Page images
PDF
EPUB

THE SEASONS; AND THE SUN'S PATH THROUGH THE ZODIAC. Sun enteri,

Mean Local Time.
Sign. Con. Date,
H.M.

D. H.M.
Dec. 22, 11 56 a.m., 1910. Winter begins and lasts 89 0 42 8. of Equator.
Jan. 20, 8 27 a.m., 1911.
Feb. 19, 1 4 a.m., 1911.
Mch. 21, 7 38 p.m., 1911. Spring begins and lasts 92 19 42 N. of Equator.
Apr. 21, 0 20 a.m., 1911.
May 21, 9 4 a.m., 1911.
June 22, 8 20 a.m., 1911. Summer begins and lasts 93 14 42 N. of Equator.
July 23, 7 12 p.m., 1911.
Aug. 24, 2 22 a.m., 1911.
Sept. 23, 11 2 p.m., 1911. Autumr. begins and lasts 89 18 35 S. of Equator.
Oct. 24, 7 38 a.m., 1911.
Nov. 23. 4 40 a.m., 1911.
Dec, 22, 5 37 p.m., 1911. Winter begins.

Tropical year—365 5 41
D. H. M.

D. H. M.
89 0 42

92 19 42 89 18 35

93 14 42

[ocr errors]

178

19 17 South of the Equator.

Subtract

186 10
178 19

24 North of the Equator.
17

The sun is 7 15 7 longer north of the Equator than south of it. owing to the slower motion of the earth (apparent motion of the sun) at, and near aphellon.

THE PLANETS IN 1911. MERCURY (8) will be brightest:

(a) As an EVENING STAR April 1-10 and Dec. 4-10, setting about lh. 15m. after the Sun, being at greatest angular distance east of the Sun April 14 (19°) and

Dec. 7 (21). At the April date he will be in #, directly s. of Alpha Mercury. Arietis and the line of stars in the horn of the Ram, and in Dec. in f.

near the end of the handle of the Milkmaid's Dipper. On Apr. 10 h wili be 4. S. of , and on Sept. 24 § will be 6° N. of .

(b) As a MORNING STAR Feb. 1-5 and Sept. 23-30, rising about lh. 15m. be fore the Sun, being at greatest angular distance west of the Sun Feb. 2 (25°) and Sept. 25 (18%). When brightest in Feb. the Milkmaid's Dipper in I will be about 10° W. of him, and in Sept. the Sickle in n will be about 15° W. of him. The absence of the Moon in the Feb. and Sept. periods will render those dates still more favorable.

VENUS (9), the "Queen of Beauty," whose sign is a looking glass, will be a most attractive celestial object nearly all of the year. Twice she will be at her very

brightest: first, Aug. 8-12, as an EVENING STAR, and again after passing Venus. between the earth and sun (Inferior conjunction) as a MORNING STAR,

Oct. 21-25. See Table of the Planets and Chart of Visibility of the Planets. Venus not only attains a greater degree of brilliancy than any of the others, but at such times and for about a month before and after she will show a large crescent phase like the Moon between new and the quarters. At the Oct. date she will shine with unusual splendor in the absence of the Moon and will cast a distinct shadow. While the annexed figure shows all the various phases through which the planet passes, the telescope shows the boundaries away from the sun to be irregular. The light will blend off and the margins will be more or less jagged, owing to the refraction of the sunlight in the planet's atmosphere and the irregularities of her surface, mountains, etc. The discovery of these phases was the work of the first

telescope in the hands of Galileo, though TOWARDS THE SUN

their existence was believed earlier. D N

A.-Fifteen days before superior conPHASES

junction or June 20, 1912.

B.-At greatest elongation West, OF

Nov. 26, 1911.

C.-When brightest as a morning star Oct. 21-25, 1911.

D. Just after inferior conjunction or Sept. 20, 1911.

E.-Fifteen days after superior conVENUS

junction, July 20, 1912. G

F.-At greatest elongation East, July S

7, 1911. H

When brightest as an evening star, AS SEEN IN THE MORN AS SEEN IN THE EVF Aug. 8-12, 1911. W OF SUN

H. Just before inferior conjunction,

Sept. 10, 1911. In following the course of the planets the reader will do well to use the other aids in this Almanac-Chart of the Heavens," "Table of the Rising. Southing and Setting of the Planets," etc. Locate the planets in the zodiac on the chart and then follow them in their course past the stars, noting when they are in conjunction with the Moon, stars or other planets.

