Page images
PDF
EPUB

INDIANA.

Eleventh Biennial Report of the Bureau of Statistics for 1905 and 1906.

Joseph H. Stubbs, Chief of Bureau.

780 pp.

The subjects presented in this report are as follows: List of Indiana factories, 206 pages; list of domestic and foreign bureaus of labor statistics, 3 pages; social statistics, 124 pages; economic statistics, 302 pages; industrial statistics, 65 pages; agricultural statistics, 54 pages.

LIST OF FACTORIES.— A list of the factories in the State in 1905 is presented by counties, giving name of factory, town in which located, and nature of product. Including those of every description, Indiana had in 1905 a total of 8,207 factories.

INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS.—The subjects considered in this division of the report relate to manufactures, labor organizations, banks and trust companies, steam railroads, electric railroads, coal mines, and stone quarries.

MANUFACTURES.—Under this presentation are included only those factories of the State which had in 1905 a product of $500 or upward. The following is a summarized statement of the returns from the factories for the year 1905: Factories whose output was over $500....

7, 912 Capital invested.....

$312, 071, 234 Salaried officers and clerks.

14, 862 Amount paid in salaries..

$15, 028, 789 Average number of wage-earners.

154, 174 Amount paid in wages..

$72, 058, 099 Miscellaneous expenses.

$46, 682, 513 Cost of materials..

$220, 507, 007 Value of products (including custom work and repairing)...

$393, 954, 405 The largest average number of wage-earners employed during any one month of the year was in the month of September, the number being 164,568—136,446 males 16 years of age or over, 24,099 females 16 years of age or over, and 4,023 children under 16 years of age.

LABOR ORGANIZATIONS.—There were 10 international organizations in 1905 with headquarters in Indiana, 3 of which were not affiliated with the American Federation of Labor. In 1905 there were 1,280 local trade unions in the State, 1,278 of which belonged to the 87 national and international organizations. The reported membership of these local unions was 72,504. Sick benefits were paid by 50 of the 87 national and international organizations. The average weekly sum for sick benefits locally was $4.43, and the total paid out during the year was $32,780. Death benefits were paid by 71 of the organizations. The average death benefit locally was $204.84, and the total paid out during the year was $185,186.94. Strike benefits were paid by 72 of the organizations. The average weekly sum for strike benefits locally was $5.99, and the total paid out during the year was $11,234.85. Traveling benefits were paid by 22 of the organizations, and the total paid out during the year locally was $8,335.95. Out-of-work benefits were paid by 17 of the organizations, and the total paid out during the year locally was $2,057.82. In the different trades the average daily wages of journeymen were $2.75 and of apprentices $1.67. The average length of apprenticeship was 3 years and the ratio of apprentices to journeymen 1 to 8.

STEAM RAILROADS.—The operations of the steam railroads in Indiana for the two years ending June 30, 1906, are reported under this head, and show earnings and expenses, passenger and freight traffic, employees and wages paid, and accidents. The following table shows, for 1905 and 1906, number of employees in each occupation and average wages per day and average earnings per year:

AVERAGE WAGES PER DAY AND AVERAGE EARNINGS PER YEAR OF RAILROAD

EMPLOYEES, 1905 AND 1906.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The falling off in the number of employees in 1906 as compared with 1905 is accounted for by the fact that only in the later year were some of the larger companies, operating also in other States, able to separate the returns in regard to their roads in Indiana from those of the entire system.

As the result of accidents on steam railroads in the State for the year ending June 30, 1905, 354 persons were killed (8 passengers, 112 employees, and 234 others) and 3,809 injured (221 passengers, 3,289 employees, and 299 others); for the year ending June 30, 1906, there were 358 killed (5 passengers, 115 employees, and 238 others) and 4,316 injured (342 passengers, 3,531 employees, and 443 others).

ELECTRIC RAILROADS.-In 1906 there were 32 electric railroads in operation in Indiana and 4 in process of construction. Statements are presented showing earnings and expenses, passenger and freight business, number of employees and wages paid, and number of accidents and amount paid in damages. Including officers and clerks, the roads employed 3,337 persons in 1905 and 4,095 in 1906, to whom were paid in salaries and wages $2,003,161 in 1905 and $2,524,475 in 1906. In 1906 the average daily wages of motormen were $1.88; of conductors, $1.89, and of linemen, $2.26. As the result of accidents, in 1905 there were 40 persons killed and 4,346 injured, and in 1906 there were 53 killed and 4,852 injured. In 1905 damages were paid to the amount of $96,061 for accidents, and in 1906 to the amount of $166,928.

COAL MINES.-During the year ending December 31, 1905, there were 202 coal mines in operation in the State. These mines were in operation an average of 150 days and produced 10,996,170 tons of coal. There were 18,811 workmen employed and 313 persons in offices at the mines. The wages paid aggregated $9,387,210, of which $6,465,578 was paid to inside workmen. Salaries paid aggregated $501,355.

STONE QUARRIES.—There were 79 stone quarries in Indiana in 1906, which were in operation an average of 222 days each. The quarries gave employment to 3,686 workmen, who quarried 1,761,883 cubic yards of stone and to whom was paid $1,619,836 in wages. To 151 office employees was paid $210,491 in salaries.

[ocr errors]

NEW JERSEY.

Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Bureau of Statistics of Labor and

Industries of New Jersey, for the year ending October 31, 1905. W. C. Garrison, Chief. iv, 429 pp.

This report consists of four parts, in which the following subjects are presented: Statistics of manufactures, 121 pages; steam railroads, 12 pages; cost of living, 17 pages; fruit and vegetable canning, 8 pages; health conditions of the pottery industry, 21 pages; wages and production in the glass industry, 12 pages; the eight-hour movement, 23 pages; labor legislation and decisions of courts, 17 pages; industrial chronology, 175 pages.

