Annual Report of the Secretary of War

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1937
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 15 - June 29, 1944, with a view to insuring the territorial integrity of the Philippines, the mutual protection of the Philippines and the United States of America...
Page 51 - ... inclusive, or as a student at service schools, other than those of the noncombatant branches, at any time, shall be regarded as satisfying the requirements of service with combatant arms. Existing laws in so far as they restrict the detail or assignment of officers are hereby repealed. The...
Page 83 - ... hold their present grades on the retired list through an advancement of one grade under the act of Congress approved April 23, 1904, making a total of...
Page 70 - General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant...
Page 15 - Affairs, should be created to study trade relations between the United States and the Philippines and to recommend a program for the adjustment of the Philippine national economy.
Page 49 - The Secretary of War shall annually report to Congress the numbers, grades, and assignments of the officers and enlisted men of the Army, and the number, kinds, and strength of organizations pertaining to each branch of the service.
Page 41 - War for transmittal to Congress, a full statement of the financial and other affairs of the Home. BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS The government and control of the United States Soldiers...
Page 47 - That hereafter, and beginning with the first calendar month after the passage of this act, there shall be deducted each month from the pay of each enlisted man and warrant officer on the active list of the Regular Army, exclusive of the Philippine Scouts, a sum not to exceed 25 cents, which sum shall be passed to the credit of the permanent fund, United States Soldiers...
Page 90 - Section 48 of the National Defense Act, as amended by the act of June 5, 1920 (41 Stat.
Page 5 - It should be borne in mind that modern aircraft cannot be quickly improvised. The construction of airplanes necessarily takes considerable time. Hence, our peacetime strength should approximate rather closely our requirements in war. Furthermore, in a major war our air arm would probably be engaged almost immediately on the opening of hostilities. Therefore, it is desirable that it be practically on a war footing in time of peace.

Bibliographic information