Page images
PDF
EPUB

White Star Line.

Office, No. 9 Broadway. New York Plymouth, Cherbourg, Southampton.

[blocks in formation]

Minnewaska
Minnetonka.
Minneapolls.
Minnehaha.
Mesaba..

California..
Caledonia.

Office, No. 9 Broadway.

Liverpool, Holyhead and Queenstown Service.

700

726

700

600

Columbia.

Furnessia.

Cameronia (building).

Belfast.
Belfast.

Belfast.

Belfast.

Belfast.
Belfast.

La Provence
La Savoie.

La Lorraine.
La Touraine.

La Bretagne.

La Gascogne.
Chicago.

La France (building)

Built.

Rotterdam.

Nieuw Amsterdam.

Noordam.

Ryndam.

Potsdam.

Statendam.

Eelfast.
Belfast.

Belfast.

Belfast.

Office, No. 1 Broadway.

United States.

Hellig Olav.

Oscar II..
C F. Tietgen.

Belfast
Philadelphia.
Philadelphia.
Glasgow.

Belfast

Philadelphia.

Fhiladelphia.
Glasgow..

Red Star Line.

New York, Cherbourg, Dover and Antwerp.

Belfast.
Eelfast.

Belfast.

Belfast.
Belfast.

No. 19 Stace street.

Glasgow.
Glasgow.
Glasgow.
Barrow.
Glasgow.

Year. Length.

1910

882

1910

882

1907

726

1899

704

1890

585

1880

585

1901

1904

1902

1903

American Line.

Plymouth, Cherbourg and Southampton.

St Nazaire.

St. Nazaire.
St. Nazaire..
St. Nazaire.
St Nazaire.
Toulon...

St. Nazaire
St Nazaire..

1908

1902

1902

1900

Atlantic Transport Line.

Office, No. 9 Broadway. New York and Londen direct.

Belfast..
Belfast.

Belfast.

Belfast.

1901

1895

1895

1888

Hamburg.
Belfast...

1908

1902

1900

1900

1838

Anchor Line

Office, No. 17 Broadway. New York, Moville and Glasgow.

1996-7

1904

1901

1580

1911

French Line.

New York and Havre direct.

620

580

580

580

1904

1909

1899

1890

1886

1886

1907

1910

560

554

554

560

1908

1995

1902

1901

1899

1898

Scandinavian-American Line.

616

C00

600

600

482

1903

1902

1901

1897

485

515

503

445

540

624

580

580

Tonnage. Speed. gross. knots.

536

EOS

508

524

726

45,000

45,000

24,541

17,274

9.963

9.984

20.904

23,876

21,400

15.865

GGS

615

Holland-America

Line.

Office No. 41 Broadway. New York, Boulogne and Rotterdam.

570

570

570

530

18.000

12,000

12,000

11.899

515

515

515

485

10,786

11,629

11,629

10.798

14.220

13,398

13.401

13.403

6.833

9,000

9,400

8,900

5.495

12.000

18,400

15,000

15,000

9,778

7,315

7,645

11,103

23.500

24.170

17.250

12.540

12,540

12,606

10,490

19,000
10.000

21.00

21.00

17.00

20.00

19.00

19.00

10,000
8,500

16.99

16.00

16.00

13.00

17.00

15.00

15.00

15.00

19.00

19.00

19.00

19.00

17.00

15.00

15.00

15.00

13.00

15.00 18.00

18.00

13.00

19.00

New York. Christiansand. Christiania and Copenhagen.

Glasgow.

Glasgow.
Glasgow.
Belfast.

23.00

21.00

21.00

19.00

17.00

17.00

16.00

25.00

17.00

15.00

15.00

15.00

15.00 15.00

1712 174

1714 19.00

Steamer.

Mauretania (eastbound).
Mauretania (westbound)
Lusitania (eastbound)
Lusitania westbound)
La Provence (eastbound).
La Provence (westbound).
Dutschland (eastbound).
Deutschland (westbound).
11 54 Hamburg-America.
Deutschland (New York to Naples) 7 18 44 Hamburg-America.
Kronprinzessin Cecilie (eastbind).[5 7 25 North German Lloyd.
Kronprinzessin Cecilie (westb'nd) 5 10 23 North German Lloyd.

5

7 3 Hamburg-America.

5

TRANSATLANTIC RECORDS,

Time.

D.H.M

4 13 41 unard.
4 10 41 Cunard.

4 15 52 Cunard.

4 11 42 Cunard.

4 44 French.

1 48 French.

6

6

Line.

Date.

Scpt. 20, 1909
Sept. 11, 1910
Sept. 29, 1909
Aug. 29, 1909
May 9, 1906
Sept. 13, 1907
1900
Sept. 5, 1903
Jan. 28, 1904
Sept. 20, 1909
Sept. 12, 1999

Date.

