Collision Course: The Strange Convergence of Affirmative Action and Immigration Policy in America

Front Cover
OUP USA, Sep 11, 2003 - History - 246 pages
When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965 were passed, they were seen as triumphs of liberal reform. Yet today affirmative action is foundering in the great waves of immigration from Asia and Latin America, leading to direct competition for jobs, housing, education, and government preference programs. In Collision Course, Hugh Davis Graham explains how two such well-intended laws came into conflict with each other when employers, acting under affirmative action plans, hired millions of new immigrants ushered in by the Immigration Act, while leaving high unemployment among inner-city blacks. He shows how affirmative action for immigrants stirred wide resentment and drew new attention to policy contradictions. Graham sees a troubled future for both programs. As the economy weakens and antiterrorist border controls tighten, the competition for jobs will intensify pressure on affirmative action and invite new restrictions on immigration. Graham's insightful interpretation of the unintended consequences of these policies is original and controversial.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Civil Rights Reform in the 1960s
13
Immigration Reform in the 1960s
35
Origins and Development of RaceConscious Affirmative Action
65
The Return of Mass Immigration
93
The Strange Convergence of Affirmative Action and Immigration Policy
131
Conclusion
165
Notes
201
Index
229
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)


The late Hugh Davis Graham was Holland N. McTyeire Professor of History and Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. An authority on contemporary political issues, he authored several books, including Civil Rights and the Presidency (OUP).