Papers Relating to the Foreign Relations of the United States

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1881 - United States
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 525 - I will support, protect and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States, and the Constitution and Government of the State of Nevada, against all enemies, whether domestic or foreign, and that I will bear true faith, allegiance, and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution or law of any State convention or Legislature to the contrary notwithstanding...
Page 523 - States, either the regular or the volunteer forces, and has been or may be hereafter honorably discharged, shall be admitted to become a citizen of the United States, upon his petition, without any previous declaration of his intention to become such; and he shall not be required to prove more than one year's residence within the United States previous to his application to become such citizen; and the court admitting such alien shall, in addition to such proof of residence and good moral character,...
Page 13 - The position of the United States as the leading power of the New World might well give to its government a claim to authoritative utterance for the purpose of quieting discord among its neighbors, with all of whom the most friendly relations exist.
Page 537 - The United States recognizes a proper guarantee of neutrality as essential to the construction and successful operation of any highway across the Isthmus of Panama, and in the last generation every step was taken by this government that is deemed requisite in the premises. The necessity was foreseen and abundantly provided for, long in advance of any possible call for the actual exercise of power. In...
Page 31 - States, may have become citizens of any one of the states, under the laws thereof, being under the age of twenty-one years at the time of the naturalization of their parents, shall, if dwelling in the United States, be considered as citizens thereof...
Page 440 - SIR, I have received the letter, which you did me the honor to write to me on the...
Page 147 - But this government feels that the exercise of the right of absolute conquest is dangerous to the best interests of all the republics of this continent ; that from it are certain to spring other wars and political disturbances; and that it imposes, even upon the conqueror, burdens which are scarcely compensated by the apparent increase of strength which it gives. This government also holds that between two independent nations, hostilities do not, from the mere existence of war, confer the right of...
Page 532 - That an accused person shall immediately upon arrest be informed of the specific crime or offense upon which he is held, and that he shall be afforded an opportunity for a speedy trial before an impartial court and jury, are essentials to every criminal prosecution, necessary alike to the protection of innocence and the ascertainment of guilt.
Page 540 - as an indication of unfriendly feeling." And then, in language which distinctly suggests the Monroe Doctrine, the Secretary pointed out that "while . . . observing the strictest neutrality with respect to complications abroad, it is the long-settled conviction of this government that any extension to our shores of the political system by which the great powers have controlled and determined events in Europe would be attended with danger to the peace and welfare of this nation.
Page 639 - And if, through any cause, the maintenance of such a position of benevolent neutrality should be found by Hawaii to be impracticable, this government would then unhesitatingly meet the altered situation by seeking an avowedly American solution for the grave issues presented.

Bibliographic information