Page images
PDF
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[merged small][graphic][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][graphic]

SCHWEITZEB/S COOOATINA.

Anti-Dgsgaptic Cocoa or Chocolate Powder. _ Guaranteed Soluble Cocoa of the Finest Quality, with the excess oi (at extracted.

The Facult pronounce it “the most nutritious, perfectly digestible beverage for Breakfast, Luncheon, or Supper, and invaluable for Invalids and Children."

Highly commended by the entire Medical Press. _

Being without sugar, sp cs, or other admixture, it suits all palates, keeps for years in all climates, and is four limes the trengtb cf cocoa! TKICXIIID yet wnnnssn with starch, &c., and rrr REALITY cunrnn than such liixtures.

Made instantaneously with boiling water, a tesspoonful to a Breakfast Cup, costing less than s hulfgenny. Cooonnn A LA Vnunn is the most delicate, igestible, cheapest Manillu Chocolate, and may be taken when richer chocolate is prohibited.

In tins at ls. 6d., 3s., 5s. ed., &.c., by Chemists and

Grocers. '
Charities on Special Terms by the Sole Proprietor,

[ocr errors]
[graphic]

I AW FIRE INSURANCE OFFICE, 114,
Chancery-lane, London, Apqril ii IBM.-Notice
is Hereby Given. um the an UAL GENERAL
MEETING of the Bhareholdsrs of the Law Fire
Insurance Society will be held at the SOCl%i?"S
House. Chanccrv- one. on Tuesday.the 8rd day oi ay
next. to elect. Eight Directors in the room 0| the like
number oi Directors who go out by rotation; and
also to elect Four Auditors in the room of the like
number who retire; and for general purposes.
The Chair will be taken at one o'clock precisely.
The following Directors. going out hy rotation. are
eligible. and ofier themselves for re-election :-
Sp§ncerCroughtonWilde, J1-hn Moron Clsbon, Esq.
sci. Frederick Peake, Esq.
Arno d William White, Bartle John Laurie Frere,
Esq. Esq.

[graphic]

William Thomas Carlisle, Howard William Brough-
Esq. ton. Esq.
George Rooper, Esq.

[graphic]

The Auditors retiring are :E%ward Francis Blgg, Tanner Neve, sq s

. q. Octavius Lcele, Esq. Edward Hugh Whitehead. Esq. They are eligible, and ofier themselves for reelection.

[graphic]

By Order of the Board,
GEORGE WILLIAM BELL, Secretary.

THE MORTGAGE INSURANCE COR-
PORATION, LIMITED.
AMOUNT OF CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED, £710,000
Ofilces oi the Co oration-
Wmchcster House, Old lg-oad-street, E.C.
Rt. Hon. E. Pnarnsu. Boovsnnz, Chairman.
hlir SYDNEY H- Wsrssr-ow. Barn. Deputy-Chairman.

Policies are now being issued b this Corporation il15l'il1¢ M"l'l'»BI\8es of Freehol¥i and Leasehold Property. holders 0I_ Mortgage Debentures and aebenture Stock, against loss oi principal and in

Tbess Policies will be oi especial advantage to Trustees who may _be held responsible for losses consequent upon err Investments.

Mvrisasvrs msimnz with the Corporation will also be enabled to obtain Advances at the lowest possible rate oi interest.

The Corporation also grants Policies to Leaseholders insuring the return of the Amount invested at the expiration oi their leases or at an fixed

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

EDE AND son,
ROBE W ~ MAKERS,

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT.

To Her Msjwty. the Lord Chancellor. the Whole of
the Judicial Bench, Corporation of London, &c.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

SOLICITORS’ GOWNS.

Law Wigs and Gowns for Registrars, Town Clerks.
and Clerks of the Peace.

GORPORAIIOI ROBES. UNIVERSITY lllll MERRY OOWIIS
ESTABLISHED 1689.
V 94, CHANCERY LANE, LONQON.

