Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic]

Pioto and copyright by Underwood & l'nderwood I SPLENDIHIYEOLIPPED CIRITT 1.ICTORY OF SINTA GERTRUDE, NEIR ORIZABA,

MEXICO During the rule of Portirio Diaz textile factories, employing thousands of laboring people, came into existence in Mexico. They were mostly owned by foreign capital, and through them a midille class was gradually being developed.

HOSORS TO COLOSEL GOETUILS

65:

U. S. ARMY

The United States has made the world I am glad that this thing was not done very uncomfortable, but it has at least by private enterprise, and that there is no done so by the exercise of extraordinary thought of private profit anywhere in it, dynamic qualities. It is not one of the but that a government put itself at the statical nations of the world. It is one service of the world and used a great of the nations which has disturbed equi man to do a great thing: That is the libriums, which has cut new pathis for the ideal of the modern world, that the serithought and action of mankind.

ices to mankind shall be commonly And now there is to be elevated and shared. kept always on high at this new gate, And so I esteem it a real privilege, upon which men are to enter the roads acting on behalf of this Society, to preof new experience, a name which will sent to you, Colonel Goethals, this very not be blotted out until and unless the beautiful medal. It is made of mere whole civilization of the world should gold, and gold is of no consequence in change, the name of Colonel Goethals. this connection, sir; but it speaks, in the

The government of the United States most precious metal we know, the gratilent him to the world, and he has done tude and the admiration of the nation. this thing for the world, for it is our

RESPONSE BY COI. GEORGT W GOFTILSLS, proud boast that we have cut this highway for all the sea-going ships of the world.

Mr. President, it is an easier task to

build the Panama Canal than it is for me GAILLARD, GORGIS, SIBIRT, IIODGES

to find words to express appreciation of I take it for granted that we do not to the honor conferred upon me by the Nanight forget that distinguished group of tional Geographic Society and the dismen who have been associated with Col tinguished manner in which the presenonel Goethals; that gallant and devoted tation of the medal has been made. This soldier, Colonel Gaillard, who gave his medal represents the satisfaction of the very life to see that a great work was National Geographic Society at the pracdone at the Culebra Cut; that man who tical completion of the canal and its apmade so much of this work possible, proval of the services rendered. Those Surgeon General Gorgas, by knowing services are not only individual services, how to hold disease off at arm's length but national services. The French were while these men were given leave to the pioneers in the undertaking. But for work; also Colonel Sibert, who built the the work that they did on the Isthmus Gatun Dam and created the Gatun Lake, We could not today regard the canal as making it look to the eyes of the unin practically completed. But for the Engitiated as if nature had done the work lish we probably would not have known over which he himself presided, and also the means of eradicating malaria : the Colonel Hodges, who made the locks and death rate would have been great. the machinery by which these great things Among individuals we have national repare administered.

resentatives in the Spanish and the EngBut we are merely tonight acknowledg- lish in our laboring force. ing the presiding character and genius The canal has been the work of many, which drew all the elements of this work and it has been the pride of the Imertogether, which made it a work done by icans who have visited the canal to find colaborers, not by rivals; work done as the spirit which animated the forces, if it were the conception of a single Every man was doing the particular part mind; work done in the spirit of service of the work that was necessary to make and self-effacement which belongs to a it a success. No chief of any enterprise great servant of a great government. ever commanded an army that was so There is nothing selfish in the eminence loval, so faithful, that gave its strength of Colonel Goethals. It is representative and its blood to the successful completion of a great profession. It is representa of its task as the canal forces. tive of a great government. It is repre Ind so in accepting the medal and sentative of a great spirit.

thanking the National Geographic So

[ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

on this

ciell for it, I accept it and thank them in told me before that this Society was carthe name of cery member of the canal rying on an investigation-one of the m.

