decided to dispose of the property at the tirst opportunity; and the principal resigned. Negotiations between them and some other denominations are now pending.

The building will accommodate some thirty to forty boarders, and the chapel and recitation rooms are sufficient for 150 pupils.

STATISTICAL SUMMARY.

[ocr errors]

Years occupied in regular course of study...
Number of pupils pursuing a full course

1 Number of pupi s pursu ng a p rtial course.

14 Number of pup Is in preparatory department .

77 Whole number of graduates since organization of institution..

25 Number of p ofessors and instructors.

6 Value of buildings, furniture und grounds..

. $15,000 Number of volumes in libraries

178 Value of libraries.

$350 Value of apparatus.....

20 Charge per annum for tuition in regular course...

30 Room and necessary incidental expenses, per annum..

163 Average of total annual expenses, per student.

180 Date of annual commcucement.

.Fourth Wednesday in June.

BLACKBURN SEMINARY.

(Carlinville, Macoupin County. Founded 1857.]

Rev. John W. BAILEY, A. M., Theological Professor. Dr. Gideon Blackburn, who had a remarkably far-reaching and comprehensive mind, in 1835-6 conceived and carried into operation a plan by which he was enabled (in 1837) to deed to trustees

Vol. II-91

« PreviousContinue »