Restoration of American Shipping and Defence of Our Harbors, Ocean and Lake

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent to which it has been pushed by this recent people — a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Page 40 - That no goods, wares, or merchandise, unless in cases provided for by treaty, shall be imported into the United States from any foreign port or place, except in vessels of the United States, or in such foreign vessels as truly and wholly belong to the citizens or subjects of that country of which the goods are the growth, production, or manufacture, or from which such goods, wares, or merchandise can only be, or most usually are, first shipped for transportation.
Page 37 - For this purpose, it further enacted, that no goods of the growth, production, or manufacture of any country in Europe should be imported into Great Britain except in British ships, or in such ships as were the real property of the people of the country or place in which the goods were produced, or from which they could only be, or most usually were, exported.
Page 8 - Her Majesty recommends to the consideration of parliament, the laws which regulate the navigation of the United Kingdom, with a view to ascertain whether any changes can be adopted, which, without danger to our maritime strength, may promote the commercial and colonial interests of the empire.
Page 7 - Should Her Majesty's Government entertain similar views, the undersigned is prepared, on the part of the American Government, to propose that British ships may trade from any port of the world to any port in the United States, and be received, protected, and in respect to charges and duties...
Page 32 - The objects which appear to have led to the formation of these contracts, and to the larger expenditure involved, were to afford us rapid, frequent, and punctual communication with distant ports which feed the main arteries of British commerce, and with the most important of our foreign possessions, to foster maritime enterprise, and to encourage the production of a superior class of vessels which would promote the convenience and wealth of the country in time of peace, and assist in defending its...
Page 32 - ... with distant ports which feed the main arteries of British commerce, and with the most important of our foreign possessions, to foster maritime enterprise, and to encourage the production of a superior class of vessels, which would promote the convenience of the country in time of peace and assist in defending its shores against hostile aggressions. These subsidized British" steam lines— about thirty in number — belt the world everywhere, running to foreign as well as to colonial markets.
Page 4 - No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries. No climate that is not witness to their toils. Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of...
Page 3 - ... husbandry, and perhaps French, is generally apprenticed to some respectable merchant in whose counting-house he remains two or three years, or at least until he becomes familiar with exchanges and such other commercial matters as may qualify him to represent his principal in foreign countries.
Page 33 - We are ready to do anything you like : if you can do but little, we must do little; if you can do much, we will do much ; if you shall do all, we shall do all.

Bibliographic information