An Essay on Value: With a Short Account of American Currency

Front Cover
Rand, McNally & Company, 1897 - Money - 232 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 214 - That the value of foreign coin as expressed in the money of account of the United States shall be that of the pure metal of such coin of standard value...
Page 218 - ... the established policy of the United States to maintain the two metals on a parity with each other upon the present legal ratio, or such ratio as may be provided by law.
Page 216 - That any holder of the coin authorized by this act may deposit the same with the Treasurer or any assistant treasurer of the United States...
Page 61 - Or if the one species of labour requires an uncommon degree of dexterity and ingenuity, the esteem which men have for such talents, will naturally give a value to their produce, superior to what would be due to the time employed about it. Such talents can seldom be acquired but in consequence of long application, and the superior value of their produce may frequently be no more than a reasonable compensation for the time and labour which must be spent in acquiring them. In the advanced...
Page 218 - And It Is hereby declared to be the policy of the United States to continue the use of both gold and silver as standard money, and to coin both gold and silver into money of equal Intrinsic and exchangeable value...
Page 214 - That in all payments by or to the Treasury, whether made here or in foreign countries, where it becomes necessary to compute the...
Page 73 - ... and exclusively enjoyed by those who have peculiar facilities of production ; but by the greater quantity of labour necessarily bestowed on their production by those who have no such facilities ; by those who continue to produce them under the most...
Page 215 - ... which coins together with all silver dollars heretofore coined by the United States, of like weight and fineness, shall be a legal tender, at their nominal value, for all debts and dues public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract.
Page 60 - Such nations, however, are so miserably poor, that from mere want they are frequently reduced, or at least think themselves reduced, to the necessity sometimes of directly destroying and sometimes of abandoning their infants, their old people, and those afflicted with lingering diseases, to perish with hunger, or to be devoured by wild beasts.
Page 94 - A broad-wheeled waggon, attended by two men and drawn by eight horses, in about six weeks' time carries and brings back between London and Edinburgh near four ton weight of goods. In about the same time a ship navigated by six or eight men, and sailing between the ports of London and Leith, frequently carries and brings back two hundred ton weight of goods. Six or eight men, therefore, by the help of...

Bibliographic information