Phytohormones in Soils Microbial Production & Function

Front Cover
CRC Press, Mar 21, 1995 - Technology & Engineering - 520 pages
Details the various physiological responses in plants caused by microbially derived phytohormones--examining the microbial synthesis of the five primary classes of plant hormones. Exploring novel methods for improving symbiotic associations vital for plant growth and development.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface iv
1
Precursorinoculum interactions
9
References
10
Auxins
17
Physiology of auxins in plants
20
Biosynthesis and metabolism
21
Metabolism of endogenous auxins
25
Mechanism of action
28
Cytokinins and pathogenesis
269
Cytokinins in soil
275
Physiological effects of microbial cytokinins on plant growth
278
Conclusions
280
References
281
Ethylene
301
History
302
Ethylene in plant physiology
304

Auxin transport
30
Uptake and metabolism of exogenous auxin in roots
31
Microbial biosynthesis of auxins
35
Pathogenesis
71
Biochemistry of auxin metabolism by microorganisms
76
Auxin metabolism in soil
85
Response of plant growth to auxins of microbial origin
94
Conclusions
103
Gibberellins
137
History
150
Biosynthesis and metabolism
158
Binding sites
178
Translocation in plants
179
Effects of exogenously applied gibberellins on plant growth
180
Gibberellins in pathogenesis
196
Environmental factors affecting gibberellin biosynthesis by Gibberella fujikuroi
198
Gibberellins in soil
200
Physiological effects of microbial gibberellins on plant growth
201
Conclusions
205
Cytokinins
227
Cytokinins in plant physiology
232
Biosynthesis and metabolism
233
Cytokininbinding sites
240
Translocation in plants
241
Microbial production of cytokinins
248
Biosynthesis and metabolism in plants
307
Binding sites
313
Mechanism of action
314
Effects of exogenously applied ethylene on plant growth
315
Ethylene in symbiotic associations
346
Ethylene in pathogenesis
352
Factors affecting microbial biosynthesis of ethylene
363
Ethylene accumulation in soil
378
Factors affecting ethylene accumulation in soil
381
Physiological significance of soil ethylene
405
Conclusions
410
Abscisic Acid
437
The role of abscisic acid in plant physiology
438
Biosynthesis and metabolism in plants
440
Binding sites
445
Mechanism of action
446
Transport
447
Microbial production
452
Abscisic acid and symbiotic associations
470
Abscisic acid and pathogenesis
474
Abscisic acid in soil
477
Ecological significance of microbially derived abscisic acid
479
References
480
Index
493
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1995)

W. T. Frankenberger, Jr. is a Professor of Soil Microbiology and Biochemistry in the Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences at the University of California, Riverside.

Bibliographic information