Page images
PDF

JOURNAL. A ril 2 , 18

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

pr

Wiunsirs. Fnanimicri, Coltishiill, Norfolk, Ironmonger
Norwich Pct March 30 Ord April 15

Woasiricrc, Ariaxisoss Jriirirs, Hollinwood, nr Oldlianr,
Builder Oldham Pet April 14 Ord April 14

[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors]

Nirxr in order of importance to the liver, the kidneys play a most important. gut in the internal economy of the excretory organs. T cir functions are solely piu'ifying or excretory, by gletting rid of oflete products contairied in the blood. S ould they from any cause become ineiflcient, the uric acid which should be excreted is retained in the circulatory system, and gives rise to nrinic poisoning -ending fatally. There is no doubt that errors in eating and drinking give rise to all kidney troubles. When the X or Rontgen rays have been turned on to these wonderful organs, the high liver will be able to sec what his excesses have led up to. He will see either the small, slirunlr kidney caused by excessive indulgence in spirituous li |110l‘S, or the large, fatty kidney, degenerating as the result of over-eating and highly-flavoured flesh food, without having taken tho necessary exercise tocounteract fatty formations. These few remarks are mainly duo to the fact —which has been demonstrated beyond the shadow of a doubt-—-ihut Kola, and Hopalin, ii-om Hops,hoth ingredients in Dr. Tihblcs' Vi-Cocoa, exercise a most beneficial effect on the structional tissues of the kidney, and so on its excretory functions.

Dr. Tibbles’ Vi-Cocoa is not in any sense a medicine. It is simply a nourishing beverage, and in that respect it plays n most important part in the prevention ol functional disorders. In these important organs, and others, Kola has a wonderlul facult of giving power to the involuntary muscles 0! tho body. By involuntary we understand those muscles not control ed by tho will — thosc muscles which carry on tho work of life without our cousent, and, unless looked at carefully, in many instances without our knowledge, such as the beating 0 the heart when asleep, the breathing of the llltigfl the action of the kidneys, and the digestive process. ola acts on these in n nourishing and strengthening sense, conserves the strength of these involuntary muscles, prevents imdue waste, and by its beneficial action gives health and vigour to men and women. As people become more intelligent, they see that they sbou d try and prevent disease. It secnis strange, when one comes to consider it, that the etrons of medical science are directed to z'u1'ing, when praventing would seem to be a more rational proceeding.

The unique vitalising fand restorative powcis of Dr. Tibbles’ Vi-Cocoa are being recognised to an extent hitherto unknown in the history of any preparation. Merit -—und merit alone—is what is claimed for Dr. Tibblcs' Vi-Cocou, and the proprietors are prepiired to send to any reader who names the Soi.rci'roiis' ouiiinr. (a postcard will do) a dainty sample tin of Dr. Tibbles‘ Vi-Cocoa. free and pest-paid. _

Dr. Tibbles'Vi-Cocoa can be obtained from all chonnsts, grocers, and stores, or from Dr. Tibblee' Vi-Cocoa, l.imtd., til), 61 8; 62, Bunhil] Row, London, E.C.

[merged small][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

l l

I

LAW FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, 114, Cnsscsnr-Lass, LONDON, A ril 12th. 1898.

NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that the Ki“-\'UA[A Gssnnu. Miirriso of the Shareholders of the Luv Fran lssuaascs Socrnrr will be held at the S-icii:'rr’s House, CHANCERY Lisii,_ on Tunsmiv the 3rd day oi Mir sax-r, to elect ten Directors in the room of the like number of Directors who go out by rotation; to elect four Auditors in the room of the like number who retire ; and for geucml purposes.

The Chair will be taken at One o'clock precisely. The Accounts of the Society, with the Auditors’ Report upon them, may bs inspected by the Shin-.-liolders for 14 days p§'€;'iQl'.;1Sly to the Annual Meeting and during one month 8 1‘ 1 .

The following Direct )l’8 retire by rotation, are eligible, and ofi’er themselves for re-election :—

[ocr errors][merged small]

ST. THOMAS'S HOSPITAL MEDICAL
SCHOOL.
Ai.sxs.'r EMBANXHRNT, S E.

The SUMMER SESSION will COMMENCE on lilioxniiv, Mar 22:0. Students entering in the summer are eligible to compete for the Science Scholarships of £150 and £60 awarded in October.

