Page images
PDF
EPUB

in future, will be remedied. It is extremely dangerous to have loose stone lying about so close to the edge of a quarry, as men in stepping on it are liable to stumble and fall in the quarry, as in this case.

TABLE NO. 22.

SUMMARY of FATAL and NON-FATAL ACCIDENTS, classified according to

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Including persons injured by accidents which proved fatal to fellow workmen.

The death-rates from accidents per 1,000 persons employed were (a) inside the quarries, 1.36; (b) outside the quarries, 42; and (c) inside and outside quarries, 87. In the previous year they were (a) 1·80; (b) ·58; and (c) 1·15.

TABLE NO. 23.

The following table shows the amount of mineral raised, the number of persons employed inside, and the death-rate from accident, from 1895 to 1906, as regards quarries more than 20 feet deep :

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

SECTION IV.

PROSECUTIONS.

Owing to the great difficulty experienced in this and former years to make owners realise that there is a legal obligation to forward the Annual Returns, under the Quarries Act, on or before the 1st of February in each year, I applied for your permission to take legal proceedings against five owners in this district for not having complied with the Act in this respect, and as you were pleased to grant me the permission asked for, I laid informations against them and summonses were issued and heard.

A conviction was obtained in each case and the defendants were fined sums varying from £2 to 10s. Full particulars are given in Appendix II.

These proceedings were taken with great reluctance but, in all the cases, no notice whatever was taken of repeated requests for the returns and warnings of what the penalty on conviction would be and I had no alternative but to report the circumstances to you. I hope the result will be that, in future, the returns will be sent within the legal time allowed by the Act. Delay in doing so by a few owners means that the statistics for the whole of the United Kingdom cannot be completed and to have to make repeated applications to the owners for the returns is a great inconvenience, as at this time of the year there is a great amount of clerical work to be done. So great is this inconvenience that, in future years, I shall be compelled to report every case to you where an owner neglects to send the return, after the time specified by the Act has expired, and has been requested and given a reasonable time to do so, with a view to proceedings being taken against the offenders. I trust, however, that, after this warning, the necessity of adopting extreme measures will not arise.

[blocks in formation]

During the year Special Rules have been established at thirteeen quarries, and at the present time these rules are in force at nearly all the large and important quarries in the district. I am drawing the attention of two other firms to the fact that they have not yet established Special Rules and they have promised to propose the Model Code at once. I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Right Hon. H. J. Gladstone, M.P.,
His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State,
Home Department, London.

W. WALKER.

APPENDIX I.

LIST of FATAL ACCIDENTS in MINES under the COAL MINES REGULATION ACTS in the YORKSHIRE and LINCOLNSHIRE DISTRICT during the Year 1906.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

He and two others were working at a short face in a pillar, and the deceased was in the act of filling a tub when a piece of coal
fell upon and injured him so severely that he died the following morning. It measured 5 feet long by 1 foot 4 inches wide
by 1 foot 5 inches thick, and ought to have been got down.

He was was working with his father, and they were taking out a small pillar between two old roads. The whole of the face had
been holed and the sprags withdrawn, and about 2 of tons of ironstone got down. They were resetting the sprags, with the
intention of making the holing deeper, when another fall occurred and killed the deceased and seriously injured his father.
He was removing some holing dirt when a slab of coal and clod fell from the face and pinned him against a prop. He was so
seriously injured that he died within a few minutes.

On November 14th, 1905, he was bannocking in the Haigh Moor Seam when a piece of coal rolled off the face at a slip or back
en to him. He died in the Leeds Infirmary from a malignant growth on one of his legs, the result of the accident.

He was attempting to get a piece of coal, which was holed 1 foot 6 inches under, and had been standing on a sprag for about a
week, down with a bar, and when it fell some which had not been holed also fell and fatally injured him. When pulling at
the bar he had his back to the coal; if he had had his face and been watching the coal, he could have, in all probability,
got out of the way before it fell.
He was cutting some top coal when about 30 cwt. of coal fell over from the face and displaced three props, one of which struck
him on the head. Died the following day.

He was barring a piece of coal down off the face, and when it fell it caught and crushed him against a prop. He died before
being got out of the pit.

When holding a light for his mate, who was drawing a sprag to drop some holed coal. When the coal fell it knocked out a prop 7 ieet in length, the end of which struck Cryan on the chest and inflcted such injuries that he died the following day.

He was holing a piece of coal which had a loose side, and in addition there was a break 2 ft. from and parallel to the loose side. Notwithstanding this he neglected to set a sprag, and while working the coal fell upon and fatally injured him. The collier in the place did not, as he should have done, see that the deceased, who was his trammer, was complying with the Special Rules and working in safety. Proceedings were taken against him and he was fined 408. and 158. 6d. costs. He was holding a light for his collier while he was baring some coal down when there was bump which burst a piece of coal out of the solid face, it knocked prop out and the prop hit him in the side. Died on October 27th,

Richard Duxbury, Along with his mate he was taking coal off the side of the road to make it wider when a fall, which displaced three props, 52, cccurred, and killed him.