1882.

1856....Persia
1809....City of Brussels.
1975....City of Berlin.
1877....Brittanic

Alaska

Line. White Star.

Red Star...

French..

American..

Cunard.

Scandinavian

House flag.
Red, with white star.
White flag with red star..
White flag, red disc in corner..
White, with blue spread eagle.

Red, with golden lion rampant.

Anchor..

White with red anchor......

Atlantic Transport.. Tri-color bars, red, white and blue, with stars

Speed Progress of Steamships from 1856 to 1911.

Steamer.

Steamer.

American

Line.

American

Atlantic Transport

Red Star

White Star

Holland-America
Wilson Line
Scandinavian-American
Hamburg-American
North German Lloyd.
Cunard

Anchor

French

Austro-American

Italian
Spanish

Fabre .......

Hamburg-American Blue key and anchor crossed in centro of wreath on white fag..

North German Lloyd Black anchor and golden shield in centre of blue and white flag; shield having letters "H. A. P. A. G.".

White Maltese cross on blue field..

Date.

Time.

.9d. 1h. 45m. 1884....America
7d. 22h. 3m. 1888....Etruria

7d. 15h. 48m. 1891. ..Teutonic
.7d. 10h. 53m.||1907....Lusitania
. 6d. 18h. 37m. 1910.... Mauretania

Funnel Marks and House Flags.

Red, with black top Holland-America... Two green bars, with white bar in cen-Fellow, with two tre, on which appears in black letters green bands, and "N. A. S. M." white band in centre.

Location of Steamship Piers.

Pier.

62 North River.
58 North River.
59 North River.
60-61 North River..

Hoboken

Hoboken

Hoboken

Hoboken..

Hoboken

54 North River.
64 North River.
37 North River.
South Brooklyn
64 North River.
8 East River..
Brooklyn

Time.

.63. 10h.
.6d. 1h. 55m.
5d. 16h. 31m.
.4d. 22h. 50m.

Funnel marks.
Buff with black top.
Black with white band
Red, with black top.
Black, with white
band.

Buff.

Red, black rings, black top.

Black.

Regular
black;
service, buff.

service.
express

Black, with wide red band.

Location.

West 23d street
West 17th street
West 19th street
West 22d street
5th street

7th street
17th street
Lackawanna Ferry
Lackawanna Ferry
West 14th street
West 24th street
West 13th street
Pier 5
West 34th street

Pier 33

Cape Race Sable Island Nantucket.

Antwerp Azores Cherbourg

Dover

Fastnet

Genoa

Gibraltar

Hamburg Havre

Iron, foundries and nails..
Machinery and tools...

Woolens, carpets and knit goods.
Cottons, lace and hosiery.
Lumber, carpenters and coopers.
Clothing and millinery..
Hats, gloves and furs..
Chemicals and drugs.
Paints and oils..
Printing and engraving.
Milling and Bakers.

Leather, shoes and harness
Liquors and tobacco..

Glass, earthenware and bricks.
All other.

Total manufacturing.

Traders.

General stores....
Groceries, meats and fish.
Hotels and restaurants.
Liquors and tobacco..
Clothing and furnishing.
Dry goods and carpets.
Shoes, rubbers and trunks.
Furniture and crockery
Hardware, stoves and tools.
Chemicals and drugs..
Paints and oils....
Jewelry and clocks.
Books and papers..
Hats, furs and gloves.
All other...

1,063 miles Fire Island
68.3 miles Pattery

||

192.9 miles Ambrose Channel Lightship.

From Ambrose Channel Lightship.

3,323 miles
2,227 miles
3,073 miles
3,190 miles
2,751 miles
4,021 miles
3,168 miles

3,511 miles
3,145 miles

Manufacturers.

Sea Distances.

From Sandy Hook.

COMMERCIAL FAILURES IN THE U. S., 1909-'10. [Reported by The Mercantile Agency, R. G. Dun & Co.]

Number.

Liabilities.

...........

Liverpool

Lizard Point London

Naples

Plymouth

Queenstown
Rotterdam

Southampton

*1910. 1909. 73 196

35

16

376

446

82 163

26

18

409

521 57

30

15

179 236

69

43

25

24

175

261

81

118

114

102 112 1,211 1,053

3,237 3,030

1,243 1,512 2,361

2,344. 535

481

723

959

913

827

599

579

360 358 219 229

249

296

320

345

49

48

231

263

87

111

Year. No.

1866.. 1,505

1867.

2,780

1868.

2,608

1869.

2,799

1870. 1871.

1872.

Total trading. Brokers and transporters.