LAW UNION FIRE and LIFE INSU-
RANCE COMPANY.
Esrmusnnn m ran Ynan 1854.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

which transects both Fire and Lite Insurance %u
ness.
Chief Oil1ce—
2i6, CHANGER} LANE. LONDON, W.C.
The Funds in hand and Capital Subscribed amount to
upwards of £1,900,000 sterling
Chair-man—J.ums CUDDON, Esq. oi the Middle
Temple Barrister-at-1'.-aw.

Deputy-Chairinan—Criaiu.ns PEMBEBTON, Esq. éLee

& Pembertons), Solicitor, 44, Lincoln’s-inn-ficl s.

The Directors invite attention to the New Form 0!
Life Policy, which is tree from all conditions.

Policies of Insurance granted against the contin-
gency oi Issue at moderate rates of Premium.

The Company AD VAYCES Money on Mortgage or Liie Interests and Reversions, whether absolute or contingent.

The Company also purchases Reversions.

Prospectuses, cogies of the Directors’ Report and Annua Balance S cet, and every information, sent post-free on application to

FRANK MCGEDY. Actuary and Secretary.

AOOIOENTS AT HOME ANO ABROAD

[ocr errors]

Tllll RAILWAY PASSllN(llliS' ASSURANOE OOMPANI
Q

[graphic]

64, COBNHILL, LONDON.

[ocr errors]

£ 2 , 3 5 0 , 0 0 0.
MODERATE PREMJUMS — Fsvownssnn Coxnrrioxs.
Prompt and Liberal Settlement of Claims.
CHA1sMAN—H.ARVIE M. FARQUHAR, ESQ.
West-End 0fico:——8, Grand Hotel Buildings, W.0
Head Office :—64, CORNHILL, LONDON. E.0.
WILLIAM J . VIAN. Secretary.
NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPAN Y
Established 1836.
Loxnoa: 1, Moorgats-street, E.C. Annals: 1,

Union-terrace. moons e rosos uses) =

[ocr errors]

Fire Premiums ... ... ... £577,000
LileP1-emiums ... ... 191,000
Interest... ...

[ocr errors]

LONDON GAZETTE (published by authority) and
LONDON and COUNTRY ADVERTISEMENT
0FFICE,—No. 117, CHANCEBY LANE, FLEET
STBIEET.

H LN BY OBEEN, Advertisement Agent,
begs to direct the attention of the Legal Profession

to the advantages oi his _lon_g experience of upwards of
forty years, in the special insertion of all pro for-ma
notices, &c., and hereby solicits their continued support.-

N.B. One copy of advertisement only required, and mg

strictest care and promptitnde assured. Oficial stamped

lO1‘mA for advertisement and file or “ London Gazette"

“Pt. Bv appointment.

Accumulued Funds

[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][graphic]

Solicitors. and the Trade. that their SeiLSOn tor the m disposal by Auction of Libraries of Books and Music, ;_ Eng-uvings, Paintingsfilonii other works conuectcil

wit. the Fine Arts, usical Instruments, and s

[graphic]

descriptions of Valiuible Property, will commence on October 17, and that their warehouses are open daily for the reception of oods consigned to them for sale. Messrs. P. & B. will hold several important Bales (luring t.he_Seoson, and will include small propartles in &pprOpl'l-BIB Sales, thus atiording the mines inutages to small ss_ to large consignments. 14‘il)l‘fll'lLE

and other properties cata ogued, arranged, mdlfallli gg Probate and Legacy Duty, or for Pubhc or rive e e. _

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

tion Railway Co. v. Brentford Union Assessment Committee .. 426 Rog v Judge cl th Chcl

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]

The Solicitors’ journal and Reporter.
LONDON, APRIL 30, I887.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

thTll‘E coiuiirrrs nominated by the Lord Chancellor to consider
b {report of Lord SisLi;oimn’s Committee on the distribution of
usiness in the Chancery Division and of the clerical staff, so far
‘gs the recommendations of that report have not been carried out
_ [B11198 of Court, will commence its labours next week, and will,
lib‘; ‘md°l5t00d, _8pply itself principally to the subject of the pos-
Z e amalgamation of the oflices of registrar, chief clerk, and
_ EH18 master. It is not yet announced which of the Chancery
101899 will he on the committee, but it is understood that a
ea? rfiglfltrar, a chief clerk, and a taxing master will be
members, that an eminent London solicitor will be joined as
'fiPl'9!8llt1!1gthe profession as well as the Ofiicial Solicitor, and that
1- KE!'1\'E1'u Mum MACKENZIE will act as secretary. ,