At the beginning of the year will be found 5° N. of Milkmaid's Dipper in I;

[ocr errors]

VENUS

USTANINO SANTO

[ocr errors]

QOD

GATEST

Jan. 11 just 8, of the brightest star in and on the boundary between 1 and 1 ; o 3 Feb. 1, 83° 37' N.; Feb. 8 in 10 s. of them on the equator of the heavens: Feb. 26 on the prime meridian of the heavens 15° s. of the square of Pegasus; Uch 2.9 2 20 N.; enters * Mch. 26-29; Apr. 1, D. 14 N. and occulted; Apr. 15, 5 S. of the Pleiades; Apr. 26, 7° N. of Aldebaran, the lucida of the Hyades, May 1, o D o 1° 28' S.; May 7 in eastern 8 and due N. of Orion's Belt 24°; May 15 in line northward with the bright stars in the feet of the twins (II) and the brightest star of the heavens (Sirius) due south of her about 40°. Note that an immense diamond is formed by Venus on the N., Sirius on the s., Betelgeuse on the W. and Procyon on the E-a most striking figure in the evening skies west of the meridian; May 29-30 between Castor and Pollux in on the north and Procyon on the s., but nearest the former and 3° N. of W: June 12-13 in son northern edge of the group of dim stars called Præsepe; June 29, ó D, 9 30° 40'-; July 5-6 less than 1° N. of Regulus in the end of the handle of the Sickle; Brightest Aug. 8-12, when about 150 E. of Regulus, near the middle 22, where she soon becomes stationary with respect to the stars and then begins to move back westward or retrogrades. She may be seen in the daytime in July and Aug. by knowing just where to look for her; becomes invisible early, in Sept., being at inferior conjunction Sept 15. When next seen she will appear in the east in the morning, west of the Sun; ó 8. Sept. 24, being 10° s. of 8; Stationary again early in Oct. in eastern 22; Occulted by 3 Nov. 16; advances past the stars of m. passing about 4° N, of Spica the last of Nov. and through the square of the last of Dec.

MARS (d) will be brightest, as an EVENING STAR Nov. 24-25, being a MORNING STAR until Aug. 8 and afterward an Evening Star to the end of the year. At the beginning of the year he will

be in m, low in the East at dawn and about Mars. 5° N. of Antares; Jan. 26; Feb. 1, 3° N. of the Milkmaid's Dipper in 1:

Ó ) Feb. 24, Mch. 11; Mch. 15 in B about 5° S. of the bright stars in the head of the Goat, 8 Mch. 25; last of Apr. in 10° s. of the hio Apr. 23 and May 22; June 1 on first meridian of the heavens; • 25th. On the 15th of July he will be about 10° S. of the bright stars in P; Aug. 8 at western and Ó h Aug. 16; last of Aug. 8° S. of Pleiades; last of Sept. close to and N. of the Hyades. Stationary middle of Oct. in 8; retrogrades very slowly back to the Pleiades Dec. 1, being at 8 Nov. 26, when he will rise at sunset, pass the meridian at midnight and set at sunrise, being then and for some time before and after that date an all night star. Several new canals were discovered on Mars in 1909. Snowstorms were also observed.

JUPITER (74) will be at 8 Apr. 30, when he will be brightest and an evening and an all night star. Inasmuch as 2 requires 12 of our years in which to make a

revolution about the Sun and pass all the stars of the zodiac, his moveJupiter, ment from time to time will be very slight as compared to that of the plan

ets whose orbits are inferior to his, as he traverses only one sign in a vear. He is still in , and during the first days of Feb. he will be very close (1° N.) to the brightest star in that constellation-Alpha Libræ, situated on the Ecliptic and being the S. W. star of the square of Libra. The last of Nov. he will pass out of and E. of the square, and at the close of the year be about 8° E. of its easternmost star. See tables of Occultations, Conjunctions, etc. Of the seven satellites known to belong to Jupiter only four can be easily seen by the aid of small glasses, These satellites do not undergo the same changes in brilliancy that our moon does owing to the fact that 2 is a semi-sun and his moons are supplied, in part, by himself, while our moon borrows her entire supply from the Sun.-See the following tables.