[blocks in formation]

He was taking an empty corf along a road to his working place when a large fall of side took place and buried him, when extricated he was dead.

He was engaged ripping a gate road and after a shot was fired he went down the gate about 12 yards to get a drink out of a bottle. While doing so a piece of stone fell off the side at a slip and fatally injured him.

He was taking an empty tub from the pass-bye into the face when a piece of stone fell from the side and caused such severe injuries that he died on the way to the Barns'ey (Beckett) Hospital.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

(West Riding).

(West Riding).

[blocks in formation]

Died from injuries received, by a fall of stone from the roof of his working place, on November 22nd, 1905.

He was getting coal when a piece of "clod" which was projecting 18 inches from the face broke away suddenly to a weight break and fell upon his thigh causing bruises which at the time were not considered serious. The "clod" should either have been got down or supported with timber. Died February 20th.

When filling a tub in a coal cutting machine face a piece of "clod" 7 ft. long by 3 ft. by 1 to 2 inches thick fell from between two slips on to his shoulders and fractured his spine. Died December 21st. One of the slips could be seen and the stone should have been taken down.

A pot hole in the roof fell out without warning and caught and killed him. The place was well timbered, and until the accident occurred the pot hole was not visible.

When driving a narrow road, skirting the edge of an old goaf, a fall of roof occurred, from two unforeseen slips, at right angles to each other, and killed him.

[ocr errors]

He was cutting out a prop in the goaf with his pick when a large stone fell from a slip in the roof and caused injuries of such a severe nature that he died the same day. It is probable that if the "dog and chain had been used to draw the prop the accident would not have occurred.

He had just got a fall of coal down about 1 ft. 6 ins. in thickness, and was preparing to set a prop when fall of roof occurred and killed him on the spot. There was a smooth parting above the stone and a slip which did not come right through it, and the slip, therefore, was not visible before the fall occurred. The coal he had just got down had been supporting part of the stone. He was in the act of chipping top coal down when the coal and an invisible pot hole suddenly fell upon and fatally injured him.

The deceased was drawing backtimber from the goaf and when striking a blow with a hammer against a prop a large stone fell from between some breakers and killed him instantly. The "dog and chain" was not used and it is probable if it had been this accident would not have occurred; it was 30 yards away from the place at the time.

He was working at the loose end of his coal face getting off coal which liberated the edge of a pot hole and the stone fell upon and fractured his spine. The pot hole was 3 feet 6 inches diameter and 12 inches thick. Died on the 18th.

* All mines are coal mines unless otherwise specified.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

He was drawing a back prop when a fall of stone occurred, caught and killed him. He was using a hammer to knock the prop out and his "dog and chain was 60 yards away.

[ocr errors]

When getting coal a large pot hole was liberated and the stone fell without any warning on to him and fractured his spine.
Died on the 18th,

He had brought an empty tub into a long wall face and commenced to fill it when a very large fall occurred in the goaf and a piece of the stone slipped in towards the coal face and displaced a row of props and fatally injured the deceased man. Along with his mate he was getting coal and in doing so they disclosed a slip and as there was a weight break parallel to it and also another slip at right angles to it a stone fell, displaced five props, caught and killed him.

He went into the goaf beyond the back timber to relieve himself when a large fall of roof occurred and killed him.

When engaged setting a prop under the "clod," which was 18 inches thick, a heavy weight bump occurred and caused the clod to fall and a piece caught and seriously injured him. Died on the 20th.

He was building a gate pack, and taking the stone from the goaf edge near to it, when some "softs" and "bags," 2 feet 8 inches thick, suddenly fell over the props set to support it, and killed him.

He had taken out the sprags and dropped a length of 6 yards of coal holed 6 feet under, and filled three tubs. He was probably dressing off some coal from the face when the roof fell out to a weight break and broke off at the face, and he was caught and killed. He was alone at the time of the accident.

He was taking an empty tub into the face when a heavy weight bump took place and caused a fall of roof which caught and killed him.

While preparing to set a prop a "pot hole" fell out of the roof and killed him. He should have set the prop sooner as he had worked the coal away too far from the timber which was already set.

He was drawing back props from the goaf when the roof fell and displaced two rows, or 12 props, and he was killed on the spot.

He and his mate were taking top softs (coal) down in a slit. They cut along one side and also one end and then drew two of three props they had set under the coal, and he was knocking out the third when the coal fell upon and killed him.

He was wedging some coal down when a piece of stone fell from the roof and fatally injured him.

« PreviousContinue »