Page images
PDF
EPUB

upon officers of this department, and the good conditions existing at present, by which these cities are freed from the yearly scourge of yellow fever and other tropical diseases, is in a large manner due to the efficient, intelligent, and earnest manner in which the work of sanitation has been performed. With the exception of the yellow fever now existing among the troops at Santa Clara, there have been no outbreaks of epidemics in the department, and in this instance the outbreak is one for which the troops themselves can not be blamed nor can the sanitary inspectors. It has been directly traced to houses which had been infected some years previous, by the occupation of Spanish troops, and the fact of this infection having been concealed by the inhabitants of the town, its existence could not be known to the sanitary inspectors, nor could it be successfully guarded against. So far as the troops are concerned the greatest loss of men from duty has been from venereal disease. This is partly owing to the fact that but little control is kept over the houses of prostitution by the civil authorities. Under my direction the houses have been regularly inspected, and weekly and biweekly inspections have been held of the individual soldiers, under the personal charge of the surgeons, with most satisfactory results. (Special attention is called to the report of Chief Surgeon "Ives, in reference to this important matter. Appendix D.)

As in other administrative departments, the quartermaster's department has transacted a large share of the civil business. Disbursements from island funds for public works of all kinds have been made by army officers, and, wherever practicable, by the quartermasters. I'he chief quartermaster of the department has been the chief disbursing officer. At the same time the quartermaster's work with reference to the troops has been thoroughly performed. They have been well quartered, well clothed, and amply supplied with transportation, which is of excellent quality. (For further details as to service performed see reports of chief and disbursing quartermasters. Appendices E and F respectively.)

The work done by the subsistence department has been materially lessened by transferring the supply of food for the destitute to the different Alcaldes throughout the department. The ration furnished for the troops has been in the main satisfactory. Very few complaints or recommendations have been made, though all company and post commanders still insist that the profits of the post exchange are necessary for supplementing the ration furnished. In this connection I desire to renew my recommendation of July 10, that the ration of each soldier be increased by a daily allowance of 5 cents, to provide for the proper supply of fresh vegetables, and such articles as can be advantageously purchased where the troops may be serving, and to obviate the necessity of profits from the post exchange as an adjunct to the army ration. The supply of ice has not been as abundant nor as satisfactory as desired. A more liberal supply would be advantageous to the troops, and the supply for the civil population is entirely inadequate and too expensive. (For further details as to services performed see report of chief commissary. Appendix G.)

The duties of the signal service have been fully and satisfactorily performed. Some new telegraph lines have been built, others repaired, and the service in every way improved and bettered. The work falling upon this department has at times been heavy, especially in the recent elections, but it has fully performed all services demanded of it. The

[ocr errors]

telephone line from Trinadad to a connection with the central line of the island has not yet been constructed, but it is urgently needed, as I have frequently recommended. (For further details as to service performed, see report of signal officer. Appendix H.)

The work performed by the chief ordnance officer of the department has been merely routine office work, all supplies being furnished from the depot at Havana, except small arms ammunition, of which a small reserve supply has been kept on hand here. The duties of inspector of small arms practice have also been performed by the acting chief ordnance officer of the department. The course of instruction in target practice, prescribed hy orders from division headquarters, has been held. (For further details see reports of ordnance officer and inspector of small arms practice. Appendices J and K respectively.)

There has been an immense amount of work devolving upon the office of the chief engineer of the department, all of which has been faithfully performed. Practically all of this work has pertained to the civil affairs rather than military, consisting of reconstruction of public works and sanitation. (For further details see report of engineer officer. Appendix L.)

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF MATANZAS AND SANTA CLARA, MATAN

ZAS, CUBA.

Staff officers on duty at department headquarters for the fiscal year

ending June 30, 1900.

PERSONAL STAFF.

[ocr errors]

James H. Reeves, first lieutenant Second Cavalry, aid-de-camp, acting ordnance officer and inspector of small arms practice, from January 31, 1899. This officer has served with great intelligence and fidelity, and to my entire satisfaction.

G. Soulard Turner, first lieutenant Tenth Infantry, aid-de-camp, from October 27, 1899. This officer has shown himself to be intelligent, active, and competent. Although recently appointed to the service, he is in every way qualified for the duties of his position.

Alga P. Berry, first lieutenant Tenth Infantry, aid-de-camp, acting ordnance officer and inspector of small arms practice, from October 14, 1899, to January 31, 1900.

DEPARTMENT STAFF.