SATURN (h) will be brightest Nov. 9 as an Evening and all night star, and will be very bright for a considerable time before and after that time. Inasmuch as

two and one-half years are required for him to pass throuh one sign or Satur. constellation, it is evident we can scarcely detect any change in position

with respect to the stars from month to month. He is in P. of his large lamily of satellites-ten in all--only one (Titan) is ordinarily visible with a 3-inch telescope, but the wonderful ring system is always visible in such an instrument, except when the earth is crossing their plane every 15 years. Each year, however, the Farth attains a maximum elevation above their plane and at such times the ring system is best observed. This occurs in Aug. about the time of the western quadmature of h. From Aug. on he will be only a few degrees west of the Pleiades and Hyades.

URANUS ( or H) will be brightest July 20 and will not be near any bright or conspicuous star. Perhaps the best time for an amateur to locate this planet will be

at its close conjunction with Mch. 11, when & will be seen for several Uranus. days only one-third of a degree (or about one-half the moon's apparent

diameter) N. of d. To see this planet with the unaided eye is a test of good eyesight.

NEPTUNE (9), the outermost known of our planetary family, will be brightest Jan. 11, in I, a few degrees S. of Castor and Pollux. It is stated that a good

opera or Aeld glass will show V at the time of 8, or when brightest, pro1 Neptune. vided one knows just where to look. Look for it on a line from Castor

to Procyon and nearly midway between those stars, with a fine cluster of stars just to the west.

ECLIPSES, 1911. There will be two eclipses this year and both of the Sun, as must always be the case when only two occur. They are as follows:

I. Total, April 28. Partially visible in the United States as a small partial wclipse on the Sun's southern limb. The Sun will set more or less eclipsed east of a line from near Pittsburg. Pa., to near Matagorda Bay, Texas. Washington, D. C., is

*St.

on the northern Atlantic boundary of the area of visibility. No part of the eclipse will be visible north of a line from Portland, Ore., through Milwaukee and Pittsburg to Wash., D. C. Therefore the eclipse will be very small in the Western and Middle States west of the above mentioned line from Pittsburg to Matagorda Bay, Texas, being largest in the extreme Southwest. More exactly visible as follows:

Begins. Ends.

Size.

Correction for
H.M.
H.M.
Digits.

Stand. Time. Chicago

6.10 p. m.
6:15 p. m.
0.5

--10m. Centl. * Washington, D. C. Charles.on, S. C.

6:14 p. m.

sets ec'd 2.0 1 at sunset +20m. Eastn. St. Louis, Mo....

5:43 p. m. 6:23 p. m.

1.5

+ im. Centl. Paul.. * Minneapolis New Orleans.

5:22 p. m.

sets ec'd 2.0 D at sunset 0 Centl. San Diego.

3:11 p. m.
4:46 p. m. 4.0

-11m. Pac. San Francisco.

2:52 p. m. 4:15 p. m.

3.0

+10m. Pac. Los Angeles.. 3: 8 p. m. 4:29 p. m. 3.9

6m. Pac. Birmingham, Ala.

5:39 p. m.

sets ec'd 2.8 D at sunset -13m. Centi. Raleigh, N. C..

6:23 p. m. 1 sets ec'd 1.3 1 at sunset +15m. Eastn. Jacksonville. Fla.

6: 6 p. m.

O sets ec'd 3.1 1 at sunset -33m. Centl. Little Rock, Ark.

5:34 p. m.
at sunset 3.0

te 9m, Centl. Jackson, Miss..

5:27 p. m.
o sets ec'a 2.0

+ 1m. Centl. Chattanooga, Tenn.

5:22 p. m.

sets ec'a

1.7 D at sunset -19m. Centl. Savannah, Ga.

6: 7 p. m. sets ec'd 3.0 I at sunset --36m. Centl. Louisville, Ky..

5:56 p. m.

sets ec'd 0.9 D at sunset -18m. Centl. *Richmond, Va...

* Contact of limbs at sunset. I-Indicates that the eclipse will be increasing at sunset. D—Indicates that the eclipse will be decreasing at sunset.

NORTH

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

II. Annular, October 22, Invisible on the Western Continent. Visible in the Southwestern Pacific and Asia. The path of the an

nular phase passes through New SUN

Guinea, the Southern Philippines and Southern China to the Sea of Aral.

The figure shows the Sun with 4

1, 2, 3 and 4 digits eclipsed on its

southern limit.
3
2

1 SITUATION OF THE PLANETS FOR THE SUNDAYS; ALSO MOON'S POSITION FOR THE YEAR.

គឺ
Planet.
Venus. 11 5 5 H

78 40
622 32 122

522 3 m Mars 8 m 12 1

12 I
96 14 ***

10 8 88 12 8 10 P 19Jupiter.... 15 | 19 16 - 21

17 A

15 2 | 19 – 17 Saturn 22 P 26 P ( 26 P | 23 28 P 25 p

27 p 24 P | 22 P 26 T 24 P Uranus 29 I

30 f

31 1

lan.

