Silver in the Fifty-first Congress: Preceded by a Summary of the Coinage Laws of the United States, Prior to 1873, and a History of the Act of 1873 and the Act of 1878

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 48 - An act to authorize the coinage of the standard silver dollar, and to restore its legal-tender character. Be it enacted . . . , That there shall be coined, at the several mints of the United States, silver dollars of the weight of...
Page 115 - The power of governing and of legislating for a territory is the inevitable consequence of the right to acquire and to hold territory. Could this position be contested, the constitution of the United States declares that "congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States.
Page 92 - States, and when so redeemed may be re-issued ; but no greater or less amount of such notes shall be outstanding at any time than the cost of the silver bullion, and the standard silver dollars coined therefrom, then held in the Treasury purchased by such notes...
Page 149 - That the Treasury notes issued in accordance with the provisions of this act shall be redeemable on demand, in coin, at the Treasury of the United States, or at the office of any assistant treasurer of the United States, and when so redeemed may be reissued. But no greater or less amount of such notes shall be outstanding at any time than the cost of the silver bullion and the standard silver dollars coined therefrom, then held in the Treasury purchased by such notes.
Page 50 - United States notes, and of all the interest-bearing obligations of the United States, except in cases where the law authorizing the issue of any such obligation has expressly provided that the same may be paid in lawful money or other currency than gold and silver.
Page 70 - Such certificates shall be receivable for customs, taxes, and all public dues, and when so received may be reissued...
Page 92 - That upon demand of the holder of any of the Treasury notes herein provided for, the Secretary of the Treasury shall, under such regulations as he may prescribe, redeem such notes in gold or silver coin, at his discretion, it being the established policy of the United States to maintain the two metals on a parity with each other upon the present legal ratio, or such ratio as may be provided by law.
Page 50 - ... the faith of the United States is solemnly pledged to the payment in coin, or its equivalent of all the obligations of the United States...
Page 66 - ... a sum sufficient to carry into effect the provisions of this act is hereby appropriated out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated.
Page 48 - January eighteenth, eighteen hundred thirty seven, on which shall be the devices and superscriptions provided by said act; which coins together with all silver dollars heretofore coined by the United States of like weight and fineness shall be a legal tender at their nominal value, for all debts and dues public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract.

Bibliographic information