The Extraordinary Black Book: An Exposition of Abuses in Church and State, Courts of Law, Representation, Municipal and Corporate Bodies, with a Précis of the House of Commons, Past, Present, and to Come

Front Cover
Effingham Wilson, 1832 - Church and state - 683 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Lectureships public charities surplice fees new churches
48
Impositions practised in repect of poor livinga
55
Comparative cost of Church of England and other churches
63
True policy of the church expounded
70
Defects in the book of Common Prayer
76
Rights of layimpropriators examined
91
CHAPTER III
137
Wealth bequeathed to their families by the bishops
142
Statement of sums to be paid in lieu of tithes in several parishes
148
Estimate of the revenues of the Protestant establishment
154
Nonresidence of bishops and parochial clergy
160
Proportion of Roman Catholics and Protestants
166
Return of promotions in the Irish church
172
Crisis of the Irish church at the close of 1831
179
Origin and history of the crown lands
186
Amount and appropriation of landed revenues
192
Estimate of the value of crown lands
195
Fourandahalf per cent Leeward Island duties
203
Statement of produce of hereditary revenues of the crown
210
Publication of the court pensionlist
216
Total expenditure from accession of Geo III to the death of
225
Peculiar death of Geo IV and his chief counsellors
234
Number and constitution of the kings privy council
244
Consular establishments
250
Clergy lords and commons deviated from original objects of their
256
Injustice of aristocratic taxation
262
Aristocratic game lawsa specimen of late tyranny of the
268
Diminutive income of the Peerage compared with that of other
275
Increase of the peerage
281
LAW AND COURTS OF
286
A lawyers library described
290
Legislation an afterdinner amusement of the house of commons
296
Summary of Legal Abuses and Defects
302
Defects in agreements for leases and conveyances
308
Law of debtor and creditor
315
Oppressions under the exciselaws
321
PROGRESS OF THE PUBLIC DEBT AND TAXES
334
WORKING 3 OF TAXATION
385
Irresponsible power of the Times newspaper
391
Origin and progress of the Company
395
Indian wars and territorial acquisitions
401
Territorial revenues of India
412
Thoughts on the renewal of the Companys charter
418
Extravagant expenditure of Company and necessity of retrench
424
Origin and progress of the Bank
430
Mischiefs of irresponsible power of Bank over the eirculation
436
MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS COMPANIES GUILDS
452
Rise and downfal of MerchantTailors Company of Bristol
458
Corporation of City of London
464
Corporation of Preston
471
Corporation of Leeds
474
Salaries and number of persons employed in the public offices
480
Pensionroll amounts to 805022 per annum
489
Salaries and pensions exceeding 1000
497
CHAPTER XVII
500
Principles which government has been carried on by Tory admi
503
HOUSE OF COMMONS PAST PRESENT AND TO COME
591
Constitutional deductions
597
Universal suffrage impracticability and mischievousness of
603
Constitutional changes valueless in themselves
606
Population houses c of boroughs not disfranchised
612
Number of parliaments held in each reign
621
APPENDIX
627
Return of cities and towns with a population exceeding
636
Returns of Army and Navy halfpay and retired allowances
640
Number of public creditors and amount of their dividends
642
Population free and slaves imports and exports of the Colonies
643
House of Lords origin and character of
644
Borough lords and their Representatives
647
Ecclesiastical Patronage of each of the Nobility and the value of Rectories and Vicarages in their gift
650
Return of the amount of church rates county rates and high way rates c in each county of England and Wales
668
Return of lay and clerical magistrates
669
Commissioners of sewers institution of and abuses in their administration
670
Progress of Population in Great Britain
672

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 366 - Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state.
Page 76 - Thou shalt not make to thyself any graven image, nor the likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or in the earth beneath, or in the water under the earth. Thou shalt not bow down to them, nor worship them...
Page 292 - ... shall be understood to include several matters as well as one matter, and several persons as well as one person, and females as well as males, and bodies corporate as well as individuals, unless it be otherwise specially provided, or there be something in the subject or context repugnant to such construction...
Page 365 - The subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities ; that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state.
Page 2 - The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the Roman world, were all considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful.
Page 366 - Thirdly, by the forfeitures and other penalties which those unfortunate individuals incur who attempt unsuccessfully to evade the tax, it may frequently ruin them, and thereby put an end to the benefit which the community might have received from the employment of their capitals.
Page 77 - The Body and Blood of Christ, which are verily and indeed taken and received by the faithful in the Lord's Supper.
Page 76 - ... renounce the devil and all his works, and constantly believe God's holy word, and obediently keep his commandments. I demand therefore, DOST thou, in the name of this child, renounce the devil and all his works, the vain pomp and glory of the world, with all covetous desires of the same, and the carnal desires of the flesh, so that thou wilt not follow nor be led by them ? Answ.
Page 291 - Statute shall be understood to include several Matters as well as One Matter, and several Persons as well as One Person, and Females as well as Males, and Bodies Corporate as well as Individuals, unless it be otherwise specially provided, or there be something in the Subject or Context repugnant to such Construction...
Page 366 - The expense of government to the individuals of a great nation, is like the expense of management to the joint tenants of a great estate, who are all obliged to contribute in proportion to their respective interests in the estate. In the observation or neglect of this maxim consists, what is called, the equality or inequality of taxation.

Bibliographic information