Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a Garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross... "
Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge - Page 70
1838
Full view - About this book

The English Garden: a Poem. Book the First. By W. Mason, M.A., Volume 1

William Mason - Gardens - 1778 - 35 pages
...WITHOUT WHICH BUILDINGS AND PALACES ARE BUT GROSS HANDY-WORKS. AND A MAN SHALL EVER SEE, THAT WHEN AGES GROW TO CIVILITY AND ELEGANCY, MEN COME TO BUILD STATELY, SOONER THAN TO GARDEN FINELY I AS IF GARDENING WERE THE GREATER PERFECTION. VERULA M. LONDON PRINTED: And Sold by J. DODSLEY, in...
Full view - About this book

Poems, Volume 2

William Mason - 1796
...WITHOUT WHICH BUILDINGS AND PALACES ARE BUT GR09S HANDYWORKS. AND A MAN SHALL EVER SE*, THAT WHEN AGES GROW TO CIVILITY AND ELEGANCY, MEN COME TO BUILD STATELY, SOONER THAN TO GARDEN FIN ELY : AS IFC.A&PENING WERK THE GREATER PERFECTION. VERULAM. THE ENGLISH GARDEN. BOOK THE FIRST....
Full view - About this book

The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 184

1896
...in all wholesome Art, and gardening at its best is a fine art. For ever true is what Bacon says : ' Men come to build stately sooner than to ' garden...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection.' To borrow illustrations from other arts, the champions of the formal garden would stop short at the...
Full view - About this book

Essays, Biographical, Critical, and Historical, Illustrative of ..., Volume 3

Nathan Drake - English literature - 1805
...be the most decisive proof of civilization ; " a man shall ever see," he remarks, " that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately,...finely: as if gardening were the greater perfection *." It is, therefore, highly to the credit of Addition, that at a time when the style of gardening...
Full view - About this book

Essays Biographical, Critical, and Historical, Illustrative of the ..., Volume 2

Nathan Drake - English literature - 1805
...be the most decisive proof of civilization ; " a man shall ever see," he remarks, " that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately,...finely: as if gardening were the greater perfection *." It is, therefore, highly to the credit of Addison, that at a time when the style of gardening was...
Full view - About this book

The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature

English literature - 1805
...has been cultivated with the greatest success-: ' For when ages advance in civility and politeness, men come to build stately sooner than to garden finely :' as if gardening was the greater perfection. In laying out grounds they so excel, that lord Macartney gives them the...
Full view - About this book

The Works of William Mason, M.A. Precentor of York, and Rector of Aston ...

William Mason - Gardens - 1811
...without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks. And a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately,...finely : as if gardening were the greater perfection. VERULAM. PREFACE. As the Four Books, which compose the following Poem, were published originally at...
Full view - About this book

The Works of William Mason, Volume 1

William Mason - 1811
...without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks. And a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately,...finely : as if gardening were the greater perfection. VERULAM. A PREFACE. As the Four Books, which compose the following Poem, were published originally...
Full view - About this book

Aristotle's Treatise on Poetry, Translated: With Notes on the ..., Volume 2

Aristotle, Thomas Twining - Aesthetics - 1812
...respect to the superiority of gardening to architecture : " A man shall ever see, that when " ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to " build...; as " if gardening were the greater perfection." The truth, however, of the fact here asserted by Aristotle, appears, not only from the earlier dramatic...
Full view - About this book

Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1812 - 295 pages
...without which buildings and palaces are but gross handy works : and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately,...finely; as if gardening were the greater perfection. I do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF