Page images
PDF
EPUB

REPORT.

Arrangements were completed during the year for giving, as mentioned in last year's report, special facilities for the sons of tenant farmers in East Sussex to attend this College. Such students up to a certain number can now attend for an inclusive fee, for tuition, board and residence, of £10. The complaint often made on behalf of farmers that the fees charged at agricul tural colleges are beyond their means, at any rate does not hold here. But though the fees may be low, the quality of instruction is of a sound order, and that of the various examinations is high. though practical. For instance, when examined in poultry work, a student may have to do as much as a full week's work in the poultry yard before his examination is completed.

During the past session the number of students at the College was as under :

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Of the above students only one third came from Sussex, the remainder being drawn from Cheshire, Cumberland, Essex, Hampshire, Lincolnshire, London, Surrey, and Yorkshire, while one came from Ireland. Three other students came respectively from France, Egypt, and the East Indies. Four of the above students came with county scholarships from East Sussex, three of them being sons of tenant farmers at the reduced fee. Almost all the students received instruction in butter-making, it being compulsory on all students taking an agricultural course to have two lessons per week for six weeks in this subject.

EXTERNAL WORK.

Lectures.-Courses of five lectures each in horticulture were held at 11 centres in East Sussex. The average attendance at each was 39. Much interest is being evoked in this work, and farmers in the county are now turning their attention to fruitgrowing, and ask for special lectures on the subject. The five subsidiary fruit stations, mentioned in last year's report as having been established, are of considerable use in connection with the lecture courses.

Poultry-keeping lectures were held at 12 centres, courses of five lectures being held at each of them. The average attendance was 68.

Field Demonstrations.-A similar experiment on the manuring of meadow land to that conducted at the College farm was carried out at one centre in the county. Another experiment of a more temporary character on the same crop was carried out at three other centres in the county.

COLLEGE FARM.

This is mainly used as a training farm, but various experiments, of which one on the manuring of meadow hay has been mentioned above, are carried out.

The poultry section of the farm is being steadily developed, and several experiments in this branch are conducted, as on the relative merits of dry and soft foods, and on the advantages of rearing chickens under hens or "foster mothers." The breeding and rearing of turkeys has now been taken up.

FRUIT STATION.

This continues to grow in interest, and experiments initiated there in past years are now yielding useful results. The use of the place, however, as a training ground for the students in pruning and the general management of fruit trees, involves the regular planting of fresh trees.

FINANCES.

The

The expenditure on this institution during the past financial year, including the expenses of the farm and fruit station, but exclusive of capital expenditure, amounted to £4,820. receipts included students' fees, £1,478; sale of produce, £907; miscellaneous amounts, £138; and the Board's grant of £200. The balance was defrayed by the East Sussex County Council.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Winter School of Agriculture.-This school is intended for young men who are entering upon an agricultural career. The aim is to impart instruction in the cultivation of the soil, the growth of crops, and the rearing of stock, based upon a knowledge of the sciences on which the practice of agriculture depends.

The complete course of instruction is divided into two parts. Course I. occupies the five weeks immediately preceding Christmas and is devoted to the consideration of “The Soil and its Cultivation" and "Tillage Crops": Course II. occupies the first four weeks of the new year and is devoted to "Fodder Crops" and "Farm Stock."

The instruction comprises agriculture, chemistry, physics, botany, and zoology, the four last subjects being accompanied by practical laboratory work. The lectures on agriculture are supplemented by field and other demonstrations, but no instruction is given in the actual processes of farm work, it being held that these must be learnt upon the farm itself. The school, in fact, is intended to supplement farm training, not to replace it.

County School of Horticulture.-Four courses of instruction for young gardeners in the principles and operations of horticulture, including fruit, vegetable, and flower culture, are arranged. The classes are organized to give systematic laboratory and garden instruction to gardening pupils who are unable to attend for more than three or four weeks at a time. The complete junior course of instruction is given in the four terms corresponding with the four seasons of the year. Three of the terms last for three weeks each, and one of a more advanced character lasts for four and a half weeks. In the intervals between the courses students are supposed to be engaged in gardening and putting into practice the principles and methods taught at the school,

Term and scholarship examinations are held and students of the advanced class are required to sit at the Royal Horticultural Society's general examination.

Two scholarships are offered, each of the value of £45 for one year, tenable at the County Horticulture school, to be competed for at the examination of the advanced course.

Dairy School.

follows:-
:-

Two courses of instruction are provided as

(1) An elementary two weeks' course, including practical butter and soft-cheese making, and the general management of a small dairy.

(2) A more advanced course, extending over six weeks, of theoretical instruction in the management of milk, cream, butter, and cheese, management of dairy stock, dairy chemistry, and bacteriology, accounts, and poultry management.

In both courses the greater part of the day is occupied with practical work in the dairies, the remainder of the time being taken up with lectures and laboratory work.

Science Classes.-Instruction in chemistry and physics, with special reference to the industry in which they are employed, is given to the students of the County schools of Horticulture and Dairying by means of lectures and laboratory work throughout the session.

The course in dairy chemistry includes practical instruction in the methods used for testing milk, determining acidity and other chemical and physical tests commonly used in dairies and factories.

The course in dairy bacteriology includes practical instruction in the physiology of dairy bacteria and the application of bacteriology in the preservation of milk and in butter and cheese making.

Normal Classes.--Winter classes for the training of teachers

in

(a) Elementary science and chemistry (inorganic and organic). The course should qualify a teacher to teach elementary experimental science (i.e. nature study on its chemical and physical side) in schools.

An advanced course of instruction in physics and inorganic and organic chemistry is provided for those who have already completed an elementary course. It consists of lectures accompanied by experimental work, including qualitative and quantitative analysis. The complete course occupies at least two years (a portion may in certain cases be omitted), and should qualify a teacher to teach chemistry in schools and local science classes.

(b) Botany, nature study, and horticulture, with special reference to the teaching of nature study in schools. The work consists of lectures and laboratory work, and in horticulture, demonstrations in the gardens. This class is continued as a series of field rambles during the summer.

(e) A holiday course of instruction in the principles and practice of horticulture for teachers is held in the month of August, and lasts for a fortnight.

Evening Classes.-Classes for practical instruction in chemistry, botany, &c., are held on two evenings a week from October to May.

on

Market Day Lectures.-Public lectures and addresses various agricultural topics are given regularly on Friday afternoons during the winter. The lectures begin at 3 o'clock, and are usually limited to half an hour.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The work at this institution has continued on the same lines as mentioned in the report for last year.

The analytical work, which has always formed a feature here, has been steadily increasing and during the past year a large number of samples of food stuffs, manures, soils, &c., have been dealt with from Essex, and from Hertfordshire as well, arrangements to that effect having been made between the two counties. The object in making these analyses is not only to give farmers particulars as regards the food stuffs and manures they purchase, but to provide them generally with reliable scientific information as regards the composition of materials in daily use. They are made as educational and practical as possible, and in reporting on samples sent for analysis every effort is made to avoid the mere issuing of figures which, while of great importance when properly interpreted, are not easily understood by the farmer without some

« PreviousContinue »