A Scholarship of £50, open to University students, and other Prizes and Scholarships of the value of £500, are offered for annual competition.

All appointments are open to students without extra payment.

Special Classes for the Examinations of the University of London are held throughout the year.

Tutorial Classes are he d prior to the second and final Examinations of the Conjoint Board in January, April, and July

Aregister of approved lodgings and of private families IEGQIVIDF boarders is kept in Secretary's Oifice.

Excel ent day club accommodation is provided in the school building, and an athletic ground at Chiswick.

Prospectuses and all particulars m'1y be obtained from the Medical Secretary, Mr. G. Rcsnts.

H. P. IIA\VKINS, M.A., M.D., Oxon, Dean.

‘V ANTED, Clerkship in London Oifice

doing Admiralty birsiucss, by Solicitor (January Final, not admitted, rztained where ariicled in City oflicc) ; has given close attention ta ofiice work; moderate salary. gllllddress, NAVIS, Wilkes’ Advertising Ofiloes, 27, Ludga.te

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

A Large Stock of Second-hand Reports and Text-book slwa s on Sale.

[ocr errors]

ORIENT COMPANY’S PLE ASURE
CRUISE by their
Steamship “ LUSITANIA," 3,912 tons register. from
Losoos 15th Jose, LBITII 17th Jose, to the finest l
FIORDS in NORWAY
And the NORTH CAPE (for Midnight Sun),
Arriving back in London llth July.
Other Cruises to follow.
High-class cuisine, string band, electric light, &c.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]

IKCORPORATED LAW SOCIETY. LEGAL EDUCATION.

Classes for Final Students are held at the I-Tall of the Society on four afternoons each week during the following periods: August to January; January to June.

These periods afford five months’ class preparation, and students are advised to subscribe for a full course, and certainly for not less than three months, otherwise the work must necessarily be hurried.

Students may join the classes either before or after the Intermediate Examination without subscribing to the course of Postal instruction, but it is recommended that they should avail themselves of both modes oi iu

Tns Couivcir. invite attention to the following cheme of education, adopted n 1892 with the object of affording assistance to Articled Clerks.

For the benefit of Clerks resident in London or who are able to attend, these classes are held and Tutors give advice and assistance at the Hall of the Law Society.

To those Clerks who are articled at a distance from large towns systematic Instruction with advice and help is given, and a course of preparation through the post has been formulated.

POSTAL INSTRUCTION.

In the case of students who have not passed the Intermediate Examination the instruction is by means of monthly papers, and deals with the selected portions of Stephen s Commentaries.

For those who have passed the Intermediate Examination instruction is afibrded by fortnightly papers, and embraces the following subjects: Equity, Conveyancing, Common Law, Bankruptcy, Criminal and Magisterial Law, Probate, Divorce, Admiralty, and Ecclesiastical Law.

These papers both before and after the Intermediate Examinations are varied each year, so that students who may subscribe for more than one year's tuition receive additional assistance.

These courses may be commenced at any time, but the Tutors recommend that the Intermediate course should be commenced at an early stage of the Articles, and the Final course soon after the Intermediate Examination has been passed.

Books can be obtained from Messrs. Stevens 8: Sons, or other law lending library, for a subscription of a guinea and a-half to cover the course of work for the Final Examination, and Stephen’s Commentaries can be supplied to either Class of Postal Subscribers, at a subscription of one guinea, on application to the Tutor, Dr. West.

CLASS INSTRUCTION.

Class instruction is also provided on the selected portions of Stephen's Commentaries and the subjects above named, and it is recommended that the classes should be joined after the expiration of a course of Postal instruction. Students can join the classes at any time, the fees being proportionate to the length of attendance.

Rooms are provided where subscribers may study, and books are supplied without extra charge.

Periodical test examinations are held by the Tutors.

The Classes for Intermediate Students are held in the Hall of the Society on three afternoons in each week during the following periods: August to November ; October to January ; Janua to April; March to June.

struction.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

Students may subscribe for successive classes.