[ocr errors]

Ce 01‘ 1;! SUBJECT of the amalgamation of the work of the chan

ury ° @911, 811 argument in favour of some scheme for that gulélgfie gas been _based on the fact that the masters of the masters! lpncli Division act as registrars, chief clerks, and taxing point if llii when the matter is looked into, it appears that, in nmter° imi» the masters divide the work in such a way that each in com °“ Y performs one class of these duties, and that obviously It is iequenceof the convenience arising from division of labour. individlillillflteflfll what designation is applied to the particular ever “ha who does the work, but it is abundantly clear that whata divisitfmefof amalgamation may be devised, it must contemplate M15. TE‘) fllfi work of the offices between those on whom it finding alloflplternative seems to lie between the possibility of probability thf; :gl(!1i1l_S to be good H gll-round n men, as against the in each Ola“ of wgllgion of labour will Produce eflicient specialists

M ~

T of :01; urn Master of the Rolls used to say that “no amount the firszllg of the parties could confer jurisdiction.” On IL had onlayt °f_tl1e present sittings the Court of Appeal No. Lords Justiiieswijo lnteflocutory appeals in the days’ paper, which Lord Justice B(;1v1;1'0N and LInnLsii disposed of. In the absence of pg]-ties’); to he :1‘, they then proceeded, “ by consent of the

heard to say that the order then made was bad for want of jurisdiction, but it must be observed that the judges of the Court of Appeal owe it to themselves and to suitors not to risk the raising of such ii question. It might unfortunately happen that the two judges would be unable to agree, and in that case a rehearing before three judges would be the expensive right left to the parties.

[ocr errors]

Ir is unnnasroon that the entertainments proposed to be m'ven by the Incorporated Law Society in June next have now assumed very large proportions. Eleven hundred country members have, it appears, accepted the invitation of their London brethren to take part in the festivities, which will comprise a dinner on the 4th of June in the Central Hall of the Royal Courts of Justice, and probably a second dinner on the 6th of J une in the same place; a ball on the 7th of June at the Society's building, and theatrical representations on the 9th of June at the Lyceum, the St. J'ames’s, and the Court Theatres. The expediency of giving two dinners may be questioned, but it seems that it cannot be helped, as it would be impossible to accommodate, on the same evening, the eleven hundred coimtry members and the five hundred London members who have guaranteed the expenses, as well as the large number of distingished guests who are to be invited. There are many precedents (and lawyers would be nowhere without them) for a series of dinners. The feasts given on the creation of new serjeants often extended over a week, as did also great feasts given by the Inns of Court on other important occasions. The committee to whom the arrangements have been entrusted are working very energetically, and there is good reason to hope that the success of the entertainments will be equal to their magnitude.

[graphic]

Tin: DEBATE in the House of Lords on the second reading of the Land Transfer Bill did not afford much valuable criticism on the general scheme of that measure. Lord Snniioiiim objected to the gradual development of the branch district registries—a feature of the Bill which, even apart from financial considerations, appears to us to be particularly prudent. Let the new system be tested by two or three years’ working in one district ; its results will be ascertained, and its defects will come to light, and opportunity will be afforded for making any changes that may be required before its operation is extended. Few people seem to have observed that under T-he B111 compulsion does not necessarily follow the establishment of _a district. Clause 2 provides that “Her Majesty may, by Order in Council, from time to time declare, as respects any land transfer district, that, on and after a day specified in the order, the registration of the transfer of land in the district is to be compulsory." It may possibly be that the intention is to give the system_a trial in the first instance without compulsion, and, whether this is so or not, it seems to us that it might be prudent to adopt that course. Lord HERSCHELL undoubtedly put his finger on a serious defect in the measure when he said that the Bill had to be read with the Act of 1875 before it could be understood. The defect is the more serious inasmuch as that Act is very far from being a good SpG0111‘.8’l1 of drafting. It is satisfactory to find from the Lord Chancellor s speech that, if the Bill passes, a Consolidation Bill will be immediately introduced.

