Railway Guide with Popular Routes for Summer and Winter Tourists

Front Cover
Effie Webster, A. T. Sears
A. T. Sears & E. Webster, 1879 - Railroad travel - 188 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 118 - I need scarcely say I was astonished and delighted. So were others, including some judges of our group, who witnessed the experiments and verified with their own ears the electric transmission of speech. This, perhaps the greatest marvel hitherto achieved by the electric telegraph, has been obtained by appliances of quite a homespun and rudimentary character. With somewhat more advanced plans and more powerful apparatus, we may confidently expect that Mr. Bell will give us the means of making voice...
Page 90 - ... a public highway, for the use of the government of the United States, free from toll or other charge upon the transportation of any property or troops of the United States.
Page 30 - No enjoyment, however inconsiderable, is confined to the present moment. A man is the happier for life, from having made once an agreeable tour, or lived for any length of time with pleasant people, or enjoyed any considerable interval of innocent pleasure...
Page 81 - BAY is noted as having been one of the first settlements made by white men. Here the banner of the Cross was first erected, and here the first mass said, in the territory now included within the limits of the State of Wisconsin. The city is surrounded on all sides but one by water ; lying on the point of land at the confluence of the Fox and East Rivers, and about a mile from the mouth of the former. Both of these rivers are navigable for steamers, the Fox River being navigable for the largest class...
Page 118 - ... could, however, be reproduced with the greatest accuracy. The next important step in the progress of invention was obviously the discovery of some means whereby the proper amplitude of each vibration, or succession of vibrations, either simple or compound, could be correctly reproduced by means of the electric current ; and, when this was once done, the general problem of harmonic telegraphy may be said to have been solved. This having been accomplished, it was not difficult to foresee that two...
Page 118 - ... under the influence of stronger vibrations at the transmitting station. The form of the vibrations was of course altogether lost. Any simple musical tone, consisting of a regular succession of uniform vibrations, or any series of such tones, could, however, be reproduced with the greatest accuracy. The next important step in the progress of invention was obviously the discovery of some means whereby the proper amplitude of each vibration, or succession of vibrations, either simple or compound,...
Page 81 - It is well supplied with excellent hotels and large summer hoarding houses, where comfortable rooms and board can be procured at reasonable prices. The city is beautifully located on the Bay of Marquette, which is a deep indentation of the shores of the lake. The town is well built, its streets wide, clean, and well paved.
Page 73 - Lake Superior & Mississippi Railroad, The line of this road is from St. Paul, the head of navigation on the Mississippi River, to the head of Lake Superior, a distance of 140 miles. It connects at St. Paul with each of the long lines of railroad traversing the vast and fertile regions of Minnesota in all directions, and converging at St. Paul, It connects the commerce and business of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers, the...
Page 69 - N of steamers, runs nearly diagonally through the territory to Fort Benton, Montana, and has opened to settlement a large part of the best country both in Dakota and Northern Nebraska. This steamboat line furnishes an outlet to the Yellowstone and Upper Missouri. One of the shortest and best routes to the NEW GOLD FIELDS...
Page 118 - ... vibrations do not necessarily produce sound. The vibratory motions proceeding from sounding bodies are usually conducted to the ear through the medium of the atmosphere. Therefore, to produce any given sound, of whatever character, at a distance, it is evidently only necessary to throw the atmosphere at this point into vibrations precisely similar in every respect to those which would be produced by the action of the original source of sound, whatever it may be. It is found that all the characteristics...

Bibliographic information