E. J. McClernand, lieutenant-colonel, acting adjutant-general, U. S. Volunteers, adjutant-general from July 6 to August 20, 1899. This officer was relieved to accept the position of colonel in the Fortyfourth Regiment of Infantry, U. S. Volunteers. He was highly commended in my last year's report, and it gives me pleasure to add that he is an officer of the highest merit and character.

E. St. J. Greble, major, assistant adjutant-general, U. S. Volunteers; adjutant-general from September 19, 1899, to February 21, 1900. This officer was relieved to accept a position on the staff of the majorgeneral commanding the division. During his service with me he showed himself to be an officer of high accomplishment, great ability, and strict attention to duty.

Sumner H. Lincoln, lieutenant-colonel Tenth Infantry; acting adjutant-general from February 27, 1900. This officer is a gallant veteran of the war of the rebellion and of the Spanish war, in both of which he was wounded. He has shown himself to be highly competent as an adjutant-general, and most conscientious and faithful in the performance of all his duties. He is again suffering from his wounds, and I trust will receive a leave of absence for surgical treatment as soon as the affairs of this department are closed.

J. H. Dorst, major, Second Cavalry; acting adjutant-general to July 6, 1899; acting inspector-general from July 7 to August 17, 1899. This officer, although he served with me but little over a month, impressed himself upon me as being worthy of the highest rank obtainable. He was strongly recommended by me, and left my staff to take command of the Forty-fifth Regiment of Infantry, United States Volunteers, at the date of its organization.

Frederick S. Foltz, captain, Second Cavalry; acting inspector-general to July 7, 1899; acting assistant inspector-general from July 7 to October 8, 1899; acting inspector-general from October 8, 1899; acting engineer officer from July 11 to 29, 1899, and from October 8 to 28, 1899. This officer has shown himself to be in every way capable of performing delicate and important duties, and has served with me to my entire satisfaction. His versatility well illustrates the advantage of an education at the United States Military Academy.

Harvey C. Carbaugh, major, U. S. Volunteers; judge-advocate to October 5, 1899; acting assistant adjutant-general from August 19 to September 19, 1899. This officer left me for duty in the judge-advocategeneral's department, where he is now serving. He showed himself to be in every way capable of performing the difficult and delicate duties with which he was charged.

William J. Glasgow, first lieutenant, Second Cavalry; captain and acting judge-advocate from October 5, 1899; aid-de-camp to October 4, 1899; acting ordnance officer to October 14, 1899; inspector of small arms practice from July 25 to October 14, 1899; acting adjutant-general from November 15 to December 5, 1899, and from February 21 to 27, 1900. This officer has served with me as aid-de-camp, ordnance officer, acting adjutant-general, and judge-advocate, and has discharged his various and exacting duties with fidelity, intelligence, and industry.

James B. Aleshire, major, quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers; chief quartermaster to October 28, 1899. This officer served with me as chief quartermaster of the First Army Corps, which he moved from Kentucky to Georgia, and thence to the island of Cuba, where he became chief quartermaster of this department. He is intelligent, active, methodical, and capable of filling any position in his department, from Quartermaster-General of the Army to quartermaster of a department or division.

William H. Miller, major, chief quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers; chief disbursing officer of civil funds; acting chief quartermaster to November 6, 1899; chief quartermaster from November 6, 1899. This officer has served with me from the date of the consolidation of the Departments of Matanzas and Santa Clara as chief disbursing officer of civil funds. He has performed all of his duties to my entire satisfaction. He is methodical, watchful, careful, and competent to fill the highest position in his department.

George S. Cartwright, major, quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers; depot quartermaster at Matanzas to May 30, 1900. This officer has served under my command from the date of our arrival in this island until May 30, when he was promoted to be chief quartermaster of the Department of Habana and Pinar del Rio. He is an officer of excellent character and abilities.

H. B. Chamberlain, captain, assistant quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers; assistant to the chief quartermaster from July 7, 1899. This officer has had special charge of the renovation of Spanish barracks, and of the repair of jails and streets in the interior towns, and has discharged his various duties to the satisfaction of his immediate superiors as well as myself.

Walter B. Barker, captain, assistant quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers; depot quartermaster at Cienfuegos.

M. R. Peterson, major, commissary of subsistence, U. S. Volunteers; chief and depot commissary at Matanzas. This officer has served on my staff and under my observation since January 12, 1899, and has given entire satisfaction. He has recently been promoted and ordered to duty as chief commissary of the military division.

George LeRoy Brown, major, Tenth Infantry, acting chief and depot commissary from September 25 to November 30, 1899. In addition to his duties as depot commissary, Major Brown has performed various duties of inspection of money accounts and civil affairs. He was subsequently appointed collector of customs at Cienfuegos, and has discharged all of his duties with fidelity and intelligence.