[graphic][merged small]
[graphic]

'1' 1181 appeals, but it is open to doubt whether

[ocr errors]

present Land Registry Office Rules the assistance of a solicitor is

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

made indispensable in the great majority of transactions. Every instrument transferring (26—this and the following numbers refer to the present Rules) or charging (20) registered land, or transferring a registered charge (21), or negativing the usual mutual covenants on a transfer of a registered lease (24), or consenting to registration of conditions restricting the use of registered land (31), or to the notification of a grant of an easement (32), must be attested by a solicitor and verified by his declaration identifying the registered owner who executes it (46) ; further, every application for registration (6, 7), or for the entry of notice of cessation of a charge (22), of an estate in dower or by the ourtesy (26), of a lease or agreement for a lease (28), or of a grant of an easement (32); every consent of a cautioner (16), or withdrawal or modification of a restriction (18), must be verified by a solicitor’s declaration (46). It remains to be seen whether the Legislature is prepared to dispense with the protection against forgery and personation which the solicitor’s verification affords. But, in any case, solicitors are entitled to some effectual provision that where agents are employed they shall in all cases he solicitors only. We agree with a correspondent, who has addressed the Council of the Incorporated Law Society on this subject, that it is essential to urge the insertion eitherin the Bill or Rules of a stringent provision on this subject. Possibly the following (which is taken from the South Australian Statutes, 1878, No. 128, s. 66) might serve as a groundwork for the proposed provision :—“ N 0 person other than a solicitor . . . shall be entitled to sue for or receive any fees, costs, or charges, or to have any right to set off any such fees, costs, or charges in any action brought against such person for work and labour done or money expended in reference to applications, transfers, or instruments relating to land under the provisions of this Act; or to have any lien or right to retain any deed, paper, or writing which shall have come into his possession in reference to any such proceedings.”

Ir win. an sans from a letter which we print in another column that Mr. DANIEL, Q.C., objects to our suggestion last week that his statement--that “no man ever signs his name twice exactly alike: if two signatures are produced exactly alike one of them is imitated ”—was, perhaps, too broadly expressed. He thinks it was not stated strongly enough, and he gives theoretical reasons of much weight in support of his view, and further adduces practical illustrations from his signatures of his own name. He also asks us to try the experiment for ourselves, and see whether the signatures arc identical. That would hardly be afair instance, both because the signatures, being made with the knowledge that they were to be compared, would be more careful than signatures under other circumstances, and also because it happens that the writer of the observations to which Mr. DAl\'IEL refers has long taken considerable interest in autographs, and some years ago adopted a form of signature which from constant repetition has become probably rather unusually uniform. But we have compared the signatures, contained in a series of letters at different dates, of one of the most careful and accurate of solicitors. The firm name, being somewhat long and by no means easy to write, leaves considerable room _for variations. On comparing the signatures (evidently n_iade_in a hurry in the usual course of the after-fouro clock-routine signature of a series of ofiice letters) we find a surprising _uniformity in the “spacing” of the words and the size, inclination,_and formation of the letters. It is only when you conic Ito minutely examine the signatures that you find slight variations, nearly always in the last letter of one of the names. There are _no two signatures precisely alike. Then we took a series of_ signatures of a well-known high ofiicial, who writes 1111 admirably clear,_ strong, and regular hand, and is apparently in the enviable position of never being obliged to sign his name in a hurry. Here the differences in the format1°n °f_1ette" in the signatures were most trivial but there

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]