STATISTICS OF MANUFACTURES.—This presentation of the statistics of manufactures is based on returns for the year 1904, secured from 1,756 industrial establishments, 1,698 representing 88 specified industries and 58 grouped as unclassified. The facts are set out in eleven tables, which show by industries the number of establishments owned by corporations and by partnerships and individuals, amount of capital invested, value of materials and of products, number of wage-earners and wages and earnings, number of salaried employees and amount paid in salaries, days in operation and hours worked per day and per week, and character of power used. .

The returns show that of the 1,756 establishments reporting, 1,001 were under the corporate form of ownership and management and 755 were owned and managed by partnerships and private individuals. Capital invested showed an aggregate of $509,758,252, value of materials or stock used of $341,074,722, and value of products or goods made of $578,647,032. The total paid in wages amounted to $98,104,992. There was an average of 208,526 wageearners employed during the year, 147,700 males 16 years of age or over, 53,960 females 16 years of age or over, and 6,866 children under 16 years of age. To 1,841 salaried officers was paid a total of $6,315,139, and to 13,673 salaried employees (superintendents, managers, foremen, clerks, etc.), a total of $15,110,970. Under normal conditions, the average number of hours worked per day for the 1,756 establishments was 9.78, and the average number of hours worked per week 55.58. The average number of days in operation during the year was 287.99.

The table following presents, by age and sex, the total number and the per cent of wage-earners employed in 1904 in all industries (1,756 establishments) at the specified weekly rates of wages: NUMBER AND PER CENT OF WAGE-EARNERS OF EACH AGE AND SEX IN ALL INDUSTRIES (1,756 ESTABLISHMENTS), BY CLASSIFIED WEEKLY RATES OF WAGES, 1904.

Number.

Per cent.

Classified weekly

wages.

Males 16 Females Children
years of 16 years under
age or of age or 16 years
over. over.

Total.

Males 16 Females Children

under age or

of age or 16 years over. over.

years of

16 years

Total.

of age.

of age.

Under $3..
$3 or under $4.
$4 or under $5.
$5 or under $6.
$6 or under $7.
$7 or under $8.
$8 or under $9.
$9 or under $10.
$10 or under $12.
$12 or under $15.
$15 or under $20.
$20 or under $25.
$25 or over.

1,985
3, 234
5,595
6,037
8,614
12, 406
14,300
23, 041
25, 512
26, 522
26,814
7,051
4,171

3, 489 5,548 10,076 10, 786 9, 045 6, 271 4,334 3,018 2, 307 1,321 332 18 2

1,698
3, 490
1,538

448
185
18
12

7,172
12, 272
17, 209
17, 271
17,844
18, 695
18, 646
26, 059
27,819
27, 843
27, 146
7,069
4, 173

1.2 2.0 3.4 3.7 5. 2 7.5 8.6 13.9 15.4 16.0 16.2 4.4 2.5

6.2
9.8
17.8
19.1
16.0
11.1
7.7
5.3
4.1
2.3

.6
(a)
(a)

23.0
47.2
20.8
6.1
2.4
.3
.2

3.1 5.4 7.5 7.5 7.8 8.2 8.1 11.4 12.1 12.1 11.8 3.1 1.9

Total.

165, 282

56, 547

7,389

229, 218

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

a Less than 0.05 per cent.

The following comparative table shows for selected industries, for the years 1903 and 1904, the average number of persons employed per establishment and the average yearly earnings per employee:

AVERAGE EMPLOYEES PER ESTABLISHMENT AND AVERAGE YEARLY EARNINGS.

PER EMPLOYEE, 1903 AND 1904.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

Artisans' tools
Boilers, steam
Brewery products
Brick and terra cotta.
Chemical products
Cigars andtobacco
Drawn wire and wire cloth.
Electrical appliances..
Furnaces, ranges, and heaters.
Glass, window and bottle.
Hats, men's.
Jewelry...
Leather, tanning and finishing.
Lamps, electric and other.
Machinery
Metal goods
Oils..
Paper
Pottery
Rubber products, hard and soft.
Shipbuilding.
Silk, broad and ribbon.
Smelting and refining precious metals
Steel and iron, structural.
Steel and iron, forging..
Woolen and worsted goods..

Twenty-six industries.
Other industries

52 155

61 101 128 189 604 115 124 263 109 35 83 410 157

88 348

59 102 132 328 191 276 144 198 318

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

95 61 12 33 34 33 10 123

9 19 12 26

340
177

91
280

60 116 157 381 183 260 176 245 323

940
871

917
839

[blocks in formation]

494. 41
436.25

492.46 436. 20

[blocks in formation]

STEAM RAILROADS.-For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1905, the 7 railroads in the State employed 37,953 persons for an average of 296 days per person, each working an average of 10.4 hours per day. The total paid in wages amounted to $23,168,811, the average wages per day being $2.06 and the average yearly earnings per employee $610.46. Four of the companies reported the number of employees injured during the year as 1,323. The injuries of 60 resulted in death.

Cost OF LIVING.–This is a continuation of the presentation of previous years, and shows the retail prices of 50 items of food and other commodities in the principal markets in all counties of the State in the month of June, 1905. Comparisons with retail prices in 1904 and in 1898 (the year the investigation was begun) are also given. Taken together, the prices of the commodities in 1905 as compared with the prices in 1898 showed an increase of 16.8 per cent, or an average increase from

year

of 2.4 per cent. FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CANNING.-In 1904 there were 35 canneries from which returns were received. Invested capital to the amount of $754,671 and wages paid to the amount of $342,305 were

16251-08-13

to year

« PreviousContinue »