Total commercial.. Banking

3,546

2,915

4,069 1873.. 5,183 1874.. 5,830 1875.. 7.740 1876.. 9,092 1877.. 8,872 1878.. 10.478 1879.. 6,658 1880.. 4,735

Liabilities. Year. I No.

$53,783,000 1881..

96.666,000|1882..
63,694,000 1883..
75,054,054 1884.
88,242,000 1885.
85,252,000 1886.
121,056,000||1887..
228,499,900 1888.
155,239,000 1889.
201,000,000 1890.
191,117,000, 1891.
190,669,9361892.
234,383,132 1893.
98,149,053) 1894.
65,752,000 1895.

5,582
6.738

9,184

10.968

10,637

9.834
9.634

10.679

10.882

10,907
12.273

10,344

15.242

13.885

13,197

43 41 1,096 1,037 8,934 9,324 423 370

33 miles 19.3 miles S miles

3,033 miles 2,929 miles 3,257 miles 4,116 miles 2.978 miles 2,814 miles

"Twelve months to October 31. Other years calendar years.

COMMERCIAL FAILURES IN THE UNITED STATES, 1866-1910.

3,327 miles
3,095 miles

$75.539,076
36,640,803

1910.
$12,131,445
5,338,938
926.676
1,624.386
13,657,416
6,078,648
645,811
254,178

323,340
4,681,578

1,607,453
2,271,111]
4,059,320

2,092,282

4.908.735

4,660,199 27,394.994

18,600,275 $85,650,493 $64,716,548

1909.

$9,367.978 5,940,697 2,323.186

465.224

8,526,745
4,826,047

Liabilities. Year. I
$81,155,932 1896..
101,547,564 1897.
172,874,172 1898.
220,343.4271899..
124,220,3211900..
114,644,1191901.
167,560,944 1902.
128,829,973 1903.
148,784.337 1904.
189,856.961 1905.
189,808,038 1900..
114,044,1671907..
346,779,889 1908..
172,992.851909.
173,196,0601910.

$8.982,673 $10.517.353

9.028,450
5,954,460

4.878,753

566,677

226,523

863,570

9.007.008

4,186,146 5,022,048

8,112,315 7.621,342

10,260.364

8,731,805
2.262,294

2.279.402
2.212.917
3.172,935

1,874,122

280,616 3,639,288 579.162

502.283 13.781,270

2,370,009

2.252,829

1,384,771

2,085,872

2.985,886

1,598,304

241,054 2,431,054 906.984

497.714

10.999.904

$69,094,768 20.792.149

12,614 12,824||$197,830,432 $154,603,465 100 80 31.943,083 24.677.128

No. Liabilities. 15,088 $226,096,834 13,351 154,332,071 12,186 130,662,899 .9.337 90,879,889

10.774 138,495,673

11.002

113.092.379

117.476.749

11.615
12.069

145.444.185
144,202.311

12,199

11.520 102,670,172 10.682 119,201,515

197.385.225
222,315.684

11.725
15.090

12.924 154.603,465

12,614 197,830,432

PRESIDENTIAL AND VICE-PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, 1908.

WILLIAM H. TAFT, of Ohio.

WILLIAM J. BRYAN, of Nebraska.

EUGENE V. DEBS, of Indiana.

EUGENE W. CHAPIN, of Illinois.

THOMAS E. WATSON. of Georgia.

SAMUEL W. WILLIAMS, of Indiana. Socialist Labor-July 5.

| DONALD L. MUNRO, of Virginia. Independence-July 27-29.

THOMAS L. HISGEN, of Massachusetts. JOHN TEMPLE GRAVES, of Georgia.

MARTIN R. PRESTON, of Nevada.

REPUBLICAN.

The Republican National Convention was held in Chicago, June 16-19. Nine hundred and eighty delegates were admitted under the terms of the National Committee's call. Julius C. Burrows, of Michigan, was chosen temporary chairman on June 16, and Henry Cabot Lodge, of Massachusetts, permanent chairman on June 17. On June 17 a report from the committee on rules was adopted, which allotted representation in the next convention to the territories and dependencies as follows: Arizona, 6 delegates; Hawall, 6; New Mexico, 6; Alaska. 2; the District of Columbia 2; Porto Rico, 2: the Philippines, 2. A minority resolution, offered by Representative Burke, of Pennsylvania, sought to establish an entirely new basis of representation. It provided that each state should hereafter be entitled to four delegates-at-large and one additional delegate for every ten thousand Republican votes polled, or majority fraction thereof, for Republican electors at the last preceding Presidential election. It gave four delegates apiece to Arizona, Hawali and New Mexico and two apiece to Alaska, the District of Columbia, Porto Rico and the Philippines. This minority resolution was defeated by L06 votes to 471, three delegates not voting.

