Hochelaga; or, England in the New World [by G.D. Warburton] ed. E. Warburton

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 183 - ... years from the date of the signature of the present convention, to the vessels, citizens, and subjects of the two Powers: it 'being well understood, that this agreement is not to be construed to the prejudice of any claim, which either of the two high contracting parties may have to any part of the said country, nor shall it be taken to affect the claims of any other Power or State to any part of the said country; the only object of the high contracting parties, in that respect, 'being to prevent...
Page 183 - It is agreed that any country that may be claimed by either party on the northwest coast of America, westward of the Stony Mountains, shall, together with its harbours, bays, and creeks, and the navigation of all rivers within the same, be free and open, for the term of ten years from the date of the signature of the present convention, to the vessels, citizens, and subjects of the two Powers...
Page 253 - ... of both the Canadas, and also of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, a widely scattered population, poor, and apparently unenterprising, though hardy and industrious, separated from each other by tracts of intervening forest, without towns and markets, almost without roads, living in mean houses, drawing little more than a rude subsistence from ill-cultivated land, and seemingly incapable of improving their condition, present the most instructive contrast to their enterprising and thriving neighbours...
Page 241 - The waters which fall from this horrible precipice do foam and boil after the most hideous manner imaginable, making an outrageous noise, more terrible than that of thunder; for when the wind blows out of the south, their dismal roaring may be heard more than fifteen leagues off.
Page 221 - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in. They give their whole form and colour to our lives. According to their quality, they aid morals, they supply them, or they totally destroy them.
Page 280 - Lord's own blessed day, we saw them gathering already around their pastor, who was before his door; their children collecting in the same manner, with their books in their hands, all decently clothed from head to foot: a repose and steadiness in their deportment, at least the seeming indications of a high and controlling influence upon their characters and hearts.
Page 236 - Would ye fain steal a glance o'er life's dark sea, And gaze though trembling on eternity ? Would ye look out, look down, where God hath set His mighty signet ? Come — come higher yet, To the PAGODA'S utmost height ascend, And see earth, air, and sky in one alembic blend !" " The Pagoda is now open to visitors and perfectly secure. * * * Admittance 25 cents. * * * 1st April, 1845.
Page 263 - Most of the present generation among us have been brought up — and lived in the idea that England is supreme in the Congress of Nations'. I am one of that numerous class — long may it be a numerous one ! — but I say with sorrow that a doubt crosses my mind, and something more than a doubt, that this giant son will soon tread on his parent's heels.
Page 183 - Paradise," with specimens. — T. Mcllwraith and TW Reynolds, MD April 6, 1888.— "Notes on the Flora of the 49th Parallel, from the Lake of the Woods to the Rocky Mountains.
Page 31 - It was known that some few still lingered, but they were almost forgotten. " The winter of 1830 was unusually severe in this country, and prolonged beyond those of former years. Towards its close, a settler was hewing down trees at some distance from one of the remote villages, when two gaunt figures crept out from the neighbouring 'bush;' with sad cries and imploring gestures, they tried to express their prayer for help.