The universal anthology, a collection of the best literature, with biographical and explanatory notes, ed. by R. Garnett, L. Vallée, A. Brandl. Imperial ed, Volume 11

Front Cover
Richard Garnett
1899
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 247 - Not lighter does the swallow skim Along the smooth lake's level brim : And when Lord Marmion reached his band, He halts, and turns with clenched hand, And shout of loud defiance pours, And shook his gauntlet at the towers. " Horse ! horse ! " the Douglas cried, " and chase I * But soon he reined his fury's pace : " A royal messenger he came, Though most unworthy of the name.
Page 253 - O woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made ; When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou ! — Scarce were the piteous accents said, When, with the Baron's casque, the maid To the nigh streamlet ran; Forgot were hatred, wrongs, and fears ; The plaintive voice alone she hears, Sees but the dying man.
Page 245 - He had safe conduct for his band, Beneath the royal seal and hand, And Douglas gave a guide : The ancient Earl, with. stately grace, Would Clara on her palfrey place, And whispered, in an under tone, " Let the hawk stoop, his prey is flown.
Page 253 - Tunstall lies dead upon the field, His life-blood stains the spotless shield: Edmund is down; my life is reft; The Admiral alone is left, Let Stanley charge with spur of fire—- With Chester charge, and Lancashire, Full upon Scotland's central host, Or victory and England's lost. Must I bid twice? hence, varlets! fly! Leave Marmion here alone — to die.
Page 253 - Is there none, Of all my halls have nursed, Page, squire, or groom, one cup to bring Of blessed water from the spring, To slake my dying thirst ! " 0 woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made ; When pain and anguish wring the brow A ministering angel thou...
Page 248 - Bruce, to rule the fight, And cry — "Saint Andrew and our right ! " Another sight had seen that morn, From Fate's dark book a leaf been torn, And Flodden had been Bannockbourne...
Page 163 - Besides a quantity of fresh weeds, such as grow in rivers, they saw a green fish of a kind which keeps about rocks ; then a branch of thorn with berries on it, and recently separated from the tree, floated by them ; then they picked up a reed, a small board, and, above all, a staff artificially carved. All gloom and mutiny now gave way to sanguine expectation ; and throughout the day each one was eagerly on the watch, in hopes of being the first to discover the long-sought-for land.
Page 125 - Was walking on the sand. The first line that Sir Patrick red, A loud lauch lauched he; The next line that Sir Patrick red, The teir blinded his ee.
Page 251 - And Edmund Howard's lion bright, Still bear them bravely in the fight ; Although against them come Of gallant Gordons many a one, And many a stubborn Highlandman, And many a rugged Border clan, With Huntly and with Home. Far on the left, unseen the while, Stanley broke Lennox and Argyle ; Though there the western mountaineer Rushed with bare bosom on the spear, And flung the feeble targe aside, And with both hands the broadsword plied.
Page 252 - Tell him his squadrons up to bring. Fitz-Eustace, to Lord Surrey hie : Tunstall lies dead upon the field, His lifeblood stains the spotless shield ; Edmund is down ; my life is reft ; The Admiral alone is left. Let Stanley charge with spur of fire, — With Chester charge, and Lancashire, Full upon Scotland's central host, Or victory and England's lost.

Bibliographic information