Page images
PDF
EPUB

reported by 33. The 35 canneries gave employment to 4,898 wageearners—2,092 males and 2,806 females. The selling value of the product amounted to $1,703,389.

THE POTTERY INDUSTRY.-A canvass of the potteries in the city of Trenton was made by the Bureau of Labor in 1904 for the purpose of gaining, as nearly as possible, an exact knowledge of the health conditions prevalent in the industry. Returns were received from 33 potteries, which employed at the time of making the canvass an aggregate of 3,751 work people, about 675 of whom were females. The results of the inquiry showed that the conditions peculiar to the industry, which produced diseases in former years, had, to a fairly large extent, passed away as a result of improved factory buildings and the adoption in many old potteries of the latest methods of sanitation and ventilation; yet much remains to be done if the trade is made absolutely healthful. Physicians whose practice lies largely among potteries and who were consulted on the subject of diseases peculiar to the potter's trade stated that there has been a pronounced decline during recent years in potter's tuberculosis, asthma, lead colic, and other forms of illness. With regard to accidents in the potteries where all modern safeguards have been adopted, the only dangerous work now is said to be about the kilns, and the risks connected with them are slight. Dust, once a prolific cause of asthma and consumption, has, to a large extent, ceased to be so, all sweeping and cleaning up being done at night. During recent years the social condition of the potters has steadily improved.

THE GLASS INDUSTRY.-This is a review of the changes in wages and in methods of production in the glass industry of the State from 1875 to 1905. The information was obtained from men who had followed the trade as blowers during the thirty-year period, or for an even greater length of time, and who were thoroughly familiar with every new feature introduced into the process of manufacture during that time, and also from the records of the largest and oldest glass-making plants. But the main purpose of the inquiry was to ascertain the trend of glass blowers' wages during the period of time under review, improvements in process of manufacture being noticed only in so far as they may have affected the question of wages. It was found impossible to obtain wage data for each year of the period separately, but average earnings covering various periods were determined with approximate correctness. Up to 1879 the average earnings of blowers appears to have been $3.83 per day; from 1879 to 1890 the average was about $4.83 per day; from 1890 to 1905 the. average has been about $5 per day.

THE EIGHT-HOUR MOVEMENT.—This part cf the report reviews the investigation made by the Federal Government, during the Fifty-eighth Congress, concerning the relation of the shorter workday to cost of production, preparatory to the consideration of House bill, No. 4064, “limiting the hours of daily service of laborers and mechanics employed upon work done for the United States, or for any Territory, or for the District of Columbia.”

LABOR LEGISLATION AND DECISIONS OF COURTS.---This presentation consists of a reproduction of the labor laws enacted at the 1905 session of the State legislature and extracts from recent (1904-5) decisions of the New Jersey courts on cases affecting the interests of labor.

INDUSTRIAL CHRONOLOGY.—This industrial record is for the year ending September 30, 1905. The record presents, by date and locality, accounts of accidents to workmen, changes in hours of labor, closing of factories (partial or total), damage to manufacturing plants by fire or flood, enlargement of manufacturing plants, establishment of new manufacturing plants, incorporation of new industries, increases and reductions in wages, industrial plants that have left the State and that have moved into the State from elsewhere, organization of new labor unions, litigation in connection with manufacturing plants, strikes and lockouts, and wage-scale and working-hour demands of labor unions.

OREGON.

Second Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the State of

Oregon, 1905-6. 0. P. Hoff, Commissioner. 229 pp. The present report, the second biennial issued by the bureau, presents a variety of subjects pertaining directly and indirectly to labor and industrial conditions.

LABOR LAWS AND DECISIONS OF COURTS.—This section of the report consists, principally, of a reproduction of the laws of the State relating to labor, and two decisions of the supreme court in 1906 sustaining the validity of the ten-hour law for females and the childlabor law.

LABOR ORGANIZATIONS.-Reports were received from 96 unions, having a total membership of 9,252, giving date of organization, membership of each union, membership fees, monthly dues, strike, sick, and funeral benefits, wages and hours of labor, regulations governing apprenticeship, number of members idle, etc.

STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS.—Brief accounts are given of 9 strikes and i lockout which occurred in the State during the twelve months ending September 30, 1906.

INDUSTRIES.--Reports from various manufacturing, agricultural, transportation, and other industries of the State present capital and output, wages and hours of labor, number of employees, and miscelreported by 33. The 35 canneries gave employment to 4,898 wageearners—2,092 males and 2,806 females. The selling value of the product amounted to $1,703,389.

THE POTTERY INDUSTRY.-A canvass of the potteries in the city of Trenton was made by the Bureau of Labor in 1904 for the purpose of gaining, as nearly as possible, an exact knowledge of the health conditions prevalent in the industry. Returns were received from 33 potteries, which employed at the time of making the canvass an aggregate of 3,751 work people, about 675 of whom were females. The results of the inquiry showed that the conditions peculiar to the industry, which produced diseases in former years, had, to a fairly large extent, passed away as a result of improved factory buildings and the adoption in many old potteries of the latest methods of sanitation and ventilation; yet much remains to be done if the trade is made absolutely healthful. Physicians whose practice lies largely among potteries and who were consulted on the subject of diseases peculiar to the potter's trade stated that there has been a pronounced decline during recent years in potter's tuberculosis, asthma, lead colic, and other forms of illness. With regard to accidents in the potteries where all modern safeguards have been adopted, the only dangerous work now is said to be about the kilns, and the risks connected with them are slight. Dust, once a prolific cause of asthma and consumption, has, to a large extent, ceased to be so, all sweeping and cleaning up being done at night. During recent years the social condition of the potters has steadily improved.

