From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 262 - The longer I live, the more I am certain that the great difference between men, between the feeble and the powerful, the great and the insignificant, is energy — invincible determination ; a purpose once fixed and then death or victory. That quality will do anything that can be done in this world, and no talents, no circumstances, no opportunities, will make a two-legged creature a man without it.
Page 151 - THIS INDENTURE, made this day of , in the year One thousand, nine hundred and , between of , the party of the first part...
Page 151 - Part further covenants and agrees to merchandise such wheat in foreign ports , it being understood and agreed between the Party of the First Part and the Party of the Second Part...
Page 239 - Nor only through the lenient air this change, Delicious, breathes; the penetrative sun, His force deep-darting to the dark retreat Of vegetation, sets the steaming Power At large, to wander o'er the verdant earth, In various hues; but chiefly thee, gay green! Thou smiling Nature's universal robe! United light and shade ! where the sight dwells With growing strength, and ever-new delight.
Page 151 - ... the party of the first part shall pay to the party of the second part...
Page 151 - Arts," and with a view to promote the usefulness of said institution; and in consideration of the agreements and contracts of the party of the second part, hereinafter contained, do hereby covenant and agree to locate, and do locate and establish the said Institution at Hanover, in this State, in connection with Dartmouth College. This location and agreement, between the parties, being subject to be terminated, upon a notice of one year, given by either party, at any time after fourteen years from...
Page 152 - It is further agreed by the party of the second part, that neither he nor his legal representatives will underlet said premises, or any part thereof, or assign this lease...
Page 207 - The hereditary propensities of the offspring of Norwegian ponies," says Mr. TA Knight, in a paper read before the Royal Society in 1837, "whether full or half bred, are very singular. Their ancestors have been in the habit of obeying the voice of their riders, and not the bridle, and the horsebreakers complain that it is impossible to produce this last habit in the young colts ; they are notwithstanding exceedingly docile and obedient when they understand the commands of their master.
Page 304 - Don't expect them to love your old hill-sides when you have never give them anything there but hard, dull work. Don't expect your daughters will love the old homestead, when they have got to leave it to learn the first lesson in culture or innocent pleasure. Make your home cheerful and you will make it a happy one. Instead of making the boy hoe all day on the hill-side for you, let him hoe a half day there occasionally for himself. You have land enough. Plow up an acre for the boy, and let him have...
Page 206 - Although exposed for centuries to the modifying influences of diverse climates, to association with peoples of widely differing customs and habits, they never merge their peculiarities in those of any people with whom they dwell, but continue distinct. They retain the same features, the same figures, the same manners, customs and habits. The Jew in Poland, in Austria, in London, or in New York, is the same ; and the money-changers of the Temple at Jerusalem in the time of our Lord may be seen today...

Bibliographic information