History of England, from the Roman invasion to the accession of Queen Victoria i

Front Cover
F. Orr & Sons, 1837 - 297 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 166 - second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of " the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between " king and people — and, by the advice of Jesuits and other " wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, " and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom — has " abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby
Page 73 - Had I but served God as diligently as I have served the king, He would not have given me over in my grey hairs.
Page 134 - There is, sir, but one stage more, which though turbulent and troublesome, is yet a very short one. Consider, it will soon carry you a great way; it will carry you from earth to heaven; and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory." "I go," replied the king, "from a corruptible to an incorruptible crown; where no disturbance can have place.
Page 67 - The king started a little, and said, " By my faith, my lord, I thank you for your good cheer, but I must not allow my laws to be broken in my sight. My attorney must speak with you.
Page 133 - Mark, child, what I say. They will cut off my head, and perhaps make thee a King. But mark what I say, you must not be a King, so long as your brothers Charles and James do live; for they will cut off your brothers' heads (when they can catch them) and cut off thy head too at the last; and therefore I charge you, do not be made a king by them.
Page 77 - In this law, the doctrine of the real presence was established, the communion in one kind, the perpetual obligation of vows of chastity, the utility of private masses, the celibacy of the clergy, and the necessity of auricular confession. The denial of the first article...
Page 131 - He has more wit than to be here. When the charge was read against the king, In the name of the people of England; the same voice exclaimed, Not a tenth part of them.
Page 102 - English ; and the latter soon found, that even in close fight the size of the Spanish ships was no advantage to them. Their bulk exposed them the more to the fire of the enemy ; while their cannon, placed too high, shot over the heads of the English. The alarm having now reached the coast of England, the nobility and gentry hastened out with their vessels from every harbour, and reinforced the admiral.
Page 92 - Be of good cheer, brother," cried he, " we shall this day kindle such a torch in England, as I trust in God shall never be extinguished.
Page 139 - For shame," said he to the parliament, "get you gone: give place to honester men; to those who will more faithfully discharge their trust. You are no longer a parliament. I tell you, you are no longer a parliament. The Lord has done with you: he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work.

Bibliographic information