Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors]

GROUP TAKEN IN CALCUTTA DURING THE VISIT OF H. R. II., THE PRINCE OF WALES
Tirom left to right: Bhutan Orderly, Mr. R. E. Holland, Foreign Office; Captain Hyslop, 93d Higlanders, on special duty during H. R. H.'s
visit; Sir Ugyen, Ugen Dorji, the author, Rai Lolzang Chuden Sahib, Jerung Dewan, H. H. the Maharaja of Sikkim, Barmiak Kazi, H. H. the
Maharani of Sikkim, Bhutan Orderly, Sikkim Orderly.

[graphic]

Afgbanistan

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

Goalpara OUTILNE; IL\

POL BHUTAN, SHOWING JOURNEYS BY JOHN CLAUDE WHITE (SEE PAGE 365)

[graphic][subsumed][ocr errors]

TIL ITOME OF THE NATIONAL, GEOGRAPITIC SOCIETY On the right is the Gardiner Greene Hubbard Hall, erected for the Society by the heirs of its first President. In this beautiful building are he vard rooms and ibrary. The administration building adjoining, which has just been completed, is devoted to the cditorial and business offices of the Magazine. The Society's spacious home is located on Sixteenth street, one of Washington's most lieautiful boulevards, where many of the foreign embassies are located and live squares north of the White House. Mr. Arthur B. Heaton is the architect of the new building, which was built by the George A. Fuller C.

THE NATIONAL GEOGR \PHIC SOCIETY

155

The main glacier was most beautiful, known sort. I had made use of coolies, looking like a curious broad staircase of elephants, mules, ponies, donkeys, yaks, snowy whiteness, leading from where we

oxen, carts, pony-traps, rail, and steamer, stood heavenward. There were several and the only available animal I had not fine waterfalls gushing out from holes in employed was the Tibetan pack-sheep. the cliffs high above us and disappearing I hope I may have interested my readbefore they reached the path, the rivulets ers by my account of this hitherto-wof water oozing out again from the banks known country, one so little known that of the main stream, showing that the wa as recently as 1890 a high Indian official ter had resumed a subterranean course. wrote most undeservedly, as my exploraA curious feature about the falls was that tions proved: "No one wishes to explore as the power of the sun increased so did that tangle of jungle-clad and feverthe waterfalls visibly increase in size. stricken hills, infested with leeches and Our camp that night was a cheery one the pipsa-fly, and offering 110 compensatand we relieved the time by learning, to ing advantages to the most enterprising the great amusement of the bystanders, pioneer. Adventure looks beyond Bluto play Bhutanese backgammon, our im tan. Science passes it by as a region not plements being two wooden dice, a col sufficiently characteristic to merit special lection of little wooden sticks of varying exploration." length, and a handful of beans.

And with this quotation I must close A short march brought us to the Phew for the present, though later I hope to la, or Ling-shi-La, over which pass we give the readers of the NITIONAL GEOcrossed into Tibet.

GRAPHIC MAGAZINE some of my impresBy this time the different kinds of sions of Tibet itself, in which country I transport I had used during my tours had have also done a certain amount of trai'included, I should think, about every cling

THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY AND

ITS NEW BUILDING

B

UILT with the solidity of a gov- cieties, being a small institution with ernment building, planned as a many ambitions, which the limitations of

model of what a building may be its funds prevented being fulfilled except as the home of a great society and as the in an imperfect way. Then, in 180X), quarters of a large office force, the new came a ne idea. Why not popularize building of the National Geographic So the science of geography and take it into ciety combines every feature that mod the homes of the people? Why not transern architecture and sanitary engineer form the Society's Magazine from one of ing had to suggest toward making it the cold geographic fact, expressed in hicroarchitectural representation of the ideals glyphic terms which the layman could of the Society.

not understand, into a vehicle for carryIts splendid proportions are typical of ing the living, breathing, human-interest the wonderful growth of a great move

facts about this great world of ours to ment for the increase and diffusion of the people? Would not that be the greatgeographic knowledge. That movement est agency of all for the diffusion of began with the founding of the National geographic knowledge? Geographic Society, "for the increase

I GEOGRAPHIC UWIKENING and diffusion of geographic knowledge,” January 27, 1888, by a small band of Ilith an affirmative answer, a new era explorers and scientists.

in geographic education dawned.

The For some ten years the Society fol National Geographic Society found the lowed the usual course of scientific S0 whole world ready to enrich the pages of

[graphic]

GENERAL OFFICE: TO LEFT OF ENTRANCE OF NEW ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

Where visiting members are received. The entrance and Reception-room are finished in Botticini and Tennessee marble

« PreviousContinue »