Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

The recommendation of the secretary to purchase more type for the purpose of printing a library catalogue is concurred in, and also the employment of a civilian printer.

The recommendation that the compensation of the assistant to the secretary (Alfred Robertson) be increased to $1,200 per annum is renewed. Very respectfully,

ROBERT N. GETTY,

Captain, First Infantry, Commandant United States Infantry and Cavalry School.

UNITED STATES INFANTRY AND CAVALRY SCHOOL,

Fort Leavenworth, Kans., June 30, 1900. The COMMANDANT UNITED STATES INFANTRY AND CAVALRY School,

Fort Leavenworth, Kans. Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith my report as secretary and disbursing officer of the United States Infantry and Cavalry School for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900.

During the past year the following changes have been made in the personnel:

From

TO

Maj.J.A. Augur, Fourth Cavalry, commandant....
Capt. W. B. Reynolds, Fourteenth Infantry, commandant.
Capt. G. H. Sands, Sixth Cavalry, commandant
Capt. R. B. Paddock, Sixth Cavalry, commandant.
Capt. E. E. Benjamin, First Infantry, commandant
Capt. Robert W. Getty, First Infantry, commandant
Capt. W. B. Reynolds, Fourteenth Infantry, secretary
First Lieut. G. C. Barnhardt, Sixth Cavalry, secretary
First Lieut. J.N. Pickering, First Infantry, secretary.

June 29, 1899 June 29, 1899 July 13, 1899 July 13, 1899 Aug. 17, 1899 Aug. 17, 1899 Sept. 22, 1899 Sept. 22, 1899 Oct. 13, 1899 Oct. 13, 1899

June 30, 1899 June 30, 1899 June 19, 1900 June 19, 1900

During the year 212 works have been purchased for the library, a number of books and pamphlets have been bound or rebound, and most of the unmounted maps on hand have been mounted on linen.

A card-index outfit has been purchased and the work of card indexing the books on hand commenced. When this work is completed the library will be able to issue a printed catalogue of real value to borrowerg.

A supply of new instruments has been added to the department of engineering, and there are now on hand sufficient of the instruments generally issued to students to equip a class of 60. A supply of drawing material has also been purchased for this department.

Most of the old-fashioned type formerly on hand was useless for school purposes. It has been condemned and replaced to a considerable extent by new type, but more type must be purchased before the printing office can undertake a large job, such as the printing of a library catalogue.

The arrangements for heating the school are very unsatisfactory. In cold weather the building is kept warmer when supplied with steam from the boiler in the quartermaster's shops, over 70 yards in rear of the school, than when heated by the boiler in Sherman Hall. It has been found necessary for the comfort of instructors to place stoves in their offices; otherwise the rooms would be untenable. The same has not been done in the section rooms, but, nevertheless, during the winter months when c!asses are assembled complaints are of daily occurrence. This condition of affairs will have to be remedied sooner or later, and the matter should not be left until the arrival of another class before it is attended to.

At present the building is lighted with oil lamps, of which there are a large number scattered about the building. It is recommended that power be provided by which the printing presses and an electrical plant could be run and that the building be wired for electric lighting. This would require one 20-horsepower engine, one 35-horsepower boiler, one 3-horsepower electric motor, one 150-light dynamo, one switchboard, building wired for about 125 lights.

It is estimated that the cost of labor and materials for the above would amount to $1,525.

The printing office should be removed to the basement, far enough away from the section rooms to prevent the noise of printing presses and stapling machines being a distraction to occupants of section rooms during recitations. At present the basement is insufficiently lighted to permit of its being used as a printing office, but the windows could easily be enlarged and a few 16-candlepower lamps would supply any deficiency. The removal of the printing office would vacate a room admirably adapted for section-room purposes or the storage of the many instruments on hand in the department of engineering.

Proper accommodations for the photographic branch of the department of engineering should be made, as work in the different processes requires under present arrangements that students travel all over the basement, sometimes to the second floor, and often to the studio, 50 yards away from the school. It is suggested that a photographic studio be built in rear of the school (see plans herewith). The enlarging camera and blue-print frame each require a separate room, and the copying studio requires special arrangements in lighting which can not be had in the present studio, a “studio” only in name. The installment of the electrical plant referred to above would permit photographic work to be carried on regardless of weather conditions.

The matter of the employment of a civilian printer is again urged, as it is impossible to get efficient enlisted men from the garrison. The last "printer” employed did not know how type was distributed in the cases.

The allotment for the fiscal year 1900 has been expended as follows: Stationery, office supplies and material, and card-index outfit..

$194. 50 Library: Purchase of books.