E. B. Fenton, captain, commissary of subsistence, U. S. Volunteers; depot commissary at Cienfuegos from July 25 to September 21, 1899.

Frank J. Ives, major and surgeon, U. S. Volunteers; chief surgeon, superintendent of correctional and charitable institutions from December 26, 1899. This officer has performed his duties as chief surgeon with high professional skill and success. As superintendent of charities and corrections he has done a great deal of most excellent and intelligent work. His report for the year is specially commended to the attention of those in higher authority and especially to the SurgeonGeneral.

James H. Hysell, major and surgeon, U. S. Volunteers; sanitary inspector to February 5, 1900. This officer performed his duties as chief surgeon of the Department of Santa Clara, of sanitary inspector of that province, and on my staff until ordered to duty as chief surgeon of the Department of Santiago and Puerto Principe. He has shown himself to be highly intelligent and efficient in all his work.

Lewis Balch, major and surgeon, U. S. Volunteers; sanitary inspector to August 29, 1899. This officer came into the island with the first United States troops, serving under my observation to the date just mentioned, at which time he was relieved to go to the Philippines. He is a gentleman of high intelligence, energy, and activity.

J. Hamilton Stone, first lieutenant, assistant surgeon, U. S. A.; assistant to the chief surgeon from February 19 to June 14, 1900. This officer has shown himself to be exceedingly intelligent and devoted to his duty.

James B. Houston, major, additional paymaster, U. S. Volunteers; chief paymaster from August 15, 1899, to April 20, 1900. This officer is one of the most rapid, accurate, and successful paymasters in

the service. He is competent by education, character, and ability to fill any office in the corps to which he is attached.

Otto Becker, major, additional paymaster, U. S. Volunteers; additional paymaster stationed at Cienfuegos from September 5, 1899. This officer has served as additional paymaster, and has only recently joined the department staff

. He is painstaking careful, and accurate. John Biddle, captain, Engineer Corps, U. S. A.; chief engineer officer to September 19, 1899. This officer served with me as chief engineer of the Sixth Army Corps, First Army Corps, and in the expedition to Porto Rico. He preceded me with the first troops into this department, and has shown himself to be an officer of enterprise, courage, skill, and ambition. He was relieved September 19, 1899, at his own request, for service in the Philippines, where he is now chief engineer of the military division. He is an ambitious and rising officer and sure to give an excellent account of himself in the future.

William J. Barden, first lieutenant, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A.; engineer officer from October 28, 1899. This officer succeeded Colonel Biddle as chief engineer of the department, and has performed all his duties to my entire satisfaction.

Samuel Reber, captain, Signal Corps, U. S. Volunteers; chief signal officer to August 6, 1899. This officer served with me in the Sixth and First Army Corps, accompanied me to this department, and was constantly engaged in the various duties of his position. He is a scientific electrical and civil engineer, and is fully capable of organizing and running a signal department for an army of any size. He is an officer of vigor and ambition.

Frank E. Lyman, first lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Volunteers; assistant to signal officer to August 6, 1899; signal officer from August 6 to October 26, 1899.

William M. Talbott, first lieutenant, Signal Corps, U.S. Volunteers; signal officer from December 28, 1899, to June 9, 1900. This officer has performed all of his duties to my entire satisfaction.'

Charles B. Rogan, first lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Volunteers; signal officer from November 6 to December 28, 1899, and assistant to signal officer from December 28, 1899, to June 9, 1900; signal officer from June 9, 1900. He has performed all of his duties honestly and faithfully, and as he is intelligent and well educated, he may reasonably hope for distinction if he remains in the service.

Charles J. Stevens, captain, Second Cavalry; inspector of rural police to September 22, 1899; provost marshal from July 7 to September 22, 1899. He performed his duties to my entire satisfaction, and was relieved to take command of his troop at his own request.

Francis J. Kernan, captain, Second Infantry; provost-marshal to July 7, 1899. In addition to the duties of provost-marshal, this officer performed the duties of inspector of rural police. He is capable of performing the duties of any staff department, and is an officer of high character and abilities.

Eli A. Helmick, captain, Tenth Infantry; acting inspector-general from August 19 to October 8, 1899; acting engineer officer from September 19 to October 8, 1899; acting provost-marshal and inspector of police from September 22, 1899. This officer has performed the various and exacting duties of his position with marked ability and

He is methodical, attentive, and capable. His judgment is excellent, and he is sure to rise to distinction in the service.

care.

« PreviousContinue »