Ir was i-inacrnn by 1 & 2 Vict. c. 110, s. 17, that every judgment debt should carry interest at the rate of four per cent. from the time of entering up the ndgment, and that such interest might be levied under a writ of execution on the judgment. Some years later county courts were established by 9 & 10 Vict. o. 95, and the question must have been often raised whether the judgments pronounced in them came within the above provision. There seems, however, to have been no decision on the subject until this week, when it has been settled by The Queen v. The Judge of flu Olwlmsfbrd County Court and Clarke that county court judgments do not carry interest. They derive their force from section 94 of the last mentioned act, which provides that a writ of fi. fa. may issue for the sum of money ordered to be paid by the judge, and for the costs of the execution. The Master of the Rolls pointed out that the omission of any mention of interest in this section, when it had been so recently awarded to ordinary judgments, clearly showed that the omission was intentional on the part of the Legislature. It is possible, however, that such intention was constructive merely and not actual, for in this respect there does not seem to be any sound distinction between the two classes of judgments. But upon other grounds the differences between them are so great as to make it impossible to apply legislation designed originally for the one to the other also. These are very clearly stated in llerkaley v. Elderkia (1 W. R. 305, 1 E. dc B. 805). There an action was brought in the (-),ueen’s Bench upon a county court judgment, and the judges were unanimous that it did not lie. They pointed out the peculiarities in executions under it, both as against the property and the person of the debtor. The Legislature had provided a new right and a new remedy, and its intention, as Lord CAMPBELL, C.J., stated, was to confine the remedy to that specifically provided by the Act. This makes no mention of interest, and the omission, whether really intentional or no, cannot be cured by reference to the earlier Act dealing with ordinary judgments.

In A c.\ss' of Moaele v. The Victoria Rubber Co.,_wh_ich lulled for eight days before git. Justice Cmrrr, his lordship, in delivering judgment, rr. ade some observations respecting the advantage of having shorthand writers’ notes printed from day to day. Tl_18 action was one to try the validity of a patent for improvements 111 the manufacture of ornamental designs on waterproof fabrics, and during the trial there was a detailed examination in court of exhibits by means of the microscope. Mr. Justice Ciiirrr observed that the trial had bee: greatly facilitated by the use of shorthind writers’ notes printed HUH1 day to day during the course of the trial.

Many of our readers will be glad to hear that the _8-mole‘ “Concerning Searches," which recently appeared in this journal, are about to be re-published by Messrs. Maxwell 8: Son with couPl(l9l‘8.lJl8 additions, and in a revised form, adapted to the P‘1T5e of ready rcference in chambers or offices. It is believed that the work will supply a widely felt want in legal literature.

At the Guildhall Police Court on the 21st inst. Henry Ouslow Curling116, Camberwell-road, was summoned at the instance of the Iucorporflwd Law Society for having unlawfully acted as a solicitor on two seP"“te occasions, he not being a solicitor at the time. Mr. O. O. H\1mPl“'e5:' who appeared in support of the summons, stated that in June last L1’ defendant appeared in an action in the Lord Mayor’s Court 85811199 Richmond for the recovery of £5, money lent. He obtained J‘{dKme1,‘)' and it was arranged that £2 should be paid down and the remainder é instalments. The payments were not kept up, and the defendant WI‘? H to Mr. Richmond. stating that he would deliver his oill of costs amounting to £5 ls. The bill of costs was delivered for taxation to the Y9F"““0g the Lord Mayor‘s Court, and the amount was reduced to £4 10s. d1hWithout notice an execution was put into Mr. Richmond's liollfiei ‘"1 ° had to pay out £8 7s. 4d., although the amount due was only 132- It W}? subsequently discovered that the defendant had sued in person; $11“ ‘ had charged professional costs, although he was not in practice; UR?" this discovery the £4 10s. costs were reviewed and reduced 1_f>9- ‘ Purcell, for the defence, contended that in this instance no l11Jl11'Y la’ been done to the public. His client had been in practice tW6"'7' . W years ago, and he was not aware that lie was doing any Wl'0l‘8 "1 chflgmg professional costs. Alderman de Keyser held that it was a mos]? fl'mB"°I£e thing for persons to practise professionally who were not solicitorsshould impose a fine in each case of 10s. with two guineas cos“, mud! a was of as 2s.—.Times. ’

[graphic]
« PreviousContinue »