The platform, published in full below, was adopted without division on June 18, after a minority report, offered by Representative Cooper, of Wisconsin, had been rejected. Separate votes were taken on three planks in the minority report. That recommending the passage by Congress of a law requiring national committees to make public campaign contributions as received during a national campaign was rejected by 880 votes to 14. That favoring a physical valuation of the railroads by the Interstate Commerce Commission was rejected by 917 votes to 63. That approving the popular election of Senators was rejected by 866 votes to 114.

On June 18 William H. Taft, of Ohio, was nominated for President on the first ballot. He received 702 votes, to 68 for Philander C. Knox, of Pennsylvania; 67 for Charles E. Hughes, of New York, 58 for Joseph G. Cannon, of Illinois; 40 for Charles W. Fairbanks, of Indiana; 25 for Robert M. La Follette, of Wisconsin; 16 for Joseph B. Foraker, of Ohio, and 3 for Theodore Roosevelt, of New York. One delegate from South Carolina did not vote. The vote by states was:

[blocks in formation]

Republican-June 16-19.

| JAMES S. SHERMAN, of New York.
Democratic-July 7-10.

JOHN W. KERN, of Indiana.
Socialist-May 14-15.

BENJAMIN HANFORD, of New York.
Prohibitionist-July 15-16.

AARON S. WATKINS, of Ohio.
Populist-April 3.

20

10

14

6

10

17

26

20

24

18

12

16

32

27

36

16

Fair

1

Hughes. Cannon banks. Knox. Follette. Foraker

Roosevelt.

[graphic]

N. Hampshire.
New Jersey
New York.
N. Carolina...
North Dakota.
Ohio

Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
'Rhode Island..

S. Carolina..
South Dakota..
Tennessee

Texas

Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
W. Virginia..
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Alaska
Arizona

D. of Columbia
Hawaii
New Mexico...
Philippine Isl..
Porto Rico....

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Totals

1 ...... 702

67

58 1 40

68

On June 19 James S. Sherman, of New York, was nominated for Vice-President, receiving 816 votes on the first ballot, to 77 for Franklin Murphy, of New Jersey: 75 for Curtis Guild, Jr., of Massachusetts; 10 for George L Sheldon, of Nebraska, and 1 for Charles W. Fairbanks, of Indiana.

The Platform.

The platform, adopted on June 18, was as follows:

Once more the Republican party, in national convention assembled, submits its cause to the people. This great historic organization, that destroyed slavery, preserved the Union, restored credit, expanded the national domain, established a sound financial system, developed the industries and resources of the country and gave to the nation her seat of honor in the councils of the world, now meets the new problems of government with the same courage and capacity with which it solved the old.

In this the great era of American advancement the Republican party has reached Its highest service under the leadership of Theodore Roosevelt. His administration is an epoch in American history. In no other period since national Republicanism Bovereignty was won under Washington, or preserved under LinUnder Roosevelt. coln, has there been such mighty progress in those ideals of government which make for justice, equality and fair dealing among men. The highest aspirations of the American people have found a volce. Their most exalted servant represents the, best alms and worthiest purposes of all his countrymen. American manhood has been lifted to a nobler sense of duty and obligation. Conscience and courage in public station and higher standards of right and wrong in private life have become cardinal principles of political falth: capital and labor have been brought into closer relations of confidence and interdependence, and the abuse of wealth, the tyranny of power and all the evils of privilege and favoritism have been put to scorn by the simple, manly virtues of justice and fair play.

The great accomplishments of President Roosevelt have been, first and foremost. a brave and impartial enforcement of the law, the prosecution of illegal trusts and monopolies, the exposure and punishment of evildoers in the public service, the more effective regulation of the rates and service of the great transportation lines, the complete overthrow of preferences, rebates and discriminations, the arbitration of labor disputes, the amelioration of the condition of wageworkers everywhere, the conservation of the natural resources of the country, the forward step in the improvement of the Inland waterways, and always the earnest support and defence of every wholesome safeguard which has made more secure the guarantees of life, liberty and property.

These are the achievements that will make for Theodore Roosevelt his place in history, but more than all else the great things he has done will be an inspiration to those who have yet greater things to do. We declare our unfaltering adherence to the policies thus inaugurated and pledge their continuance under a Republican administration of the government.

Under the guidance of Republican principles the American people have become the richest nation in the world. Our wealth to-day exceeds that of England and all her colonies, and that of France and Germany combined. When the ReEquality of publican party was born the total wealth of the country was $16.000,Opportunity. 000,000. It has leaped to $110,000,000,000 in a generation, while Great

Britain has gathered but $60,000,000,000 in 500 years. The United

« PreviousContinue »