Tune

July

[ocr errors]

2 P

13 T

... 30

29 I

Moon.

Jan. 2

18

15

3 Perigee

12 9
6 2-30 28

24 21 17 12 8 6 Apogee

24 21 21 18 15 11 8 5 2--29 27 24 21 Highest

13 9 8 5 229 26 22 19 18 12 9 64 Lowest 26 23 22 18 16 12* 9 6

27 23 21 at 23 19

12 8

5 1--28 25 22 18 15 at

10 6
5 1-29 26 22

20

16 12 9 5 13-30 on Equator. 6--19:3--163-15 12-26 --2315--20:3-17 113-269--23:6-19/3--161--13

--30
--301

--28 *Moon lowest of the year, June 11. Moon highest of the year, Dec. 5. See the following note. Explanation of Signs.-P Aries. 8 Taurus.

D Gemini. C Cancer. N Leo. m Virgo. A Libra. m Scorpio, I Sagittarius. Capricornus. - Aquarius. *

Pisces. The place indicated for the planets is for the first, second, third, fourth and fifth Sundays of each month, in the order of the planets.

This

Note The Moon will "run high" from "Lowest" to "Highest," and "run low" from "Highest" to "Lowest." The Full Moon will be highest of the year at meridian passage December 16 and lowest June 22. She will begin to run lower March 21 and decrease in altitude until June 22. and then increase ("run higher") until December 21, after which she will gradually get lower until June 22. because the Full Moon must always be on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, and hence when the Sun is lowest in declination the Moon must be highest, and when the Sun is highest the Moon must be lowest. The difference between extremes being 57° or (23%1⁄2°+5°)x2, 5° being the inclination of the orbit of the Moon to the ecliptic.

MERIDIAN PASSAGE, RISING AND SETTING OF THE PLANETS.
Mean local time. All P. M. figures are in black type.

VENUS 9.

MARS ♂.

JUPITER 2.

Months

January. January. January. February. February.

February.

Xarch..

March.
March.

April.

April..

April.

May.

May.

May.

June

June.

June.

Days

Meridian

1

041

5 44 5 15 11 0 56 6 5 5 39 21 1 8 625 6 3 1 19 647 127 7 6 1 33

6 305

1 11 21

6 56

1

11

724 7 15 1 38 7 38 7 38 143 756 8 15 21 1 49 8 13 8 26 11 57 8 33 851 11 2 5 8 51 9 13 21 2 15 9 10 9 37 1 2 27 9-28 9 59 239 9 44 10 16 21 2 50 9 53'10 25

11

July.

Jaly.

July August August.

1 3 110 110 31 11 3 9 10 110 28 21 3 12 9 5610 17 1 3 13 9 48 10 5 11 3 9 9 31 9 42 21 3 18 16 9 24 1 2 45 8 49 851 11 2 24 8 19 8 17 21 1 52 7 32 7 37 113 Invisible

grust September. September. 11 0 5 Info! O September. 21 11 5 Rises 110 14 4 13 4 13 11 9 37 3 32 3 31 21 9 14 3 8 3 5 1 8 58 2 55 2 53 11 850 250 250 21 8 47 253 18 46 3 1 11 8 48 3 11 21 8 52 3 23 3 39 31 8 58 3 36 358

October.. October.. October. November. November. November.

258)

3 8

1 December. December. Benen her. December.. 15th.

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

Sets

HMH MIH M

Meridian

In

--Rises

H MH MIH M

[blocks in formation]

