Page images
PDF
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Rownszws, Riclrsiin WILLIAMS, Bangor, Carnarvon Mayfi Thornton Jones, Bangor

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Amended notice substituted for that published in the -' London Gazette of April 1 : '

Slsnross, Cnsnuzs EDWARD, Balssll Heath, Worcesters, _ gs-sFitter Birmingham Pet March 29 Ord March

FIRST MEETINGS.

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

ADJ UDICATIONS.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Apri 6 Winrsnial, -Inns Hssnr, Mountain Ash, Glam, Fruiterer Aberdare Pet April 4 Ord April 5

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][graphic]

All letters intended for publication in the “Solicitoi-.i’ Journal” must be authenticated by the name of the writer.

Subscription, PAYABLE IN ADVANCE, which includes Indexes, Digests, Statutes, and Postage, 52s. WEEKLY REPORTER, in wrapper, 26s. ; lry Post, 28s. Somcrrons’ Jouiuui, 26s.; by Post, 28s. Volumes bound at the oflic¢—cloth, 2.9. 9d., half law cal/', 5?. 6d.

[graphic][merged small]

Lung troubles in the British Isles are more common than any ot er diseases. Simple catarrhs or calds lead to bronchitis nndinflamination of t-he lungs. In addition to these minor troubles the lungs are subject to diseases due to germs such as consumption. \Vhen at a mean sea level the oxygen is Eleni iful, all the breathing capacity of the lungs is not use ; but ascend, say. smile above sea level, and all the lung substance is cilled into plug. That is how consumptives are sent to places a mile an more above sea level, where they are benefited and sometimes cured. Pneumonia is another disease due to germs. More care is required in cold, damp weather to lie? them free from trouble than any other organs of our bo y. The zfiiliestion of purc air is a vital one, and exercise inall wea em in the open air is of the utmost importance. But over and above all is the absolute neceaoity for keeping the body in robust health. Ree how quickly a weakly, nnmznic person catches cold, and how soon itlfliesto the lungs.

Dr. Tibbles‘ Vi-Coma, with its pure Csrac.i_s Cocoa, Kola, Extract of Malt, and Extract of Hops, is not n medicine, but imparts nourishment, and comes to the rescue by building up strength and vigour.

Mothers who wou d keep their children in [mud health should give them morning and evening Dr. Tibbles’ Vi( ‘ocnr made with hot milk. Delicate men and women who have weak lungs, to be hale, robust, and healthy, should use Dr. Tibb es‘ Vi-Cocoa morning and evening‘, and all men who have to be exposed t) the bleu uncertainty of our trying climate should fmtify themselves before they face their dailg toil with Dr. 'l‘ibbles' Vi-Cocoa, and they can then rave the fury of the elementi with equanimity. The writer speaks from personal experience and from observations of beneficial effects on others. Ten opens the pores and temporarily excites, coflee stimulates the action of the heart whilst Dr. Tihbles' Vi-Cocoa gives trength, stninina, and builds up and strengthens the ung tissues. It is indccd ii wonderful food beverage. Nothing his ever been discovered that can approach it in giving lightness of he.ii"t, joy of life,_fleetness of foot, an that general feelinglof comfort which only comes from a full capacity to enioy every pk asure. moral, intellectual, ll.DfI£I1)'!lCltl. _

Dr. Tibblea' Vi-Cocoa can be Oblifl-IIIQ‘ from all chemists, grocers, and stores, or from Dr. Tibbles Vi-Cocoa, Limited, 60 61, and 62, Bunhill-row, London, E.C.

lllerit, and merit algne, is what wed claim gar DI‘. Tibbles’ Vi-Cocoa, an we are prepare to sen toan ' reader (a postcard will do) who names the Sonicirossl JOURNAL a diiinty sample tin of Dr. Tibbles' Vi-Cocoa.

[merged small][merged small][graphic]
[graphic]

BRITISH COLUMB IA—-YUKON.—MARTIN & LANGLEY, Solicitors. 59, Governmentstreet, Victoria, B.C., Canada; cable address “ Marlang."

ACCIDENTS caused by Collision, the Falling, Boltinz or Kicking of Horses, or by being Run into by otherfllehicles.

Policies issued for the Year or Season only. Prospectuses

IOARRIAGES INSURED AGAINST post-free.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small]

And all General and Commercial WorkE very description of Pr/'n!lng~—-/urge or small.