THE GLASS INDUSTRY.This is a review of the changes in wages and in methods of production in the glass industry of the State from 1875 to 1905. The information was obtained from men who had followed the trade as blowers during the thirty-year period, or for an even greater length of time, and who were thoroughly familiar with every new feature introduced into the process of manufacture during that time, and also from the records of the largest and oldest glass-making plants. But the main purpose of the inquiry was to ascertain the trend of glass blowers' wages during the period of time under review, improvements in process of manufacture being noticed only in so far as they may have affected the question of wages. It was found impossible to obtain wage data for each year of the period separately, but average earnings covering various periods were determined with approximate correctness. Up to 1879 the average earnings of blowers appears to have been $3.83 per day; from 1879 to 1890 the average was about $4.83 per day; from 1890 to 1905 the. average has been about $5 per day.

THE EIGHT-HOUR MOVEMENT.— This part cf the report reviews the investigation made by the Federal Government, during the

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Fifty-eighth Congress, concerning the relation of the shorter workday to cost of production, preparatory to the consideration of House bill, No. 4064, “limiting the hours of daily service of laborers and mechanics employed upon work done for the United States, or for any Territory, or for the District of Columbia.”'

LABOR LEGISLATION AND DECISIONS OF COURTS.--This presentation consists of a reproduction of the labor laws enacted at the 1905 session of the State legislature and extracts from recent (1904-5) decisions of the New Jersey courts on cases affecting the interests of labor.

INDUSTRIAL CHRONOLOGY.—This industrial record is for the year ending September 30, 1905. The record presents, by date and locality, accounts of accidents to workmen, changes in hours of labor, closing of factories (partial or total), damage to manufacturing plants by fire or flood, enlargement of manufacturing plants, establishment of new manufacturing plants, incorporation of new industries, increases and reductions in wages, industrial plants that have left the State and that have moved into the State from elsewhere, organization of new labor unions, litigation in connection with manufacturing plants, strikes and lockouts, and wage-scale and working-hour demands of labor unions.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

OREGON.

[ocr errors]

Second Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the State of

Oregon, 1905-6. 0. P. Hoff, Commissioner. 229 pp.

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

The present report, the second biennial issued by the bureau, presents a variety of subjects pertaining directly and indirectly to labor and industrial conditions.

LABOR LAWS AND DECISIONS OF COURTS.—This section of the report consists, principally, of a reproduction of the laws of the State relating to labor, and two decisions of the supreme court in 1906 sustaining the validity of the ten-hour law for females and the childlabor law.

LABOR ORGANIZATIONS.-Reports were received from 96 unions, having a total membership of 9,252, giving date of organization, membership of each union, membership fees, monthly dues, strike, sick, and funeral benefits, wages and hours of labor, regulations governing apprenticeship, number of members idle, etc.

STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS.-Brief accounts are given of 9 strikes and 1 lockout which occurred in the State during the twelve months ending September 30, 1906.

INDUSTRIES.-Reports from various manufacturing, agricultural, transportation, and other industries of the State present capital and output, wages and hours of labor, number of employees, and ”

laneous data. In the woolen mills of the State the following average daily wages were paid in the different occupations: Foremen....

$3.00 Sorters and pullers (male).

1. 81 Dry-house men.....

1. 21 Pickers..

1.52 Carders.

1.30 Spinners (male)

1.92 Spinners (female).

1. 59 Spoolers and dressers (male).

1.54 Spoolers and dressers (female).

1.27 Weavers (male)..

2. 09 Weavers (female).....

1. 42 Finishers, wet (male).

1. 59 Finishers, dry (male).

1. 55 Finishers, dry (female).

1. 25 Engineers and firemen.

1. 96 Watchmen.....

2. 49 Workers not classified (male)..

1. 48 MISCELLANEOUS.-Other subjects given consideration in the report are domestic help; education; accidents in factories, sawmills, and at logging; Chinese and Japanese; for each county of the State an account of its physical aspects, products, resources, transportation facilities, wages paid farm, ranch, and other labor, and various additional items of general information; and for each incorporated city and town its population, elevation, principal industries, transportation facilities, value of public buildings, cost of light and water service to consumers, cost of police and fire service, wages paid day labor, etc.

UTAH.

Reports of the Bureau of Statistics of the State of Utah for the years

1901 to 1906. Charles De Moisey, Commissioner (1901 to 1904); Fred W. Price, Commissioner (1905 and 1906). 6 vols.; 527 pp.

The law creating the Utah bureau of statistics became effective May 13, 1901, the duties of the bureau as set forth in the act being to collect, assort, systematize, and present in annual reports statistical details relating to agriculture, mining, manufacturing, and other industries of the State. The first report of the bureau (for the year 1901) was presented to the governor of the State on January 10, 1902.

Returns relating to statistics of agriculture show that for the fiveyear period 1901 to 1905 monthly wages, including board, of farm hands were as follows: In 1901 farm hands received an average wage of $29.25 per month, in 1902 an average wage of $29.78 per month, in 1903 an average wage of $30.01 per month, in 1904 an average wage of $31.10 per month, and in 1905 an average wage of $31.07 per

« PreviousContinue »