Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Dairying.–

Poultry Keeping.--Six lectures were given at one centre and three at another on this subject to an average audience of 18.

Bee Keeping.–This work is carried out through experts of the Surrey Bee-keepers' Association. 33 lectures and demonstrations with bees, modern hives, and appliances, were given at 29 centres. Each lecture and demonstration lasted from three to four hours The natural history of bees, their habits, requirements, diseases and management were always treated, and the average attendance was over 200. Instruction was also given to nearly 600 bee-keepers by experts visiting them at their apiaries, examining their stocks, &c., and giving advice. The work carried out during the year shows a continued steady progress and advancement in all branches of the bee-keeping industry in Surrey. The number of bee-keepers is increasing, and there is much improvement in their methods of management, &c. Their bee products are prepared with greater care and consequently there is an increasing demand for Surrey honey.

Farm Hygiene.—One of the lectures enumerated under the head of agriculture had reference to this subject.

Farriery.-
Manual Processes.-

[blocks in formation]

Horticulture.—Lectures were given on fruit, flower, and vegetable culture at 18 centres. Six lectures were given at each of 17 centres and 12 lectures at the remaining centre. In addition, addresses were given at 20 local shows. The average attendance at the lectures was about 26. In addition, lectures on “Science for gardeners were given to six gardeners' societies through the South-Eastern Agricultural College. Three lectures were given to one society, two to another, and single lectures to the remaining four. The average attendance was 95. Lectures also on the science and practice of horticulture were given through the College at four centres. Three lectures were given at each centre to an average attendance of 29. Two lectures on the same subject were given to each of two gardeners' societies to an average attendance of 48.

School or other Gardens.—There were gardens attached to 59 Elementary Day schools in this county, all of which were worked on the individual plot system. The total number of pupils who received instruction was 993. There were also il Evening school gardens at which 133 pupils received instruction. The boys thoroughly enjoy this form of teaching.

Fruit-growing Stations. There is one fruit-growing station in this county devoted to experimental and demonstrational fruit culture.

Training of Elementary School Teachers.-A summer vacation class was held at Wye for two weeks, when instruction was given in chemistry, botany, horticulture, bee-keeping, land measurement, &c. The class was attended by 35 teachers from this county.

!

EAST SUSSEX.

County Staff

See Agricultural and Horticultural College, Uckfield (page 58).

Organisation. The agricultural education work of this county is conducted entirely through the staff of the above college.

School or College.-The above college was founded and is maintained by the County Council.

Agriculture.-Lectures were given at several centres in the county explanatory of the results of the field experiments carried out.

Field Experiments. In addition to the work on the College farm, trials on the manuring of meadow land were conducted at three centres. Lectures were given at several centres in the county explanatory of the results of these experiments. 25689

L

[ocr errors]

1

162

AGRICULTURAL INSTRUCTION PROVIDED BY COUNTY

4

Experimental Farm.—There is a farm of about 100 acres attached to the College, and the work on it is conducted for the benefit of the county.

Dairying.There is a small dairy on the farm, and regular instruction in butter-making is given to the students.

Poultry Keeping.–Lectures are given and practical work is carried out in this subject at the College. Lectures are also given throughout the county, and visits of inspection paid to poultry runs, and advice given. Courses of five lectures each were given at 12 centres to an average attendance of 68. It is interesting to note the way in which cottagers and others who can only keep a small head of poultry, are taking up this subject, fowls being kept where one would least expect to find them. Coops, and small houses, are made out of any available waste materials, but though only of rough workmanship they serve their purpose well, and the owners of the fowls evidently make a very appreciable increase to their incomes by means of them.

Bee Keeping.--Instruction is given in this subject by means of lectures and practical work at the College and farm.

Farm Hygiene.-Lectures were given in this subject at the College.

Farriery.

Manual Processes.—Instruction is given in certain manual processes as part of the training of the students at the farm.

Horticulture.-Instruction is given in this subject by means of lectures and practical work at the College and the College fruit station. Lectures and practical deinonstrations are also given at various centres in the county. A course of five lectures was given at each of 11 centres to an average attendance of 40. This instruction, especially in its fruit-growing aspect, is now attracting attention amongst the farmers in the county, and many are likely to take it up seriously. Indeed every farmers' club in the county, with scarcely an exception, has asked for lectures on fruit growing.

School or other Gardens.

Fruit-growing Stations.—There are six such stations in the county, all of which are devoted to experimental and demonstrational fruit culture. One of these stations is situated at the College farm, is well laid out, and is used partly as a training ground for the students at the College and partly as a demonstration area for local fruit growers. The other five, each onequarter of an acre in extent, have been established in different parts of the county. They are planted mainly with apples (standards and bush), but with some pears, and with small fruit in between where possible. The aim, as much as possible, is to show fruit growers what varieties are suitable and what unsuitable for their particular district.

Training of Elementary School Teachers,

[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

L 2

[blocks in formation]

Experimental Farm.

Dairying.-A fixed school is maintained by the county during the summer season, and three courses of eight weeks, each were conducted. An average of ten pupils attended each course

. The county also maintains an itinerant school which gives instruction in butter-making. The school visited five centres and gave six courses of ten to eleven days' instruction. Two courses were given at one of the centres. The total attendance was 415, and 46 students altogether took the full course. This itinerant school acts as an excellent feeder for the fixed school.

Poultry Keeping.- A course of four lectures was given at each of seven centres to an average attendance of 26. Demonstrations were also given, and at each centre a number of farms and cottages were visited, the poultry and accommodation inspected, and advice given.

Bee Keeping.-Bee-driving demonstrations were given at nine centres to an average attendance of 200. In addition, four lectures were given at one centre, and two lectures at another centre to an average attendance of 44. The bee demonstrations at all nice centres were exceedingly well attended, and the interest in bees and bee culture in the county, which is aroused by these demonstrations, seems to increase every year.

Farm Hygiene.
Farriery.-
Manual Processes.

Horticulture.-Lectures were given at 23 centres. At one centre 21 lectures were given, at another 14, at another 13, at six others six each, at ten others four each, at one other five, at another three, while at two other centres single lectures were given. The average attendance at all these lectures was 23.

In addition, 70 visits were paid to private gardens and allotments, and advice given.

School or other Gardens.—There were 13 gardens attached to Elementary Day schools in this county. One was worked on the collective plot system and all the others on the individual plot system. The total number of pupils who received instruction was 151, of whom 28 worked on the collective plot. There were alsó 16 Evening school gardens at which 168 pupils received instruction.

Fruit-growing Stations.--There is a fruit-growing station in this county, 14 acres in extent. Apples, all with three exceptions on the broad-leaved paradise stock, are grown at 12 feet apart, while small fruit (gooseberries and currants) are grown in between. variety of experiments on pruning will be made here.

Training of Elementary School Teachers. There were bursaries awarded to enable teachers to attend various Saturday classes in the county; six of these teachers attended a class in horticulture,

« PreviousContinue »