Rises

9 46 4 38 5 5

434

5 3
457
4.50

H MIH MIH M 7.50 221 238 7 16 1 48 2 6 642 1 16 1 32 6 3038 055 5.26 0 1 018 4 49 11 29'11 46 4 18 10 58'11 15 3 38 10 17 10 34 2579 36 953) 8 31 3 14 2 10 8 48 9 5 8 22 3 0 127 8 5 8 25 8 12 2 44 0 43 719 7 36 8 1 2 27 11 551 Sets750 2 9 2 19 11 10 4 43 4 28 738) 151 157 10 26 4 13 46 7 24 1 29 1 32 9 39 3 14 3 0 7 11 1 1 1 1 10 857 233 2 19 6.59 0.52 0.49) 8 15 151 137 6 45 0 30 0.23 7 35 1 11 057 631 0 11 0 1 656 0 321 0 18) 6 17 11 53/11 41 6 19 11 50'11 36 6 011 3111 16 5 38 11 910 54 5 45 11 12 10 56 5 310 33 10 18 5 28 10 5110 30 4 29 9 58 9 5 7 10 26 10 4 351 919 9 2 44610 2 9 39 3 18 8 44 8 24 4 22 9 36 9 12 2 45 8 9 7 32 3 54 9 7 8 42 2 11 7 37 7 19 3 21 8 32 8 5 142 7 4 6 45 243 751 727 1 11 6 31 611 154 7 6 638 0 38 Invisible 614 547 0 7618th Sets 11 37 Rises 6 5 631 11 7 5 53 6 16 5 13 5 39 10 36 5 23 5 48 424 4 50 10 6 454 5 16 3 43 4 9: 9 35 4 24 4 49

[blocks in formation]

SATURN h.

[blocks in formation]

-Sets

HMH MH M

7 12 137 1 47 6 33 058 18 5 55 0 17 0 27 5 13 11 35 11 46 4 36 10 59 11 10 4 110 24/10 36 3319 5510 7 2 55 920 9:32 220 8 46 9 5 142 8 9 822 1 7 7 36 7 50 033 Invisible 11 5916 1st 11 24-Rises10 501 453 4 38 10 12 3 39 3 23 937 3 3 2 46 9 2 2 28 2 11 8 27 152 135 7511 151 078 7 15 039 0.21 634 0 211 44 557 11 24 11 6 5 22 10 49 10 31 435 10 3 9 45 3 56 923 9 5 3 16 844 826 235 8.3 7 45 154 722 7 5 112 6 41 624 5 45 5 34 Sets534 5.50 4 51 58 4 9 4 25 3 28 344 2 45 3 1

0 25 11 39

3 23

1 3
0 8

11 7
10 16
9 29
8 48

MORNING STARS (W. OF SUN.) Mercury-See "Planets Brightest." Venus, until Sept. 14.

Mars, until Aug. 8.

Jupiter, until Feb. 3 and after Nov. 18.
Saturn, from May 1 to Aug. 13.

9 38

9 29

4 26

9 20

4 19

9 12

4 11

4 42

9 4
858

4 1
354
3 42

4 31
4 231
4 9
355

8 50

8 42

3 30

3 36)
3 19

3 0
2 40

10 56
10 14
9 32
851
8 10

EVENING STARS (E. OF SUN.)
Mercury-See "Planets Brightest."
Venus, after Sept. 14.

Mars, after Aug. 8.

Jupiter, from Feb. 3 to Nov. 18.
Saturn, until May 1 and after Aug. 13.

PLANETS BRIGHTEST

OR BEST SEEN.

Mercury (), Feb. 1-5 and Sept. 23-30, as a Morning Star, rising about 1. 15m. before the Sun; also Apr. 1-10 and Dec. 4-10, as an Evening Star, setting 1h. 15m. after the Sun. Venus (9), Aug. 8-12 as an Eve. Star and Oct. 21-25

a Morn. Star. Mars (), Nov. 24-25, all night. Jupiter (2), Apr. 30, all night. Saturn (b), Nov. 9. all night. Uranus ( or H), July 20, all night, Neptune (V), Jan. 11, all night.

Planet.

and

and

and

♂ and and

Jan. 11..

Jan.

16. Jan. 20. Feb. 3..

Apr. 30.

May 1.. July 21.. July 29.

Day.

Jan. 9
Jan. 23
Jan. 26
Jan. 31
Feb. 5
Feb. 19
Feb. 24
Mch. 2
Mch. 4
Mch. 18 |
Mch. 25
Apr. 1
Apr. 1
Apr. 14
Apr. 23
Apr. 28
May 1
May 11
May 22
May 26
May 30
June 7
June 20
June 23
June 29
July 5

PLANETARY CONJUNCTIONS.

WITH THE MOON.
Washington mean time.

H.M.

0: 4 a.m. 0:40 a.m. 5:26 p.m. 9:55 a.m. 7:35 a.m. 1: 6 p.m. 6:32 p.m. 0:49 p.m. 5:14 p.m. 9: 0 p.m. 6:55 p.m. 6: 6 a.m. 0:37 p.m. 11:58 p.m. 8: 2 p.m. 9:38 p.m. 8: 2 a.m. 11:44 p.m. 8:46 p.m. 2: 7 p.m. 11:41 p.m. 11:58 p.m. 7:86 p.m. 5:30 a.m. 11:59 a.m. 4:13 a.m.