many investigations of these days

which was to result in finding a way by SECRETIRI

which people should work only two The Isthmian Canal is an international weeks in the year and live in happiness 11ork. 11 connects the oceans that vashi

and plenty all the rest of the time. low, the shores of every land, and through it if your Society manages to achieve this will pass the commerce of all the nations. vlonderful result I hope it will be applied It is filling, therefore, that lie shall have 10 the foreign ambassadors to the United its participants in the program of this States, because that lould mean only (lening those who in an eminent way fourteen speeches a year instead of about represent the nations which will take one hundred or more. conspicuouis advantage of the opportuni These diplomats always feel at liome lies which this canal will offer, and at in a society of geographers, because ile our table tonight wie hulle as one of the are what I might perhaps call practical Speakers the representative of one of the geographers. Without knowing where great nations of Europe, one of the na lle are going or whence we come, le are lions whose growing neets are known in sent all over the globe and we regard the ill the corners of the Carih. I have the whole universe as our home. It is not honor to call upon lis lixcellency: the aluay's so pleasant as it is here, and we Imbassador from Germani; to give his are iherefore very glad when testimony to the greatness of this under large globe ire find such a pleasant and taking and pay his respects to the genius hospitable home as we all find in the under whose guidance the work has been United States. accomplished.

Is a German, I would like to remind

you of an incident in the life of perhaps ADDRESS BY TIN CTRILLV LJILISSADOR,

the greatest of my compatriots, Goethe, UJIBISS.IDOR VON DIRSSTORTT

who a hundred years ago, shortly before When I received the kind invitation to liis death, las sitting among his most inattend this splendid banquet, I accepted timate friends, and had just received a with the greatest pleasure because it af book written by Tlexander von Humforded me the occasion 10

boldt, a name which is familiar to geogfriendly relations with Colonel Goethals, raphers all over the world. It gave à dethe greatest engineer of these days, who scription of Mexico and the surrounding has presented to the llorld an engineer countries, and after having read this ing seat which in ancient day's would book Goethe said to his friends, “I am a have been called one of the Seren1 do very old man, and I have only one wish: not know how many onders of the that is that I could live long enough to lorld we have now.

see the l'anama Canal built.' I had also wished 10 meet the chum He added that he was sure this canal ing wife of Colone Goethals, with whom would be built by the people of the I had formerly spent it very pleasant Luited States, because he sail by the lick on the ocean. I was not disap- energy and enterprise with which they pointed in that, as I had the pleasure of colonized the whole west of this great sitting next to her at dinner.

country that they could surely not miss In one way, however, I must confess the opportunity of building this canal. I that I was very much isppointed this wish I could evoke his spirit to be among ciening; because I had been told that I us today. lle might find it a queer coinwas to have a very good time tonight and cidence that his name is so much like the a night off from speaking. I quarter of name of the great man who built this an hour ago, however, I was asked to say canal. a few words to you, and I am very glad Refore sitting down I wish to thank to have this opportunity to thank you for you once more for your kind hospitality the splendid hospitality afforded me, and for the great pleasure you have ai

The presiding officer of your Society forded me tonight.

renc

[ocr errors]
[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Photo and copyright by Cuder wood & C'nderwood THE CATHEDRAL —THE GREATEST OF MEXICAN CHURCHES: NORTHWEST FRON TIU)

NATIONAL PALACE ROOF, CITY OF MEXICO The cathedral of Mexico City is said to be the largest church in the Western World. It stands on the site of the great temple of the Aztecs, where tens of thousands of prisoners were sacrificed to the sun. Its foundations are composed almost entirely of Aztec images. Its inside dimensions are: length, 387 feet; width, 177 feet, and height, 179 feet. It is estimated that it cost some $2,000,000.

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

l'hoto and copyright by Underwood & Underwood TU VLAGNIFICENT POPOCITELITI, TROM THE LARGEST OF THE INCIENT AZTEC

PYRAMIDS AT CHOLULA, MEXICO The landscapes on the great Mexican plateau are always filled with interest. A dozen cities surround cach of the great Mexican volcanoes, and whether Popo is viewed from Puebla, Mexico City. Amocameca, Cholula, or Cuautla, it is always the same graceful mountain (see also pages 630 and 641).

« PreviousContinue »