Law Society's Hall. Chancery-lane.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

post free. Telephone No. 65005.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][merged small]

Authors advised with as to Printing and Publishing.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic]

Telegraphic Address: “BIRKBECK, LONDON." Estimates and all information furnished. BRLQD Q Q0" 1,T1)__ MAYFAIRI W" g MAYPAIR FRANCIS RAVENSOBOPT, Manager. Contracts catered into. WORKS, VAUKEALL, LONDON, 8-W

[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][graphic][merged small][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][graphic][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

A nsroar issued by the Special Committee of the Incorporated Law Society on Money Lending, which has been adopted by the Council, recommends that the following suggestions be made to the Parliamentary Select Committee : (1) That the minimum limit for bills of sale should be raised from £80 to £60, and the interest be limited to 15 per cent. per annum on bills of sale to secure £100 and under, and 10 per cent. above that amount ; (2) the re-enactment of the provisions in the Bills of Sale Act, 1878, that bills of sale should be attested by a. solicitor, with a statement in the attestation that the efiect of the bill has been explained to the grantor by the solicitor; (3) to give a. borrower under a bill of sale power at any time to pay off the amount with interest up to date, together with fourteen days’ interest in lieu of notice; and (4) to empower the High Court and county courts to interfere in cases of oppression or unfair dealing, and to make this relief available without unnecessary publicity.

NATURALLY one of the first matters of interest in the draft Land Transfer Rules is the scale of charges to be allowed to solicitors for their work in connection with the registration of title. For the first registration of freehold or leasehold land with a possossory title (which will, we imagine, be the ordinary proceeding), the solicitor-’s charge is made to vary with the value of the land. If such value does not exceed £1,000, he is to receive the munificent sum of 10s. 6:1. for every £100 or part of £100, no minimum fee being pre

scribed. If the va ue exceeds £1,000, and does not exceed

[graphic]

£20,000, he is to receive £5 5s. for the first £1,000, and £1 ls. for every subsequent £2,000 or part of £2,000. If the value exceeds £20,000 and does not exceed £10,000, he is to receive £15 15s. for the first £20,000, and £1 ls. for every subsequent £4,000 or part of £4,000. And if the value exceeds £40,000, he is to receive £21 for the first £40,000, and £1 1s. for every subsequent £10,000 or part of £10,000, up to a maximum of £26 5s. Now let us see what the solicitor has to do for this remuneration. This is prescribed by rule 17. He is to prepare and deliver at the registry a written application, signed by him or his client, in a form given in the first schedule, either accompanied by a plan or containing particulars sufficient to enable the land to be “fully identified’ on the ordnance map, and, if a particular verbal description is desired to be entered on the register, stating such description. He is also to prepare and deliver at the registry a statutory declaration by the applicant or his solicitor, in a form contained in the first schedule, stating (where made by the applicant) that the declarant is in possession or receipt of the rents and profits of land shown on the plan annexed as an exhibit or described in the verbal description to be entered on the register, and that he is entitled thereto in fee simple for his own benefit, or otherwise, as the case may be; and that the value of the land does not, to the best of his belief, exceed a sum to be specified. And if the application is for registration in the name of a nominee, or is made by a purchaser, the consent in writing of the nominee, or of the vendor or his solicitor, must be prepared by the solicitor and left with the application. If any deed or document of title is delivered with the application, it will be marked with notice of the registration and the number of the title, and if returned to the applicant, a copy or abstract of it for filing must be prepared by the solicitor and furnished to the oflice if required. Then the entries and plan will have to be settled and the land certificate prepared by the oflice and considered by the solicitor, and either handed to the applicant or deposited at the registry. Here we have, in the simplest case, the preparation by the solicitor of an application, probably of a plan, and of a statutory declaration, probably with a plan exhibited thereto, and of a consent by the vendor. Then there are attendances to deliver these documents at the ofiice, attendances to settle same, and attendance to receive the land certificate. In matters of difficulty no forecast can be made of the time and trouble which may be involved. For this a purchaser’s solicitor, on a purchase for £1,000, is to receive £5 5s.