$719.99 Subscriptions to periodicals, binding, and material for map mounting..

154. 07

874. 06 Engineering instruments and materials ...

895. 49 Printing office: Materials

520.95 Labor.

15.00

535. 95

2,500.00

Total.....
Very respectfully,

J. N. PICKERING,

First Lieutenant, First Infantry, Secretary United States Infantry and Cavalry School.

REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. GEORGE B. RODNEY, COMMANDANT CAV

ALRY AND LIGHT ARTILLERY SCHOOL.

CAVALRY AND LIGHT ARTILLERY SCHOOL,

Fort Riley, Kans., November 12, 1900. The ADJUTANT-GENERAL, UNITED STATES ARMY,

Washington, D. C. Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report in compliance with paragraph 10, School Regulations, and telegraphic instructions from the Adjutant-General of the Army:

Due to the frequent changes in the cavalry garrison of this post, the scheme of instruction for the Cavalry and Light Artillery School as given in General Orders, No. 6, 1896, Headquarters of the Army, could not be followed, but the course of instruction conformed as fully as possible to General Orders, No. 3, Headquarters Department of the Missouri, 1899, and General Orders, No. 18, Headquarters Department of the Missouri, 1899; also General Orders, No. 8, Headquarters Department of the Missouri, and General Orders, No. 19, Headquarters Department of the Missouri, 1900.

Monthly reports of this instruction and the deviation from the course prescribed, with reasons therefor, were submitted to the adjutantgeneral, Department of the Missouri. No combined exercises were conducted on account of the lack of cavalry troops as shown by the following:

PRESENT FOR DUTY JUNE 30, 1899.

Organizations.-Field, staff, and band, Sixth Cavalry, 25 enlisted men; Troop A, Sixth Cavalry, 40 enlisted men; Troop E, Sixth Cavalry, 39 enlisted men; Troop G, Sixth Cavalry, 32 enlisted men; Troop H, Sixth Cavalry, 36 enlisted men.

Officers.- Maj. Thomas C. Lebo, Sixth Cavalry; Capt. W. W. Forsyth, quartermaster, Sixth Cavalry; Capt. M, F. Steele, adjutant, Sixth Cavalry; Lieut F. C. Marshall, squadron adjutant, Sixth Cavalry; Capt. H. P. Kingsbury, Sixth Cavalry; Capt. Frank West, Sixth Cavalry; Capt. L. A. Craig, Sixth Cavalry; Capt. B. H. Cheever, Sixth Cavalry; First Lieut. J. P. Ryan, Sixth Cavalry; First Lieut. J. W. Furlong, Sixth Cavalry; Second Lieut. J. F. McKinley, Sixth Cavalry; Second Lieut. Stuart Heintzelman, Sixth Cavalry.

GAIN.

Organizations.—Troop A, Eighth Cavalry, 25 enlisted men; Troop B, Eighth Cavalry, 27 enlisted men; Troop C, Eighth Cavalry, 31 enlisted men; Troop D, Eighth Cavalry, 25 enlisted men; all on January 26, 1900.

Officers.—Lieut. Col. T. J. Wint, Sixth Cavalry, September 20, 1899; Maj.

William Stanton, Eighth Cavalry, January 26, 1900; First Lieut. T. Q. Donaldson, jr., squadron adjutant, Eighth Cavalry, January 26, 1900; Capt. C. M. O'Connor, Eighth Cavalry, January 26, 1900; First Lieut. C. W. Farber, Eighth Cavalry, January 26, 1900; First Lieut. H. B. Dixon, Eighth Cavalry, January 26, 1900; Second Lieut. A. G. Lott, Eighth Cavalry, January 26, 1900; Second Lieut. George Williams, 'Eighth Cavalry, January 26, 1900; Capt. Farrand Sayre, Eighth Cavalry, February 10, 1900, Second Lieut. E. R. Heiberg, Sixth Cavalry, May 10, 1900.

LOSS.

Organizations.—Troop E, Sixth Cavalry, July 2, 1899; Troop H, Sixth Cavalry, July 2, 1899; Troop G, Sixth Cavalry, August 28, 1899; Troop A, Eighth Cavalry, June 14, 1900; Troop C, Eighth Cavalry, June 14, 1900; field, staff, and band, Sixth Cavalry, June 20, 1900; Troop A, Sixth Cavalry, June 20, 1900.