4

5

Distance
Apart.

OCCULTATIONS

h

1° 4' S.
0° 57' N.
2° 59' N.
3° 37' N.
1° 18' S.
1° 31' N.
3° 35' N. O
2° 20′ N. 2
1° 39' S. h
1° 47' N.8
4° 15' N.8
1° 58' S.
0° 14' N.
1° 41' N.
3° 46' N.
2° 17' S. 2
1° 29' S. h
1° 19' N.
2° 19' N.9
2° 38' S. 4
2o 35' S. h
1° 0' N.
0° 12' N. 9
3° 3' S. 2
3° 40' S.
0° 58' N.

ь
8.

Jan.

Jan.

Jan.

50° 41' S.

Mch. 110° 23′ S.
Mch. 29

2° 25′ N.

1° 58' N.
2° 50' N.

2 Note. The "Distance Apart" is between centres as seen from the centre of the earth. It should be borne in mind that bodies are not always nearest when in conjunction (6), but the above data will enable the absolute identification of the planets on or NEAR the dates given and when the conjunction occurs in the daytime. The planets, and are ignored in this connection, as usually the Moon's overpowering light will render the last two invisible and generally will be too near the Sun to be seen.

WITH OTHER PLANETS.

PLANETARY

OF

Planet.

W.

D.

Day.

July 19
July 20
July 25

Aug. 1
Aug. 17

Aug. 17

Aug. 25

Aug. 29
Sept. 13
Sept. 14
Sept. 21
Sept. 25
Oct. 10
Oct. 12
Oct. 18
Oct. 23
Nov. 6

Nov.

8

Nov. 16
Nov. 20

Dec. 4
Dec. 4
Dec. 16 |
Dec. 18

| Dec. 31 ..Jan. 1, 1912

and h and h

and

and h
and

CONFIGURATIONS.

Aug. 8..
Aug. 13..
Aug. 16.
Sept. 15.
Nov. 10.
Nov. 18.
Nov. 24.
Nov. 26.

PLANETS BY

THE

H.M.

2:23 p.m. 6: 3 p.m. 4:10 p.m. 2: 2 p.m. 2:54 a.m. 3: 3 a.m. 6:43 p.m.

4:52 a.m. 8:39 a.m. 7:31 a.m. 6: 3 a.m. 10:57 p.m. 1:20 p.m. 0:44 a.m. 1:33 p.m. 6:23 p.m. 7:3 p.m. 3:42 a.m. 1:50 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 2:30 a.m. 10:47 p.m. 9:50 a.m. 7:54 a.m. 10:50 a.m.

3: 2 a.m.

Distance
Apart.

2° 0'S. 3° 33' S. 5° 47′ S. 1° 13' N. 4° 2' S. 3° 41' S. 10° 23' S. 1° 41' N. 4° 22' S. 4° 32′ S. 13° 14' S. 2° 11' N. 4° 27' S. 4° 21' S. 7° 39' S. 2° 40′ N. 4° 18' S. 2° 53' S. 1° 13' S. 3° 7' N. 4° 5' S. 0° 50' S. 3° 39' N. 3° 35' N. 4° 1' S. 0° 1' S.

Apr. 10 ŏ 4° 41′ N. May 281° 35′ S. 292° 59' N. Aug. 16 0° 21' N. Sept. 249° 26' N.

May

W.
W.

Inf.

W.

h...Jan. ...Jan.

8, 12 23, 12 h... Feb. 5,

...July 5,

Limiting

Parallels

Between:

90° N. and 19° N.
20° S. and 90° N.

p.m.
p.m.
7:34 a.m. 90° N. and 43° N.
4:13 a.m. 18° S. and 90° S.

MOON.

...Aug. 1,
2: 2 p.m.
..Nov. 16,
1:50 p.m.
.Dec. 4, 10:47 p.m.
.Jan. 1(1912) 3: 1 a.m.

Limiting
Parallels-
Between:

45° S. and 90° S. 88° N. and 30° N. 90° N. and 13° N. 45° N. and 31° S.

Note. The occultations will only be visible within the given parallels of latitude when both the planet and the Moon are above the horizon after dark at the time of in R. A. given. See Table of Conjunctions with the Moon for distance apart of centres.

« PreviousContinue »