Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][merged small][merged small]

A great-crested flycatcher house, with bluebird, suspended from a pear tree, from which Mr. Dodson last year picked eight bushels of pears with not a worm hole in one, and that notwithstanding the fact that the tree had never been sprayed. A fycatcher is certainly a cheaper investment than a spraying-machine.

"About houses and buildings, particularly those on our farms, the ordinary type of birdhouse rather than the hollow log is perhaps more appropriate. Bluebirds, tree-swallows, and house-wrens take to them readily, and if you have a large house on a high pole you may be lucky enough to attract a colony of martins" (see text, page 341 ).

completely metamorphosed into a very Mr. Ilerbert K. Job, State Ornitholoattractive and interesting spot, replete gist of Connecticut, is having some very with bird life.

interesting experiences on a game preIf wild rice can be made to grow, serve in Connecticut, where low-lying ducks will be sure to come in greater areas have been flooded and the wild numbers each year, while regular feeding ducks attracted in increasing numbers with corn at proper times may prove an each year from miles around (see picture, additional attraction to whole flocks of

page 338). ducks during the migration. Tame call I know of one man in Canada who ducks may be introduced, and if there are several years ago fed a small flock of near-by woods nest boxes for the attrac wild geese that chanced to alight in a tion of the wood-ducks should be put up. pond close beside his house. The geese

One may even go into the raising of appreciated the treatment so much that ducks, though this is often both bother they later returned with friends, and some and expensive, while the simple have kept it up from year to year until flooding of a meadow and intelligent now I believe that he has had at one time planting of its shores is comparatively several hundred wild geese virtuallı in little trouble.

his front yard, and in a very exposed

[graphic][ocr errors]

A FLOCK OF LILLARDS IS VISITORS

Plioto by Dr. John C. Phillips "If wild rice can be made to grow, ducks will be sure to come in greater numbers each year, while regular feeding with corn at proper times may prove an additional attraction to whole flocks of ducks during the migration. Tame call-ducks may be introduced, and if there are near-by woods, nest-boxes for the attraction of the wood-ducks should be put up" (sce page 3.37).

[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

"Wr. Herbert K. Job, State Ornithologist of Connecticut, is having some very interesting experiences on a game preserve in Connecticut. where low-lying areas have been flooded and the wild ducks attracted in increasing numbers cach year from miles around" (see page 337).

[graphic]

SONG-SPARROWS TAKING A BATH

Photo by Ernest Harold Baynes "A pool with foundation of concrete sunken in the ground

can be made a very interesting feature of any garden, to say nothing of its attractiveness to birds. It is essential, however, that the slope of the sides should be gradual and the water at the edges shallow” (see page 333).

position at that. They seem absolutely He attracted numbers of different kinds fearless, come and go at will, though only of birds and animals, and he seems to a short distance away are gunners who have had no end of fun with it. It is not are waiting to take a crack at them. allowed to all of us, however, to be given

Only a few of us have ponds to which either the opportunity or the enthusiasm geese may be attracted, but the above ex

possessed by Mr. Seton. periment shows what can be and has been Of the various kinds of houses space done in the way of attracting and taming will allow but brief mention. On my own locally the shy wild geese.

place, which is covered largely with

woods, I have used the Berlepsch type of HOUSES FOR THE BIRDS

vertical boxes with considerable success. Of bird-houses, to be supplied for those These are simply sections of logs, holbirds that nest about buildings or in lowed out by special machinery in a very holes of trees, there seems to be an al particular manner to represent woodmost infinite variety: tree stumps, real or pecker cavities, with entrance hole in artificial, boxes, cottages, houses, large side of desired diameter, and covered by and elaborate mansions, barrel-houses, a wooden cap or roof that may be lifted gourds, flower-pots, tin-cans, shelves, for purposes of investigation or in order and all kinds of contraptions.

that the nests may be cleaned out from Mr. Ernest Thompson Seton went so time to time, the whole bolted to an far as to construct on his place in Con oaken batten, by which they may be fasnecticut a huge artificial stump, filled tened to trees (see pages 323 and 325). with imitation woodpeckers' holes, etc. These may be obtained in Germany,

1.1: ILTIMORE ORIOLI TFTER A BATII

Photo by Ernest Harold Baynes The Baltimore oriole is remarkable for its bright colors, and to these it owes its name, as the livery of the Lords Baltimore, who founded Maryland, was orange and black of just those tones that the bird exhibits. Cats have been eliminated on this place.

[graphic][merged small][merged small]

"'\Vater, particularly during the summer montlis or times of drought, is necessary for the birds. If they can't get it on your place, they will be forced to look elsewhere. The proper installment of a drinking fountain or bird bath is a simple affair, and one that is most sure to prove a great attraction to the birds, as well as a never-failing source of catertuinment to the owner" (see Text, page 333).

[graphic][merged small][merged small]

This colony of swallows built their nests beneath the caves of a barn at Luenburg, lt. Note the partial support given by the narrow molding. These cave swallows become much attached to their homes, and if indisturbed will return year after year with unfailing regularity.

Those on

ITOC'SES

but are now manufactured by at least

DIRDS TILIT WILL NEST IS PREPIRET two people in this country. my place have been occupied by screech owls, bluebirds, chickadees, tree-swal

\bout houses and buildings, particulows, Alickers, white-breasted nuthatches. larly those on our farms, the ordinary and great-crested flycatchers. Tlouse type of bird-house rather than the hollow wrens, which are very local in our part log is perhaps more appropriate. Blueof the country, have so far avoided them, birds, tree-swallows and house-wrens and I have failed ignominiously to at take to them readily, and if you have a tract either the downy or the hairy wood large house on a high pole you may be peckers, both of which frequent my lucky enough to attract a colony of woods.

martins. Chickadees, great-crested fliOne firm makes bird-houses out of catchers, and screech-owls may use these natural hollow logs or limbs, a hole bored boxes, and the following is a list of birds in the side, and with wooden cap and recorded as having bred in nest boxes of bottom, while another makes an imita one sort or another: tion woodpecker's nest of pottery. The Ilood-duck, sparrow-hawki screechDerlepsch type are, however, in my opin- owl. Micker, red-headed woodpecker, ion, far and away ahead of these others. great-crested flycatcher, Starling. Eug

« PreviousContinue »