Margaret Junkin Preston, Poet of the Confederacy: A Literary Life

Front Cover
Univ of South Carolina Press, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 137 pages
Though her poetry and short stories had appeared in several national magazines and her only novel, Silverwood (1856), had been published anonymously prior to her marriage, Preston gave up her writing career in exchange for household duties. But with the onset of war, Preston again took to wielding her pen, this time to espouse the Southern cause through a series of Confederate nationalist verses. The deaths of Stonewall Jackson and her stepson, her husband's dangerous military service, and the invasion of her home by Union troops all solidified for Preston the high personal cost of war and compounded her belief in the justice of the Confederate cause. Her most notable piece from this period is a long narrative poem, Beechenbrook: A Rhymeof the War, published in Richmond in 1865.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter
7
Chapter Three
22
Chapter Four
39
Chapter
59
Chapter Seven
74
Chapter Eight
87
Conclusion
99
Select Bibliography
121
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information