On run rmsr registration of land with an absolute or qualified title, the remuneration of the solicitor is also to vary with the value of the land. For the first £1,000 in value he is to receive £1 10s. per £100, for the second and third £1,000, £1 per £100 ; for the fourth and each subsequent £1,000 up to £10,000, 10s. per £100; and for each subsequent £1,000 up to £100,000, 5s. per £1,000. There is to be a minimum charge of £3 where the value is under £100, and of £5 where the value is £100 or over, and fractions of £100 under £50 are to be reckoned as £50, and fractions of £100 above £50 are to be reckoned as £100. The work to be done by the solicitor in the case of registration with an absolute or qualified title will, we assume, be that now done by the purchaser’s solicitor, except preparation of the conveyance, but plus all the requirements of the rules, which are much too lengthy and complicated to be summarized here; and for a purchase of £1,000 he will receive the present scale remuneration of £15; while on a purchase for £5,000 he will receive the scale fee of £45 now payable to the purchaser’s solicitor. That is to say, the solicitor is in these cases to receive nothing for the extra work involved in obtaining registration ; the object being, no doubt, to enable the ofiice to say to purchasers “ You can get an absolute or qualified title for a less fee to your solicitor than you will have to pay if you take a conveyance in the usual way, and register with a possessory title.” And (see rule 261 (d)) this remuneration is not to apply at all “ when the title has been deduced or investigated by such solicitor on the occasion of a recent sale, purchase, or mortgage.” In the case of completed transfers, charges, exchanges, and partitions of land (whether registered with an absolute, qualified, or possessory title), or of a registered charge where no title outside the regiater it investigated, the remuneration of the solicitor is to be

[graphic]

that prescribed for the first registration of land. So that, of course, when property is once registered with an absolute or qualified title, the solicitor’s fees on any subsequent dealing therewith are cut down to the bare sums mentioned above in relation to first registration. There are many other matters to be noticed in the rules relating to ' solicitor’s remuneration, but the above may sufiice for the present week.

Ar run Old Bailey this week a point of law on the construc

tion of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1885, was raised, which is new and of very great importance. Section 3 (2) of that Act provides that any person who “by false pretences or false representations procures any woman or girl, not being a common prostitute or of known immoral character, to have any unlawful carnal connection ” shall be guilty of a misdemeanour. The prisoner in the case referred to was indicted under this section for having procured a certain woman to have unlawful connection with himself by falsely pretending that he was an unmarried man, and that he was able and willing to marry her. A motion was made to quash the indictment on the grounds that, on the face of it, no offence was disclosed, and in support of the motion it was argued that “ procure ” in the section means “induce to have connection with some person other than the person procuring.” In support of the indictment, it was said that the word merely means to obtain, cause, or bring about, and that the section must be interpreted literally, giving to the word “ procure ” its ordinary meaning. The dictionaries state that the word has a secondary signification—that is, to obtain for the purpose of gratifying another’s lust, and is allied in meaning with “pimp” and “pander.” The word “procuress” has a well-established meaning, and is seldom, if ever, used in any but this evil sense. It seems highly probable also, when we remember the nature of the agitation out of which the Act grew, that Parliament had this secondary sense in mind in each place in which the word “ procure” is used. On the other hand, section 2 (I) provides that any person shall be guilty of a misdemeanour who “ procures any girl or woman under twenty-one years of age . . . to have unlawful carnal connection . . . with any other person or persons,” while in section 3 these last words are omitted. Further, there is a decision of the Court cf Grown Cases Reserved in the case of Reg. v. Jones (44 W. R. 110; 1896, 1 Q. B. 4), on section 11, which is entitled to consideration. Section 11 provides that any male person shall be guilty of a misdemeanour who “ procures the commission by any male person of any act of gross indecency with another male person.” Here the court held that “another male person ” may be the erson who procures; and the Recorder of London on the strength of this decision felt himself bound to uphold the indictment in the recent case. He could hardly do otherwise under the circumstances, but probably a case may yet be stated for the superior court. The decision in Reg. v. Jon-cs on this point is, however, by no means satisfactory, as no counsel appeared in the case, and it is to be hoped that this important point will be authoritatively settled. If it becomes generally known that any man who seduces a woman under false pretences is liable to be indicted and to be imprisoned for two years, there will probably be a large number of prosecutions for the ofience, as it is a very common one. We are far from saying that such persons do not deserve punishment, but at the same time it is to be remembered that when once it is recognized that a man who seduces a woman, say under false pretences as to his means, may be punished criminally, a very powerful weapon will be put in the hands of unscrupulous and designing women.

Tm: PROMINENT feature in the Queen’s Proclamation Of Neutrality is the recital of the rules annexed to Article VI. Of the Treaty of Washington and of the Foreign Enlistment Act» 1870. The Act is a matter of municipal provision, and lays down the principles for preserving neutrality which the Government of Great Britain will enforce against British subjects. The rules are a matter of international provision, and declare tllfl principles which ought to secure the observance of neutrality by either Great Britain or the United States in cases where the other party is engaged in hostilities. In the matter of munici

« PreviousContinue »