[graphic]

Printer? of THE SOLICITORS‘ JOURNAL Newslllber.

[graphic]

Authors advised with as to Printing and Publishing. Estimates and all information furnished.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

beg respectfully to announce that they DALS AFPIYRATELY APPBAISE EVVELS and SILVER. PLATE, &c., for the LEGAL Psorsssios or i-uiiciiilss the saris for cash if desired. Established 1772

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][merged small]
[ocr errors]

M,-_ J_ w_ grimy hm 5 1,“-39 Egmgs Agency, sud gives VALUATIONS for ESTATE DUTY A DILAPIDATIONS. special attention to this brancn of the Business.

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small]
[graphic]
[graphic]

CURRENT TOPICS.

Wn PRINT elsewhere new rules under the Solicitors Act, 1888, which enable evidence in proceedings before the Discipline Committee to be taken in certain cases by afli-iavit. At present the practice is for all evidence to be taken by oral examination, although aflidavit evidence is allowed to be used when the report of the committee is brought before the court. It is now provided that in any case in which the solicitor does not appear and the committee determine to proceed in his absence, and in any other case with the consent in writing of the solicitor, the committee may, either as to the whole case or as to any particular facts, receive evidence given by affidavit. For this purpose the aifidavit upon which the application is made will be available. Considering the nature of the charges which come before the committee and the importance of requiring strict proof, it is clear that this power of taking evidence by affidavit will have to he used with caution. It is to be observed, however, that the committee can only proceed in the absence oi the solicitor if, having regard to all the circumstances of the case, they are of opinion that such absence is the result of gross negligence or of an intention to avoid or delay proceedings.

Tun APPEAL list for the Easter Sittings contains 187 appeals, oi which 44 are from the Chancery Division, 6 from the Probate, &c., Division, 119 from the Queeu’s Bench Division; and there are also 4 appeals in bankruptcy and 14 cases in the New Trial Paper. This is aconsiderable advance from the last sittings, at the commencement oi which there were 165 appeals, and a still greater increase on the number a year ago, when there were only 85 appeals.

Tm: Ltsrs of the Chancery Division show some reduction, no doubt due to the assistance rendered in the trial of witness actions during the last sittings oi the judges oi the Probate, &c., Division. There are 205 matters before Nonrrr, J., 174 before Snnnmo, J., 84 before Knrmwrcn, J. (this learned judge always manages to keep down his lists, and his

[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

Tm: Goimon. of the Incorporated Law Society are continuing the work which they have recently undertaken of furnishing the members of the society with manuals likely to be of service to them. They propose to follow their recent issue of the “ Handbook to the Incorporated Law Society ” with a book of 120 pages, containing a selection of cases afiecting solicitors, including cases reported up to the end of Trinity_Term, 1§96. The digest is divided into headings dealing with retamer and authorities, duties, privileges, general lien, particular lien, solicitor-trustees, dealings between solicitor and client, partnershi authorities, agency, and solicitor and client costs; and under each of these headings the results of the leading decisions will be found stated. At the close of the work there is a summary, stating shortly the results of the decisions and containing references to them; constituting, in fact, a sort of code. The book is likely to be found extremely useful in every solicitor’s ofiice.

Ir WILL BI-I same from the report of the annual meeting of the Associated Provincial Law Societies, which we print elsewhere, that negotiations are in progress for the introduction into the Finance Bill of the present year of a clause relative to an indemnity being given in respect of the stamps on partial releases of mortgages upon a transfer, and conveyances subject to apportioned chief rents, which have not been stamped in accordance with the interpretation now put by the Inland Revenue authorities on the Stamp Act. It will be remembered that, as regards such deeds which were executed before this novel interpretation was made known, the authorities, by their circular of the 20th of February, 1895, admitted that it would “ not be equitable ” to require that such deeds should be adjudicated upon otherwise than in accordance with the practice prevailing at the date of their being stamped, and they intimated that if any stamp question was thereafter raised in reference to such deeds executed on or before the 3 lst of December, 1894, they would be prepared, without payment of further duty, to place the adjudication stamp on such deeds. The report of the recent meeting does not state whether the proposed statutory indemnity is simply intended to save the trouble of adj udioation of the deeds referred to in the above-mentioned circular, or whether it is to cover deeds executed up to a later date.