Officers.-Capt. L. A. Craig, Sixth Cavalry, July 2, 1899; Capt. B. X. Cheever, Sixth Cavalry, July 2, 1899; First Lieut. J. P. Ryan, Sixth Cavalry, July 2, 1899; Second Lieut. Stuart Heintzelman, Sixth Cavalry, July 2, 1899; Capt. M. F. Steele, Sixth Cavalry, July 14, 1899; Capt. Frank West, Sixth Cavalry, August 28, 1899; Maj. Thomas C. Lebo, Sixth Cavalry, September 21, 1899; Second Lieut. J. F. McKinley, Sixth Cavalry, November 11, 1899; Capt. H. P. Kingsbury, Sixth Cavalry, November 21, 1899; Second Lieut. George Williams, Eighth Cavalry, March 3, 1900; First Lieut. H. B. Dixon, June 1, 1900; Capt. Farrand Sayre, Eighth Cavalry, June 1, 1900; First Lieut. F. C. Marshall, Sixth Cavalry, June 18, 1900; Lieut. Col. T. J. Wint, Sixth Cavalry, June 20, 1900; Capt. W. W. Forsyth, Sixth Cavalry, June 20, 1900; First Lieut. John W. Furlong, June 20, 1900; First Lieut. E. R. Heiberg, June 20, 1900.

The departure of three troops of the Sixth Cavalry in July and August, 1899, left the cavalry post with insufficient men to take charge of the post, and patrols were furnished by the Light Artillery Battalion to assist in performing the guard duty.

The squadron of the Eighth Cavalry arrived January 26, 1900, with troops having about one-fourth their authorized enlisted strength and without horses. These troops were rapidly recruited to 100 men each, and they were instructed progressively and thoroughly dismounted. The months of April and May were devoted to target practice, and June to dismounted drills, “school of the troop," and such theoretical instruction as could be given in the mounted duties of a cavalry soldier. June 30, 1900, B Troop, Eighth Cavalry, had received only 7 horses and D Troop, Eighth Cavalry, only 6. The instruction of A Troop, Sixth Cavalry,

conformed with the provisions of the General Orders, Headquarters Department of the Missouri, above referred to.

May 29, 1900, a detachment of recruits of the Eighth Cavalry was organized, and its instruction has been conducted progressively, dismounted, and continued as rapidly and as thoroughly as possible with the limited number of officers under my command.

Troops A and C, Eighth Cavalry, left the post for station at Forts Reno and Sill, respectively, June 14, 1900, and on June 20, 1900, the field, staff, and band, and Troop A, Sixth Cavalry, left this post for San Francisco, Cal., en route for China.

Troops B and I), Eighth Cavalry, received their authorized number of horses during July and August, which months were devoted to training horses and men, "school of the trooper.” In September the

“” drill was in school of the troop,” including advance and rear guard and outpost duty.

By authority of the department commander, target practice with pistol was held by these troops during October.

Post lyceum work was conducted during the winter 1899–1900, according to the provisions of department orders quoted above, a scheme for which was submitted to and approved by the department commander.

A series of lectures and theoretical and practical instruction in horseshoeing was given by the chief farrier to the farriers and blacksmiths.

Attention is respectfully invited to the report of the commander of the Light Artillery Battalion herewith inclosed, marked “A,” also to the financial statement of the school secretary for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, attached and marked "B."

In order to complete the post as contemplated, the recommendations of Col. A. K. Arnold, First Cavalry, in his annual report of 1897, for the building of barracks and quarters in both cavalry and artillery subposts, are respectfully renewed.

I would respectfully recommend that kitchens be added to the cavalry barracks for the following reasons:

First. The conditions of the general mess at this post are so different from those of a troop mess in garrison and in the field that officers, noncommissioned officers, and men can not get the training contemplated in paragraphs 280-286 of Army Regulations. This training is most essential to the organizations at this post which are composed almost entirely of recruits.

Second. The method of steam cooking provided for and necessary to cook the large quantities of food required by the general mess at this post does not produce food so appetizing as that cooked in smaller quantities by the company cook over a range or camp fire, and the food can not be served so warm as in smaller quantities to a lesser number.

Third. There is no economy of labor. The help comes from different organizations and there is an entire lack of interest except what is enforced. The feeling of all enlisted men for the general mess is entirely different from that toward their own company mess, which is akin to that toward their own home kitchen and dining room.

All of these conditions have been especially noticed by me during the past year, for the reason that there have been such frequent changes in the number of organizations eating at the general mess and because during the past year three different regiments have been represented in this general mess.

Kitchens and dining rooms could be added to the cavalry barracks at small expense commensurate with the advantages that could be derived therefrom. Providing this is done, I would respectfully recommend that the general mess building at this post be used as a gymnasium, dance hall, and library for the enlisted men of the post. Very respectfully,

GEO. B. RODNEY, Lieutenant-Colonel Fourth Artillery, Commanding.

a

« PreviousContinue »