[ocr errors]

A NOTICEABLE feature of the changes necessitated by the

Eesent condition of agricultural land is the adoption by the clesiastical Commissioners, in the case of a sale by auction of a farm of 622 acres in \Viltshire, of a somewhat similar system of payment of purchase-money by instalments to that which has long been in vogue with regard to building land. Their scheme, as stated by the auctioneer, is the payment by the purchaser of 15 per cent. of the purchase-money on the signing of the contract; the balance of the purchase-money and interest being paid by 70 half-yearly payments, so that in 35 years the purchaser (or his successor in title) will become owner. We presume that the purchaser is to be at liberty to anticipate the instalments at a discount, but the length of time over which they extend—a whole generation—would seem likely to raise difficulties both in connection with the outstanding legal estate, and generally in dealings with the land by the purchaser. The former matter is of course less important in the case of a corporation, and it is probable that in working out the scheme the

[graphic]

latter matters have been provided for. It has often struck us that a somewhat modified arrangement would produce a better market for agricultural property than now exists, and we should be glad to hear from any of our readers whether the experiment has been tried by any private owner.

Tun APPROACH of war between the United States and Spaina war which must he largely of a maritime character———has led to much speculation as to the extent to which the belligerents will claim or will he allowed to exercise the right of capturing enemy’s goods in neutral vessels. There is no doubt about the proposition that all capture of enemy’s goods within the actual territory of a neutral State is absolutely forbidden, and it might have been supposed that neutral ships, wherever found, would have come within the protection of the rule. But in fact it has been extended only to the public vessels of a neutral State, and over these neither the right of visitation and search, of ca ture, nor any other belligerent right can be exercised on the high seas (Wheaton’s International Law, 3rd English edition, p. 597). Private ships, however, are regarded as no part of the territory of the State to which the owners belong, and the constant usage of belligerent nations from the earliest times has subjected enemy’s goods in neutral vessels to capture and condemnation as prize of war. Sometimes, indeed, special ordinances have extended this liability to the ship in which the enemy’s goods are carried. This course was taken by Louis XIV. in his marine ordinance of 1681, and all vessels laden with enemy’s goods were declared lawful prize of war; and for some time after that date this rule appears to have been applied both in France and Spain. The further rule that the goods of a neutral in an enemy’s ship are liable to seizure is no part of international law, though of course the presence there of the goods raises a presumption that they are enemy’s property, which it lies on the owner to rebut. Here again, however, the special laws of particular States have gone beyond the law of nations, and the ordinance of Louis XlV., already referred to, confirmed the earlier French rule, which had been for a time abandoned, that the goods of a friend, laden on board the ships of an enemy, are lawful prize.

Tim moonvsmnncn of the rule under which enemy’s goods are liable to seizure in neutral ships is so great that ever since the seventeenth century efiorts have been made to abrogate it and to substitute the rule “ free ships, free goods." The latter rule was incorporated into numerous treaties, and often in conjunction with the counter rule enemy ships, enemy goods." As already explained, the latter rule isas much behind the principle of international law as the former rule is in advance of it, and there is no necessary connection between the two. Upon the occasion of the “ Armed Neutrality” of 1780, and again in 1800, the Baltic Powers declared in favour of “ free ships, free goods,” without associating the objectionable rule that enemy ships make enemy goods; but the declaration obtained no support from Great Britain. The Napoleonic wars were of such a nature as to embitter the Powers against France, and they witnessed a falling away in the matter under consideration from the enlightened views which were beginning to prevail. So far as regards Great Britain and the United States, the general policy of the former was to maintain the ancient law of maritime capture, and of the latter to favour the more modern doctrine of letting the neutral flag give protection to all goods over which it flew. In the course of the present century the controversy has been closed for nearly all States by the second and third articles of the Declaration of 1-‘aris. There are : (2) The neutral flag covers enemy’s goods with the exception of contraband of war; and (3) neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under the enemy’s flag. This is an adoption, therefore, subject to the exception of contraband of war, of the rule, “free ships, free goods,” without the correlative rule, “enemy ships, enemy goods.” As we observed last week, the United States desired upon this point to go further than the Declaration, and they would have withdrawn their objection to the prohibition of privateering contained in the first article had the other Powers

een willing to exempt from seizure all private property except

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »